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MlLTON RECORDTRANSCRIPT.
MlLTOM. MA.

1.1UNCORD JOURNAL
LEXINGTON, MA.

w.6.220

w. 7,400
APR 291982

APR 16 1982

6elv.sclfl

...in :·bu,in~s~~-

SUFFOLK MOOT COURT WINNER A finallst In the 1982 Tom C. Clark
Mbot Court C(>mpetltlon sponsored by
S1,1ffolk Yolreralty Law School was
Pamela Smith (right) on1oe Harbor
View Rd. Here, she and her partner,
Joshua Werner of Randolph, hold
\ plaque~presented following rr_!lna! -..

round of competition. Shown. with
them are (l~r) the judge& for the
competition:' Judge Hugh H: Bownes,'
First Circuit, U.S. Court ..of· Appeals,
Judge Levin H, Campbell, First Circuit,
U'5. Court of Appeals, a_nd .Lawrence
G. Sager, profess(?r of .law at New York
: University Law S~hool. _ _ _ __

- f:FlELD DAIL!
WAKEFIELD, MA.

sOS'l'{JR IDBB
llOStON.. MA.
a.l!Wil1l

a.1•

MAR 16 1982
r-=-

Enrtland
Ncwsclip

.

Pam ,Indeck
On Suffolk
·Debating Team

.

Ne...,
EnglaDd

NOV 221982

New

Newsdip

Babson 1nvna11ona1 - 1
i
Championship
____ . - - .;Babson 91 .... ,: _ ..,. Suffolk 71
, , I~
Consolatlo~
Salem St 90 .... ..... ·· ·· · ·
Y 71
J
Cedarville lnvltatlonal
1
Consolation Gordon 67 !
Bluflton 73 .......... ···· ··: · · . ·
Keene St. Holiday tourney
Championship
W Chester St 78 .., Adelphi 61
Consolatlon
i Phila. Textile 77
. Keene St 67
N.C. Wesleyan lnvltatlonal
·.
Consolation
,~/
l KiQqs 73
. ..
. Thomas ,qc
1

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BOSTON - Pam Indeck of 201 Vernon st, .Wakefield, a sophomore com- ,
muni<mtions and speech major at Suf- ·
folk ,Uni;versity, has h~ct contin_4ed sues
cess as a member' of the Suffoll(Univer-

Alan B. Shaw'
- ,_· ';f '.

Alan Bm:~lY: ·.Shti.w of ,Na0 _
slmwtm· Hr•f1<1. has been ap"
pointt~ vicepresid(~nt \tt BankA1 mt•.tka lntemi1non,}I (~I) In Bmv
'toi1 .. Ht.· prevtoi.1sly . ~er,ved'. as ,
assist.u1t vke president at : ~·
B0st011 .. IYior;Jojoi11ing the bani(·

in 1980. he 'served as, president
of the:. Center IOI' lntem.atlonal '
Services. an lntei;na(ional inarkeiin~ llr0:1 I~ Bostbn. , . ·

Lida'. Bander of Church Street,
a senior communications a'nd
~peech major at' Suffolk lJ_nlversity. has "been participating in the
Walter M. Burse Forensic Society
this semester. _She has won ~l
individual , trophie;; in the

sdioof' s 'rournam~nts,
''
·,

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1

ARLING IUN ADVOCATE
ARLINGTON, MA.

'.,~-s ., -_"'"'. - ·_ . . -· :· · .oi9;t' APR 2 21982
w. 12.000

-Eben c. Courant of Virginia
Fadns Road, in · Carlisle, •w~
.awarded a junior var~ity letter in
- skiing at.. the ,annmil .. winter
. sports diriner .a,t V ~ont ~d\ ~ni.y retently: ' ·.
··

lege_ and t 1ca ,University, ndeck has
contributed greatly to twr teai:n's nr:st
placeJinishes. i.
·
, ~ ~ m~i>owusor-AJ.rston, formerly of
' At Centra_I ConnecticUfState College,
Ariingtori, . and Rick Sherburne of 23
Indeck and teammate Rich Auffrey of
Cedar ave. are niernbers.of the Suffolk
Stoneham won a _first place trophy as
Unixtrs,ity Walt.er M. Burse Forelmi.
IC
the top debate duo at the tourn·ame~t.
Soc1e y. Both are speech and com·
In addition, Indeck won a third place
munications majors. Both.have received
trophy in the individual speaker
trophies in competitions in sµch areas as
awards. One week later at Ithica
interpretation of drama, ~ftersdlnner
spealting, ~ama~if _duo itjterpretatiort I
Universit);, Indeck duplicated her ef· ,,,.J
forts in again taking third place honors ~d rhe~or1cal cr1bc1Sm.
in the top sp~a_ker award category at)
the tournament., -, :-· - · ·· ,

A

IWJNIICD DAILi

MERCURI

DAILY TU1ES & CHRONICLE
READING

MEDFORD, MA.
D. 9.400

OCT 30

Nev.

1981

MAY 12, 1982
N~clip

Newscli.lJ

-\

MtUtUKD

DAILt

MERCUll'f

MEDFORD, MA
0.

Julie Beers
earns honors·

9.400

NOV 1 '11981

New
England!
'
~ewsctii

.

rM~id;~ m~tt
top debater

, at Sµff olk

f
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I
1

1

MALDEN, -

Dan Bart-

lett, Z2 Revere St., Malden ·

a sophomore majoring in .

un1

es1ty, 1s a metlffierof
th"'e W_altet M. Burse Debate ·
andFor¢risic S9ciety. ·.
.
In ·.a· recent tournament ·
held at Pace University, :
Bartlett and1.teammate Billi
Shanahan of • Pembroke ~
·bro.ugb.tJiuffol~. University::
a first place fm1sh, •the se- t
cond year in·a r~w that Suf~ :
folk University ti.as won this :
· ,~
honor. ·
' .. In addition, Bartlett won ;
individual honors by being
-named the· .first place"
speaker , overall for the ?
weekend tournament (or the }
second year in a row. . , ._J
Dr. Edward Harris·, chair-·:
man of the communications ,
. de\)arti:ne~t · af. SU:Uolk
) Umve~1ty, 1s the d_U'ector of
~·· the Forensic Society.
1

i

cmmr

MANCHESmf
MANCHESTER, MA.

w. 1.908

.

I
I

DEC 10 1982

l

Zltq!!:tj,",D~l{aters·sweep . .

.i S1iffi1llfdt1iv•. TOUrnalllellt
¥

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'



,· ·. '. ~anchester•s·No~ice deba~rs, led by Nan and PauFFitzpatrick w'ori the trophf for ·se~·
f'Iatch arid Laurie' .Meehan;- captllf~d the,. ~ond place negative'team; with a record of 4 .
:fr~i~e,;it's Trophy fottfirst plac~'_fpur:persqn ·': win$ .and no losses. Miss Meehan was tied foi.
. · " uinf'·abtpe Suffolk Universi p~~.ate Touma, thi~d place in individual speaking. ,
·
•~
t" tn~t;J1eld o turpay, Deceiµ~er 4.. With
Hugh_ Bethell jllld David Schowalter alst5
.: J,:overalfrecotd df 11 wins arid) Joss, M,ail~ participated in the varsity division of the tour;.
'' '~n~ter'f !lO}'jGes won a total; of Six,.awards. L,nament; but, for the first time this year, thej
Ffrst p~ce ~rmative team:: went. to· Nan were, edg~dout in preliminary competition.
:, t~atch.:and Andrea Maio, who:had a: record.of
Judging f<>r Manchester were Ann Toda,
, fQ. Nap Hatc.l:i ~0, ,tc;mk first place among Elisabeth deLafor~de, and Debate coach;
. :.Jlie 60 <!~r,aters in ~~ conte$Lfol' individual··"' -1:im,,Averill. ~he-,debaters· b:avel, to Warwick f
, : ·-~~eaking._ · , .
.• ·
;· ·•
. , ,, ~.qhis_ weekend f9r a"citiien-judge" touma~l
,>; ~, ·~~ond :place< affirmative t~am went =:to} ftpfnt; h~ldi· with' ln'¢tsame·:format that Mari~,
:,>~stil)e:McCoy and Susan Cost~llo who com- . cb,~r1
wJlt~Jo.r January ,29, 1983 tour-·
·, m!e~f a 3 win; 1 -loss, r~cord. L~urie Meehan : ,~lit; at which Mancbester citizens will bei
-·> , . ..
. '
_if_.. · ·• , ..invitet:Uojudge.. ; , : . -' .
. ';,

>

·an

0

;ts

-" - -

,., .·,,.::JIO,e, '~ --· ·., .

In · a season where competitive
excellence has been unmatched
Julie .Beers of 87 Pt.escott ·St.,' ha~
made another marJ_c in the annals of
Suffolk I Joillff§!!y forensic · perfot'iiiince.
·
Beers, a .senior communications
major and a three-year member of
the university'~ higQly praised and
nationally ranked forensic team has
continually excelled throughout her
speech career. She reached the
pinnacle of succ~ however at' a
~ent i?umament hosted by Suffolk
Umv~rs1ty when she ~eived eight
trophi~ and first. place pet;ttathlon
honors to give her 106 total career
trophies:
· ·
.Beers is the first person in Sµf folk
University forensic' history to surpass the HJO career trophy mark an
~onor_realized .bY: less _than 20 ~le
m the 20 year history of forensics
Such overwhelming success 'has·
~n no stranger to Beers irt •11er ··
' S ~ career. Last year s~
rece1v~ the first place· speakef'
award m the now defunct Eastern
Forensic ¥50Ciation, an a,Uiance ~
1
15 east coast colleges. - ,
. I~ a recenttournament .Beers was
~onore(\ a:s the' fotµ1:li place speaker
m the· newly formed Northeast
Forensic League. The Northeast .
_fo!'ensic ~~~~ ~!µ<;11.replaceq_Jl~ .•••-

, -Eastern"' 1Fo1et1Bic','· ~afi.J~. ~·. is :.....;
comprise!i of 22 , colleges• and

1

universities in the' geographic~~ .
~rth of Virginia and, east of Ohio: '
These ranldngs are l:lased · on ·
cumulaUve points r~eived · for ·
. winning · performaif<!es throughout ~,
the entire eighttournamerit'season
· &krs finished wiUi 231.kuniulati;e
,_points while,teamniate Lida Bander
'of West Concord won the ·nrst place
aw~d with 246 points.
· ·
··
The competition this year · was
outstanding ·. a,s ·attested to . by the
narro~ one point differential bet~
ween the _second, third and fourth
place speakers. ' •.
'.
.
Beers accumulated h~r 237 points
and fourth pl~ce fuµsh in .the,'stan~
dings by placing:witliiµ,the
_thr@e 1•
penta~o~ s~er$. ir(Jqur.1:9£ the.· .
sevento];UJlaments.sh · -m'· ·· · ._,,.,.

top

::nt~~'.:'"'''' --~rank,'/:
yearthi$ ye~,,:;·,>"

-,

'

tii~'t~~ew~··aC. . , . .

:-·'.'.The·

Suffolk. Untversuy
. A l1m_ TuftS lJ)µversity peLa!
.·odi.~_c;/e. b~fsh~
.
graduate; mi~,·is. a· SbJ.dent , ...
Bar.A$500.ia~Qlf:B:et>~ll-: •· times .during the year. The
tative. at $1.lffolJt Un!vem"ty. editors and staff . of the ,
Law School.·· She is ·a1so a Review are chosen from the
utigatiori .paralegal_ in the second and third year day
la:w;.offi.
,.ce.of The First Na-;-. classes and the third and
·tiQ~.~anltofBoston : ,. -.~.-......._..·~._lU'-"'vening classes.
_. ·_·"'
·.
,·..
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.,i,,..-,-

11f:!..·

wpu·

, at ~UttOlK
. ,. ''
.
MALDEN, - Dan

.~
t

. 11
Bart- l

lett, 22 Revere St., Malden~
a sophomore majoring in .
communications at Suffolk ·
!Univesity, is a merlffierof
th"l!" milter M. Burse Debate ·
aed For~nsic Society.
In .,a. recent tournament
held at Pace University, :
ijattlett andt teammate Bill i
Shanahan of Pembroke ?
.brougb(Suffolk University~
a first place finish, ·. the .se- i
comtyear in·a rqw that Sufs;
folk University n,as won this ~
honor. ·
.
·~
' In addition, Bartlett won ~
·individuai honors by being ;
-named the· .first place"'
speaker ,overall for the
weekend tournament (or the t
secon<i year in a row. . .-l
Dr. Edward Harris·i chair-·1
man of the communications :. department , aC ·Sqffolk
j.Unive~ity, is the director of J
,·, the Forensic Society. .

i

emmr

MANCHESmf
MANCHESTER, MA.

W. 1.908

i

l

DEC 10 1982

Z1~i:>,!i.~i\DiJaters:sweep ·

"'I'

,

. ,,.

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...

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, . ·, $ancllester's'Noyice debat~rs, led by Nan and PauFFitzpatrick won the trophy for se, Hatc.h · and Laurie' Meehan~- captured the , .cond plac!.:! negative team; with a record of 4
f:. -Presi<ient's Trophy for fast place'.Ipo.r:Person ;: win~ and no. losses'. Mfss Meehan was tied foi
'., uhit""a(the Suffolk Universi De.bate Touma~ third place in individual speaking. ,
,
~ :mept,Jeld o . tur~ay, Deceqibet'4.. With art ·. Hl,lgh Bethell jfud David Schowalter alsq
:; i overan:'record of fl ,wins and:· 1 loss, Man~ participated in the varsity division of the tour;
·' C~n~ter's :11ovi~es won a total' of 1 awards. ;., nament; but, for the first time this year, they
·First p~te · affirmative teanf went to· Nan· · were edged out in preliminary competition.
:, Jlatdiand-.AndreaMaio, who'.had a record.of
Judging for Manchester were Ann Toda,
.· .4-0. Nan. Hatcll also. ,took first place among Elisabeth. deLaforcade, and Debate coacfi.t
: Jhe 60
in tll~ conte$t ,fol'- individual· ,,,, --Tim-.,Averill. '.f.he,debaters· ~avel- to WarwickJ
·speaking.'· ·. · ·. · •
y •.
· . _ Itqhis weekend fora "citizen-ju4ge,,touma~;
,:, G:··Second ·, place affirmative team went ~to ,,men~ licld with ,tfler: same :fonnat that Man2.
:'VKristine;McCoy and Susan Co~llo who co~ .. cij~~r;w~lt~.for January 29, 1983 tour-'
:, piJeg a 3 win; 1 foss, r~cord. L~urie Meehan , ,~rtt; ai which Manchester citizens will bf
·
. .cinvited. to judge., ,
'

six

4ep.i!ers

if

--

--

,.,

.',ro;:I"~ ;_r;_c:.._:.;.:.• ,.,··

has

a.

p,:SuffilllUniv••
;Tournament
'.

formance.
Beers, a .senior communications
major and a three-year member of
' the. university's highly praised and
natfon~y ranked forensic team has
continually excelled throughout her
speech career. She reached the
pinnacle of success however at a
recent·toumament hosted by.Suffolk
University when she ~eived eight
ttophi~ and first place peqtathlon
honoi'S to give her 106 total career
troptµes~
· ·
·Beers is the first person in Suffolk
University forensic· history to surpass the 100 career trophy mark, an
hpnor realized l:>y less .than 20 people
in the 20 year history of forensics. · _
Stich overwhelming success
been no stranger to Beers irt her -·
speech career. Last year s®
received the first place speaker.
award in the now defunct Eastern
Forensic l),ssociation, ·an a,Iliance ~
15 east coast colleges;--· ,
'
I~ a recent' toUI'nament .Beers was
honoreq as the.fotgtli place speak~
in the· newly formed Northeast
Forensic League. The Northeast
'. f 0-~ellSic ~~~;:-VIBSh.~~!!£~<tth~,
,.,.,. "" rn- ,... vremnc.·· A:iax..iatiou. i3 --compriseµ · of 22 , colleges·: and
universities in the' geographical area
'north of Virginia and.east of Ohio:·
·These rankings are t:1ased · on
cumulative points recElived · for ·
' winning performances throughout .
the entire eight tournament'season.
. J3Eiers finished with 237.eumulative . points while,teammate Lida Bander
'of West Concord won the 'first place
aw~d with 246 points.
·
·The competition this
was
outstanding ~s attested to .. by . the
narrow one point differentjal bet~.
ween the ,second, third .and fourth
·. . • .,
place speakers.
Beers accumulated h~r ,'JZ/ points
and fourth place f~h in the 'standings l:>y placiiig witljiri the top'three /
pentathlon ~akers m· JQ.ur' of. the. '

year .

.§!; ., . :i~-{
year-~qtfiope , _

. _

.

,,~,:1.~
covet~ nµ~
. • . . ' - .... · " a ,·
Bander, 'a. ·ienior1~1ciltions
major, alsoduplicafedthis-fMt··/·:.··· .
Dr.· Edwffl'.d J,, ~j~. <:Jiaimlan ·
of the comm~catimilj·'departmerit
at Suffolk....lJmversity and director of ·
the· forensif"teani said, "This is the
first time ever in collegiate forensic
history that two people ·from the
same team have eclipsed the 100 .
trophy mark in ·the same
truly an i outsta,·ndin~ '
ent.''
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1

CONCORD JOURNAL
lEXINGTON, ML

w. 7,400

JUL 1

1982

"

Arthur Dickson of Concord, a
Academic Honor Society.
1947 graduate of Tufts UniversiConcord residentMary Lou
ty, was elected to Tufts' Alumni
Council in, recent balloting by the Riker, RN, assistant director for
alumni body. He will serve a 10- nursing services at The Malden
year tenn. Currently president of Hospital, WfiS rec~ntly elected
System Technology Associates, president-elect of the MassachuInc., in Concord, Dickson is also setts Society for Nursing Service
a member of the International , Administrators. Riker will serve .
. , Association of Assessing Officers as President-elect until ¥ay of .
and a prolific author of profes- r----· ··· · - - --X
siorial papers. He has written I
.and presented works which deal '
with servomechanisms, air-to-air
missle systems and most recen(- .
ly, the use ofcomputers to assist ·
in mass appraisal. Dickson is a :
member of Tufts' athletic booster
organization, the Tufts Jumbo I
Club. He was one of nine alumni
to capture Tufts Alumni Council ·\
seats in recent voting.
.
.
I
Lida Bander of 50 Church St.,
West Concord, was cited ~ - 1
folk University's Student Recognition Day for attaining highest
honors of any senior transfer student in the College of Liberal Arts
an._d Sciences. Bander was also
the recipient of a Departmental
,soclates,_ President John B. Finigan; Academic Citation in Communi- ,
(Photo by Qwen O'Rourke) cations and Speech. She is a ·
member of the Delta Alphi Pi j
1



1

1

At an open house celebrc:itlng the anniversary of Fred T. Boyd

center, talks wfftl. Jack Sharpe, left, and Charles SWlnton, right.
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SALEM EVENING NEWS
SALEM. MA
~

sp.!MS
ll!lleW

DEC 10 1~82

E111gld
N~lip

Mainehester -~- . .-- -

C
Novice

- -

- - -- -

-

\

debaters win 1·1 i[n ·12, tries·1

B•.S.U.SANHARRINGTON
iNewsCorrespondent
·· M
·
. MANCHESTER ....; · ~me·hest er ' s novice
.
. ebat·ers, Ied by Na11, ·Ha·tch an d Laur1e
·
;d
.
.
'Meehan; captured the President's Trophy
, ,tor first.plac~ four-person.imit at the.suf:.,
folk Umvers1t~ Debate Tournament last
Saturday. <

· ··· With an overall record of 11 wins and 1
loss., M.anchester's novices won a total of
six awards. First pl~ce affirmative tea~
went to Nan Hatch and Andrea Maio, who
· had a record of 4-0. Hatch also took first
plac_e among the 60 debaters in the contest
for individulµ speaking.
Second place affirmative team, went to
11 r
Kristine iucCoy and Susan CostelIo who
complied a 3 win, 1. los~ record. Laurie
Meehan and Paul Fitzpatrick won the
;. trophy, for second .place negative team,
": ,with :a~ re~ord of,. 4\wins .and·. no losses. ·
.. Meeh~n was"tied tor third place in in.. dividual speaking •." , ._ , -.·,·· •:... , : ·~"' · .·-···· · -::
. Hµgh Bethell and. David Schowalter also
participated in the varsity division of the
tournament; but for the first time this year,
they were edged out in prelimiµary competition. .
.
.
Ju~giI1g for Manchester were.Ann Toda,
Elisabeth deLaforcade and debate coach
Tim Averill. The debaters travel this
weekend for a "citizenship.jµdge'.' tour;nament, held with the same format that
·Manchester will use for its Jan. 29 tourn.amept at W;hich Manchester citizens will
be invited to judge.
JlJNIO);l WGH DANCE
,The Jr. High St'lident Council is sponsoring a Christmas aance Friday, I>ec. 17
from 7 .to 10 p.m. All Manchester seventh
and eighth graders are invited; ·Admission
will be $2.
. . .· .
SILENT STUDY~ This week, Manchester Jr.-Sr. High
School reinstated silent study halls.
·
The objective of the silent study haU
concept is to provide a quiet atmosphere to
students who need to improve academic
performance in two or more subjects.
Assignment is mandatory until the
student's performance is certified C or
better by the subject teacher. Assignment
,to a silent hall is available upon request
. from any student or parent..
~-

-

MEMORIALHONORROLL
'
JI.Jttee; consideration .. of holiday ~n~
0
Students·on the Memorial School Term I
-iacation pay foi' bus drivers~ ~pprova .
honor roll are·as folio· ws.·
,·.,y for 1 ·d Schrock; . al Education
Mrs. f s
hmng of. m~
~
·Grade 5, H1·gh Honors - T1·m Sm1'th, . Ned
:tructiona ai e or peci. energy com. '
't · h p 0
· roposal· . ·
Gubbins and Jennifer Park; Grade 6, High m~;::fmlnt · system; finance
Honors-Kathleen Curry.
.
1:tommittee direction o~ budget.; CPA~
Grade 5, Honors- Matt Abbott, Michael
~roject survey and review of this year s
Earle, Jess Leber, Patricia Runne~s.
t,rojects; word processing program needs;
Ashley Short, Lewi_s Wogan, Rebecca
.policy on unexcused absen.c~; approv~l o~
Dunbar, Kerri Glickman, Chris Chew, · transportation bid for special education,
Robin Earle, N~talie Appleton, Abby
consideration of rental ~f space for school
Bannett, Derek Kennedy, David Hall,
buses; approval of pohcy statement_ for
Suzapne Nicol, Craig Pollock, Becky Shaw,
Chapter 622 ; Title IX;. approval of p~~cess
Chris Shponds, Coleen Wood.
for approval of private schools, and
Grade \6, · Honors - Julie Beliveau,
.
Christian delRosario, Ben Estes, Rachel
· various reports.
·

10
Hayes, ·uollie. M1·tchell, Beatr1·ce Olivas· , ..• who wouldplanning. to a.ttena t~is. mee 1gd
Citizen~ like agenda mate~ials shou
iu
Rebecca Reech, James Alberetti, Lindsay ·
· t d t'S office
Corace, Lisa Elwell, Connie HaU, Michelle · contact the superm en en
· ··
Lafreniere, Eric Magnu.son, Kirk Nalley, . ilr:-:::=- ·. --'-·
·
·
Ni~ola- ;Ryding, · Carr.ie Smith, Christina- -j
Va:chone, Pamela Briggs, Katina Brown, J
· Armelle-de.LaForcade, Heidi Elwell,M-ark •
Hall, Peter Villa.
BROOKWOOD HONOR ROLL
Atthe Brookwood School in Manchester,
the effort honor roll for the second half of
the first terni has been announced.
From Manchester were: · Grade ·5 Marion Coi:coran; Grade 7 - Brigham Cox
and Shawn Gager; Grade 8 - Charles ,
Dyer, Charles Gifford, Elizabeth Janisch,
Eliza Minot and Jennifer Shuwall.
TOYS FOR TOTS ·
·
.
· The Distributive -Education Class of the
Manchester High School is holding a
campaign for underprivileged children in
theNorthShore·area.
·
The purpose of this·~·
mpaign is to collect
any "extra" toys one ·ght have- toys no
longer being qsed by fa ily ~embers.

The toys may consist of games with all
the piece~. books for young' children, and
any kind of undamaged toys. These toys
may be brought to the high school between
8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through Friday,
from now to Dec. 17. For more information,
interest.ed participants may call 526-4494.
SCHOOL.COMMITTEE
The School Committee will meet Monday
at 7 p.m. in Room 126' of the Jr.-Sr. High
School.
The agenda will include: Student
visory Committee meeting with the c ~

::tJ!

1

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DAILY llllS •
READING, MA
D. 19.200

118Vt6

1981

••nu

.

New
Englanci
~ev;sc~

~---~.~;--~-~-..~~,~:-~-:n:~ ·.-..,··,..,.---._~ ~--: ,: ' - ..;,.,-,---~- ~--~-

~

-~

~~

....~~- -

'--s~ffolk debat0 SOC:~b' honors' local, students
1

Julie Beers· of 87
Prescott St., arid Lisa
S
~e ~e!~';!1ar~is
.
Walter M. Burse Debate
and Forensic Society, lit
Suff~ Universfty. _
In' -a recent tournament held at Plattsburg state University,·
Plattsburg, N. y ., Beers
advanced to the final
round in five individual
public speaking events
and ·won trophies in
each; Beers placed first
in informative and
epidictic, second in
per$uasive, f_ourth in
·,dramatic dt!(?S '"'.~tll._~er
.;.,_partner RictrSherourne

In a.dd.it.ion,' -W"'~. ~as debate · team, both team, saw his team ·-cthr911gh<>ut th~. Country
~
. ha:v..ing achieved ·much clear the district.I~vel invited t<t tile, NatiortW.
rhetorical criticism. a member. of tlie' fourC·.OID.
··petition iri debate> Debate :'I'eaµ}:. Tciur-

of Arlington,. and fifthil1-

Beers firte showing' lit man 'debate tealb who ; success_in the past.
· t r t · · · r in
the tournament earl}E!d combined to take first
Last. spring, . t1'e In ,addition, the team namen
as -; y~a. . .
her a second. place fiiu_·.sb.· p·1ace honors. ·a·s·· th--e· to·P
..
was one of sixty foams , a l i f ,o .r, n 1 a ..
_ - · Qniversity's individµal
in the pentathlon which four-man team :at the 'events team under the
judges an individual's tournament'.. · , :
· , direction of Dr: Gloria-·
overall performance in
Dr. Edward Jfarris, ; Boone,
instrucfoi''in ·,
five events.
·
- chairman of thiii' com- : communications al}d
Wye tied for first munications d'epart- ; speech, participated ~n .
place .for the overall men t at S uff o 1k , the Individual Events
forensic speaker's •Univers;ity; {s ·_ the National Tournament trophy with teammates_ director of· the tforensic held in Kentucky.
pa ni Indeck ci f! Society, which i;' made
..
Wakefield and ,Steve up of the , individual
Br i an Gree 1e Y ,
· ·
,,,,, ~""
··
1.
1 .·
Braga ~;, Norwe.ll · .Th's eve;nts.-· tei:im, -·®d ..:i.'...: -: .ru·rec··.""'"'· ·of the. De.b.ate'
':a"~trophy is presented to 1·:
the individual who
LEWISTON EVENING
excel~ in co11:1~~iti?.!!,i/,·n,,,
JOuRNAL
both_ the, 1_nd1v\df
.1
LEWISTON, ME.
public speaking e~~-"'"
D.111111

u; -

c;

an

,.a~,det;>at;~, w9iYe·; r

Wye woll a stutre. of
this trophy by placmg
(o u r t h Ln , e xtemporaneous speaking
and second for_ the
negative speaker on the
debate circuit. Wye and
Indeck .won first .place
as the top negative team
in debate with a . 6-0
-~ord.

<.;

DEC 2 3 1982

New
England
~_e,~
-

-~~-

- - - ------ -~-

~

tBates -debaters do well
The Bates College Quimby Debating
Council has completed another suecessful season in intercollegiate debate
competition nationwide, the college
reported today.
Bates students have qualified for a
variety of team and individual honors at
debate tournaments during the college's
firt semester, according to Anthony
Derosby, acting debate coach.
The team of junior Steve Dolley of
Hermon and sophomore Gleim Graham
of Whippaimy, N.J., put on a fine performance in tourney competition at
Wake Forest Uniersity in WinstonSalem, N.C.
They accumulated a record of eight
wins and two losses, finishing as quarterfinalists in a field of 60 teams
, representing such institutions as Har· vard University, :Dartmouth College,
Georgetown University, Northwestern
University, and :the University of
Southern California~
In othe~ action, the Bates duo finished
among the top eight teams at a tournament hosted by the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and
i placed in_ the top 16 at Georgetown's
Philodemic Society Debate Tournament.
Throughout the semester, Colley and
Graham handed losses to . nationally-'
ranked teams represe~ting Dartmouth,
rgetown, Emory University,·
-

-

Redlands University of California,
Augustana College of South Dakota,
Loyola University of California, and the
University of Kansas, among others.
Also having a successM' semester
were first-year student Kim Leighton of
Kingston, Mass., and sophomore Paul
Rosenthal of Reading, Mass. At the
&J,lffoJk Uuive~ Debate Tournament,
they qualified for the semi-finals and
finished in third place after defeating
such teams as Harvard, Dartmouth and
BostonCollege.
Leighton was honored as third best
individual speaker in the tournament
while Rosenthal received recognition as
the 11th best. Another Bates debater,
junior James Ellis of Tempe, Ariz., won
an award as the fourth-place speaker in
the event.
·
Others contributing to Bates' success
thus far are sophomores John Moshay of
Beverly Hills, Calif., and Melissa
Mosher of Winthrop; and .senior Lance
Fialkoff of Morganville, N.J.
The college's debating society is
named after the late Bates grad)iate,
Professor Brooks Quimby, noted debate
coach whose career spanned 40 years.
Bates has been active in debate since the
turn of the century and was the first u. s. '
institution of higher learning to compete
in inte.rnatt.·onal debate against Oxford
,
University in 1921.-.\_
,

MAtaBl'ER t:RICKET
MAHCHESlER. MA.

w. 1.908

l"(oW

DEC 101982

:EuJ&lull
~lip

-_--,cc - -,- ;,. . :. . : :: . ·. , ·' :: .. ..

.· ·: ·. :· ·.::~ .. ,

.

,,-

t1\n§~~r; S~~taC~!~r Sat~rday
~ ,Fot Man,~J.i;ster Jr:;;:-St. High· ·
Em~

::. · >,9ecember 4 was another ~cllljer.day ;for of Herh;;§jhlegel; J'im ,Averill, and
0 ·.•academic,· music,- and· athletic{'(accomphsh- Shepard defeated twenty other teams i;it
~ ,'.:jnents for our :Junior-Senior High School Boston College in the Super Bowl of Trivi~,
students.. ··
, .... ·
Our faculty wilLe;Qmpete in the final rounp
. J ,, In Mademics, our debate team comp~led an · with three other finctlist teams.
;'
11-1 record .at Suffolk :University. Ouf~.uo of
Fifty three IIiE!mb.ers of our Marching Banp
) -Nan· Hatch and'" Ahdr.ea Mruo earnec:l jirst played before tlleir large~t audience at Bostor ,
l(i>late,Affirmative Team wi!h -~ u~<lefeated_ ~- University's Nifkerson Field. The. thousai:1$
· ~"re<tord. Sue Costello and Kttstlrl~~~(;)oy were who heard them live and over WESX were 1mawatded second place,Affitm~q¥,~iit~ a 3-1 pressed not only, w1ththe rendition of our N"-:
-, recorcf.,tauiie Meehan: ancf PaµF.fitzpatrick tional Anthem playecl with the Nantucket
:Were undefeated ana earnecf: ~£()Qd ,; place band, -bu.t i by our band's half-time show,.
:Negative"TeanL Manchester won the .Presi- featuring soloi~ts · :Kevin Hersey, ,Amanda.
~dent's Trophy; corhing,infirst place, thanks to. ,.)c:mes, Thad Bl~ak and David.Morley. The
.·' the':four-man. team' of Laurie, Paul, Sue, and audience really showe.d · their appreciatiqp,
· Kristine. ,;
)·, . . ·· " r
a,
:l
: wl;ien .oun:heerleaclers joined the band for
, '." Natf Hatth took·:first place Speaker Award, · -their firepressible version of "Ballin the Jack''. .,
-'for tbe-toutriament, .and ,Laurie Meehan' .,Y,as; .. bl l\thletics, the 1982 undefeatec! Hornet
tied' for third.
. '• '""
football team, coached by first-year faculty
\ :, _Coach :mn ·Averill ":'as· awarded ~~--c.·
m.·.~nib,t:r, Fran :.York,· r~p~ate~ :as Divis~o·n· V
i\p1on:N?v.1~e'C?ach Trop~y. _ . :· . ·. , . . , ~~ainp1qnst so~ndly · def~ating prev19usly
•. ~~~mgm Academics, ourf~ulty ~am--· un~eaten p~mests Nantucket, 28-6.:
·



_..

FITCHBURG •LEOMISTER

SENTINB. &ENTERPRISE
Ne'ff

SEP 131982

England
NewsdiJ)

ham- .·

DAILY TRANSCRIPT
DEDHAM, MA
SEPT. 9, 1982

r
BACK TO THE BOOKS Snffolk JTuiv.crsity President
Daniel H. Perlman (right) ,
welcomed Charles St.
/\mand of Salem (left) and
Mlison Lamm of Townsend
1mong the !¥re than 620

~ '-

Freshman welcome

Among the record cla~s of 620 freshman enrolling. at Suffolk University ,
' were these two 1982 Dedham High School graduates, Mary Ellen Power
of Bingham Ave., left.and Katie NQrton of Jeffer~on~~. They are welcom- '
~ ~Y <tean of st~dents 0. Bradley Sullivan of ~~t,dtlam.. . .
..•
~
1

freshmen, the largest inc om ing class in the
university's history' 'as
college. students around the
country drift . back to tile
campuses. 1
,

)

BOSTOR ffOOBB
BOSTON,. MA.
II..~

NOV 3
.

---- . -

1982
-

-

The late, lamented Bostoll State·
Bostori State College is gone, and the
diaspora: of its former students and faculty members extends to more than a
do~en colleges in eastern Ma~chusetts.
But regrets about its death remain.
Booker DeVaughn, acting president
of Roxbury"Community College and a
·' graduate of Boston State, thinks public
education in Boston has been diminish~eci by the school's closing.
.
"I think the overall result is that it
reduces minority and low-income access to higher educationO''·he said in a
recent interview.
· "I can't see it any other way. Of
course, Roxbury Community College
will take up .some of that. s1ack and,
some will go to UMass and Bunker Hill.
But that's not the same as having a
public, four-year institution here" on
Huntington avenue. •
A former Boston State professor who
declined to be identified was harsher in
his assessment.
"We took care not only o(the urban

minority kid but aiso the working-dais cepted atU~1ass-Boston. Despitea flood
white kid from Chelsea, Everett, .Med, of complaints at the time, at least some
ford. who for one r~son or another is of them are satisfied with how the
merger ·worked out. ·
,
not wanted at UMass," he said.
Bert Gay,·ajunior studying nursing,
"UMass' can say all it wants about
being an urban campus. But what they . said he ·survived "unmolested for the
want is upper-middle-class kids. . .. most part." He's paying about 20 perThey want to be a Harvard on the har- cent more in tuition. 'but "I turn out C
bor. They're just not fulfilling the need •'-having a degree that's more cqmpeth ·
that a public; urban t11stitution tive iQ a job market," he said ..
· But John Daley of Newton.: wh9
should." · . ,,
wanted to remain in a smaller c~llege.
Rol>ert A. Corrigan, chan~ellor of
transferred to Roxbury Community
UMass-Boston, rejects the notf~ ,.th~t
the school is becoming elitist or is turn~ College rather. than going to UMass. He
also objected to the drive to the UMass
ing its back on· its urban roots. ' .,
campus.on Columbia Point.
But he and John B. Duff,lhe state's
Relatively few of Daley's clai;smates ·
chancellor of higher education, acenrolled at Roxbury. A larger number
.knowledge that many students who
are. now believed studying at Bunker
\\roulq have been accepted at Boston
Hill. And many former, Boston State
State will be turned a:way from UMass
students have turned up as far away as
because of low grades or low SAT
Salell) State College and Worcester
scores.
·
State College. according to Duff.
Under the terms of the merger, stuSome have switched to private col-·
dents who were in good standing at leges. notably Suffolk University.
'._
Boston Sutte were automatically ac- R. S. KINDLEBERG~R

St

METRO /' 'EGION ,
:

\

Huh eollege seats down slightly
1-----------:---------------.:,_.___

rollment of the 27 pubitc colleges and
universities .
Duff and other officials, among
them 'Robert A. Corrigan, chancellor of'
UMass-Boston, argue .that this is a
transition year and that it will take
time to reach full strel'lgth in enrollments after the confusion and adverse
.publicity that surrounded the merger of
UMass-Boston and Boston {:,tate last
year.
Applications to UMass-Boston de.', clined and an undetermined number of
Boston State students dropl)l;ld out of
,school in the couri5e of the year.
However, space limitations appear
likely to prevent the ·c;o~muntty col~
leges from serving a great many more
students under current conditions. At
Bunker Hill, "we're just about capacity," Shively said. Roxbury, which
shares the former Boston State campus
with UMass, has space for another 200
students, whom officials hope to enroll
·in January, but there ls little room for
expanding beyond that,. according to
Jose DeJesus, acting academic dean.
Although enrollment has gone down
in Boston, the loss has been much
smaller than the disappearance of2500
four-year seats that was predicted last
January by a coalition of Boston State
·students and faculty members.
Duff argues that the overall loss of
seats in Boston has been so small that
It can now be said that the controversial plan under which Boston State was
closed has succeeded.
"It looks like we solved the access
problem in Boston," he said two weeks
ago when the preliminary enrollment
Ogures were released~ .
In reaching that conclusion, however, Duff used a Boston State enrollment
figure for last year of only 3600, considerably smaller than figures that were
mentioned last year.
Boston
final enminority kid but also the working-class cepted at UMass-Boston. Despite a flood rollment asState reported its and Duff
4400 in January,
white kid from Chelsea, Everett, Med- of complaints at the time, at least some cited a figure of 4174 a few months hP..
ford, wn6 for one reason or another is , of them are satisfied with how the
not wanted at UMass," he said.

!
By R.S. Kindleberger .
Globe Staff

When 130-year-old Boston State Col- ·
Boston's· publlc college enrollments
lege was about to go out of business last
January, so~e opponents of the stateAlthough the enrQllment at Boston's two community colleges and UMassmandated shutdown predicted it would
Boston (shown as full-time equivalent students) Increased this year, there
drastically reduce the number of public
was not-enough growth to offset the closing of Boston State College. The
c.ollege s.eats in Boston.
figures show that overall about 4 percent fewer students are benefiting from
Staff members of the state's Board
public higher education In Boston this year than last. (Figures from the
speclallzed Massachusetts College of Art are. not Included.)
of Regents of Higher Education disagreed, arguing that expansion of the
.
~~
city's· remaining publlc colleges would
Bunker HIii CC
2317
2605
+288
increase access.to public higher educa·
Roxbury CC
682
885
+ 203
Uon here.
, Newly released enrollment figures
UM&SS•Boston
6735
9500
+2765
for this fall show that both sides were
Boston State College 3893
o
-3893·
off the mark: The number of public col·
Total,
13,827
12,990
.937
lege seats. in Boston has diminished, at
Source: Massachusetts Board of Regents of Higher Education
least temporarily, but the decline has
not been as great as some critics anticipated ..
Overall, public college enrollment in
Boston (measured in full-time equivalents, or FTEs, which count part-time
students as fractions of full-time stu· ably,placed in a,two-year school. While .. gents had hoped that ~ov'lng Roxbury
dents) has declined by 637. The drop in
holding that a:decline in four-year seats Comqiunity College last s,ummer from
four-year seats has been 1128.
is acceptable' for that .reason, Duff and its cramped Dudley street quarters to
Swelled by thousands of former Bos·
the Board of Regents have said that former Boston State buildings on Hunton State students, the Univ:ersity of rapid expansiQn of the city's two-year tington avenue would double its enrollMassachusetts at Boston has grown to
community · colleges, Bunker Hill and ment. Instead, 'the school's enrollment
approximately 9500 FTEs. the largest
Roxbury, would balance out any loss of has grown about 30 per~ent
enrollmenpn its 17-year history and a four-year seats.
'
At Bunker Hill Community College,·
40 percent jump over last year.
d t 1 t
enrollment rose by 12.5 percent, to
The tncrease'has not been enough to
This has not happene • a eas so 2605. Although the school practices
far
·
··
offset the phasing out of Boston State,
open admissions Oike other community
however.
·
· While buff said in a recent interview colleges), Bunker HUI had to turn away
John B. Duff, the state's chancellor that "we have dramatically increased as many a:s 100 students because they
of higher education, has contended that enrollment at Roxbury and Bunk~r. applied late, according to President
many Boston State students were aca- HU!," growth at the two stlhools has Harold E. Shively.
demlcally unprepar~d for a four-year been well below projections.
. Statewide figures show an increase
college and would. have been more suit-·
Staff members of the Board of Re- · of 2744, or 2.7 percent, In the FTE en-

~"

r,· .....,.-..
1

I

..

. . .. ..

i

~.

at

The late, lainented Boston State
. Boston State College Is gone, and the
dia1:1pora of its former students and faculty members extends to more than a
dozen colleges in eastern Massachusetts.

·
I

~

,

1

,
1

~

'

-- _.__._..,_ ...,, '"'' ~ UIV, IIUI

111\ilUU"U•]

'81 ·'82
'82~'83
Change
e· -~.... cu i;umg · lflal expansion ot the
city's remaining public colleges would
Bunker HIii CC
2317
2605
+288
Increase access.to public higher educa·
Roxbury CC
682
+203
885
tlon here.
UMass-Boston
6735
+2765
9500
Newly released enrollment figures
for this fall show that both sides were
-3893Boston State College 3893
0
off the mark: 'Fhe number of public col·
,:otal1
13,827
-837
12,990
lege seats In Boston has diminished, at
Source: Massachusetts Board of Regents of Higher Education
least temporarily, but the decline has
not been as great as some critics anttci·
pated ..
Overall, public college enrollment in
Boston (measured In full-time equiv·
alents, or FTEs, which count part-time
students as fractions of full-time stu'. ably.placed in a two-year school. While . gents had hoped that riioVlng Roxbury
dents) has declined by 637. The drop In
holding that a'.declfne In four-year seats · Comqmnity College last s.ummer from
four-year seats has been 1128.
Is acceptable· for that reason, Duff and· its cramped Dudley street quarters to
Swelled by thousands of former Bos· the Board of Regents have said that former Boston State bujldings on Hunton State students, the University of
rapid cxpansiQn of the city's two-year tington avenue, would double its enrollMassachusetts at Boston has grown to
community' colleges, Bunker HUI and ment. Instead, the school's enrollment
approximately 9500 FTEs, the largest
Roxbury, would balance out any loss of · has grown about 30 perc;ent.
enrollmeni, in its 17-year history and a _'four-year seats.
'
At Bunker Hill Community College,
40 percent jump over last year.
This has not happened, at least so enrollment rose by 12.5 percent, to
2605. Although the school practices
The lncrease'has not been enough to
far
·
open admissions (like other community
~~:i:v~~~ phasing out of Boston ,State,
, While buff saidiria recent interview
colleges), Bunker Hill had to turn away
John B. Duff, the state's chancellor · that "we have dramatically increased as many as 100 students because they
of higher education, has contended that enrollment at Roxbury and Bunk_er. applied late, according to President
many Boston state students were aca· Hill," growtl;:t at the two schools has Harold E. Shively.
demtcally unprepar~d for a four-year been well below projections.
Statewide figures show an increase
college and would.have been more suit··
Staff members of the Board of Re-· of 2744, or 2.7 percent, In the FTE en-

The late, lainenled BoSton State
Boston State College ls gone, and the
diaspora of Its former students and fac·
ulty members extends to more than a
dozen colleges in eastern Massachu·
setts.
· Bµt regre~s about Its death remain.
Booker, Devaughn, acting president
of Roxbury Community College and a
graduate of Boston State, thinks public
education In Boston has been diminish·
ed by the school's dosing.
"I think the overall resultls that it
reduces minority and low-income ac!
cess to higher education,", he said In a
. .
recent interview..
, "I can't see it any other way. Of
course, Roxbury Community College
will take µp some of that slack and
some will go to UMass and Bunker Hill.
But that's not the same as having_ a
public, four-year Institution here" on
Huntington avenue.
A former Boston State professor who
declined to be Identified wa.s harsher In
his assessment.
· "We took care not only of the urban

minority kid but also the working-class cepted at UMass-Bosfon. Despite a flood
white kid from Chelsea, Everett, Med- of complaints at the time, at least some
ford, who for one reason or another is · of them are satisfied with how the
not wanted at UMass," he said.
merger worked out. .
"UMass can say all it wants about
Bert Gay, a junior studying nursing.
betng an urban'camp'us. But what they said he survived "unmolested for the.
want ts upper-middle-class kids. . . . most part." He's paying about 20 perThey want to be a Harvard on the har- cent more in tuition, but "I turn out
bor. !hey'rejus,tnot fulf~lling the need · having a degree that's more competlthat a public, u.rban institution Uve in a job market," he said._ , ,
should."
But John Daley of Newton/ who
Robert A. CQrrlgan, chancellor of wanted to remain lri' a: smaller college,
UMass-Boston, rejects the notion that
transferred to Roxbury Community
the school is becoming elitist or ls tum- College rather than going to UMass. He
Ing Its .back on its urban roots.
also objected to the drive to the UMass
campus on Columbia Point.
But he and John B; Duff, the state's
Relatively few of Daley's classmates
chancellor of higher education, ac- enrolled at Roxbury. A larger number
are now believed studying at Bunker
knowledge that many st~dents who
would have been accepted at Boston
Hill. And many former Boston state
State will be turned away from UMass
students have turned up as far away as
because of low grades or low SAT Salem state College and Worcester
scores.
S te Colle e, accordln to Duff.
Under the terms of the merger, stuSome have switched to private,
dents who were in good standing at Jeges, notably Suffolk Unlver~ity.
Boston State Were automatically ac- '-..::;..._ _ _...;._'=1~:t"?~flc:E·8}1;~r8fit""'

vmcu,o-uu.,LUU- l:lllU 00Sl00

,;jt~te lfl,St

year.
Applications to UMass·Boston de·
· clined and an undttermined number of
Boston State students dropped out of
,school in the cour,se of the fear.
.
However, space limitations appear
likely to prevent the ·co~munity col~
leges from serving a great many more
students under current conditions, .At
Bunker Hill, "we're just about 1 capac1ty," Shively said. Roxbury, which
shares the former Boston State campus
with UMass, has space for another ~00
students, whom officials hope to enroll
in January, but there ts little room for
expanding beyond that,. according to
Jose DeJesus, actingacademlc dean.
Although enrollment has gone down
In Boston, the loss has been much
smaller than the disappearance of 2500
four-year seats that was· predicted ·last
January by a coalition of Boston State
students and faculty members.
Duff argues that the overall loss of
seats In· Boston has been so small that
It can now be said that the controver·
slal plan under which Boston State was
closed has succeeded.
"It looks like we solved the access
problem In Boston," he said two weeks
ago when the preliminary enrollment
figur.es...were.released... . _
In reaching that conclusion, .howev· ·
er, Duff used a Boston State enrollment
figure for last' year bf only 3600, constd·
erably smaller than figures that were
mentioned last year.
Boston State reported Its final enrollment as 4400 In January, and Duff
cited a figure of 4174 a few months be·
fore that.
_ Duff said t~c~ntly that the earlier
Boston State flgl\reswere based on that
school's practice of counting as full·
time studetjts thpse who were taking 12
credit-hours of courses. Using 15 credit
hours as the standard for fulHJme stu·
dents, as has since bten mandatel:Uor
all colleges by the regents, _red~ces the
Bos'ton State enrollment to 3893.'
Duff would re(i ice It ·further, to
3600, on the basis lhat Boston State
was Improperly Including credits for re~
medial work. A Globe check -of Bunke,:
Hlll and Roxbury showed that they;
too, count those credits In calculating
their FTE enrollments, however.
Another argument In calling retrospectively for a lower enrollment figure
for Boston State, according to Duff and
UMass-Boston' officials, Is that the old
figures 'proved Inflated when former
Boston State students registered at
UMass last February.

at

SALEM EVENING NEWS
SALEM, MA
SEPT. 28, 1982
Newsclie

-~---~~~

--

-- -

l EcOllo nty' boost~__ i~~ge
BJ PETER HOMAN
News Staff
,
Salem State College wasn t
alone when it experienced an
\lllexpected surge in enrollment
this fall. Earlier this month .
Suffolk University, Boston,
"iiiiioi111ged t:hat ,kl. freshman
class, 620 students, is larger
than last year's by 25 percent
:tt-and up so percent of the firstyear class of two years ago.
Suffolk Admissions Director
1oWilliam Coughlin listed t!o
mprimary reasons for the . m't'.i'Crease which came when ~a
.naumber of private co~ege~ and
.iuriiversities are expenencmg a
btdecline in incoming freshm.en:
-"'tuition (at $3,630, Suffolk claims
.;~e lowest of any private four.°Eyear institution in the area), and
si!'growing acceptance br,
students of commuter colleges.
Economics may be the un,derlying reason for commuting
~~~ut Coughlin said "the negative
!)1image of cqmmuter colleges
1
'' seems to be fading."
R,·
0

r---~

of commuter colleges )
PROVIDEN,CE JOURNAL
P.ROVlDEN.CE,, IU,
Ll. 72J»Jl

MAY 241982

New
Ne"Wacli1

.FFather was insl}ifatioll,"'
URI student notable says (
SOUTH KINGSTOWN, - Eva- recap her class's college years, and
Marie Mancuso, daughter of Provi- the second part will discuss an
dence Police Chief Anthony Man- .acronym, PRIDE; and. what each
cuso, has. been selected to oe the , initial means to the class of 1982.
University of Rhode Island's stuMiss Mancuso plans to attend
· dent spealter at commencement, ·&_.uff jk tiniversjty Law ~ in
· · . the all, and creditsFerfather for
ceremonies May .30.
She will deliver the address be- · helping her Vlith a career choice.
fore ~.030 undergraduate and 600 ; "My dad has been an inspiration to
graduate students during· the uni- · · me," ·. she · said. "His work and his
versiiy's 96th commencement.
life have been devoted to law and
Retired Vice Adm. James Bond order."
St9Ckdale, former Naval War Col-.
An intern in the attorney generlege president, will deliver the com- al's office, Miss Mancuso described
mencement address.
Deputy Atty. Gen. Susan McGuirl
Miss Mancuso, a political scienc,e as "an incredible role model." Miss
major, was one ·of 30 who applied Mancuso assisted Miss McGuirl on
to be the university's student · the VonBulow attempted murcier
speaker. A committee of students case.
interviewed each applicant before
A graduate of Cranston East
selecting Miss Mancuso.
_High School, Miss Mancuso is · a
Criteria for selection included an student senator, a member of the
awareness of URI, a demonstrated debating team and a Family Court <
involvement and commitment to research assistant. She also directed
the university, and an ability to a student lobbying group at the
speak well.
'
state legisiature and at the goverThe topic of her address, sched- nor's office.
'µled to begin at 2:10 p.m. on the
quadrangle of the Kingston cam~
She plans to dedicate her address
1'QS, is "Activism in the Eighties." .to her late mother, who died two j
'lie first part of her address will years .ago.
J

1

...::..'.:.

~

I

I

·s THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION
{

CHRONICLE SURVEY

Applicationsfor Fall Admission Decline
at Private and Public Colleges
Applications for admission to this fall's freshman classes at private colleges and universities
were down by about 2 per cent through the end of
June, compared with the number of applications
a year earlier. At public colleges and universities, applications were down by 1 per cent compared with a year ago.
The number of deposits paid by freshman applicants, which indicates more serious intent to
enroll, declined more sharply than applications:
down 6.3 per cent at private institutions and 3.2
per cent at public institutions.

Those estimates are based on reports from 292
four-year institutions in a national survey conducted for The Chronicle by John Minter Associates, a research organization in Boulder, Colo ..
A similar survey last year found freshman applications for admission to public and private
four-year institutions in the fall of 1981 were up
6.5 per cent over the previous year. The actual
enrollment of first-time freshmen last fall, however, was down by just under 1 per cent from the
previous fall's total, according to the National
Center for Education Statistics.
PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS
Freshman applications
for Fall 1981 as of:

Freshman applications
for Fall 1982 as of:

Freshman applications
for Fall 1981 as of:

Freshman applications
for Fall 1982 as of:

:lfi~~,. :;IIIIRF!·
March~-

100%

-=March

80%

80%

70%'

70%

60% ·'
50%
40%

30%·
20%

10%

-----0%

0"4----

Note: All percentages are of the total in June, 1981

CHRONICLE CHART BY PETER H STAFFORD,·

Changes 1n Number of Freshman Applicants
June SO, 1982, compared with June 30, 1981
Change In
average•

Per cent
reporting
Increase

.Per cent
reporting
decrease

Private colleges and universities
Research and Ph.0.-granting .. .
Comprehensive ............... .
Liberal arts ................... .

- 0.1%
- 2.1%
- 2.0%

52.4%
38.3%
39.4%

47.6
60.0%
60.6%

- 5.4%
- 7.3%
-144%

- 0.2"/o
- 3.8% ·
- 3.4%

Regions
Northeast and Mid-Atlantic .... .
Great Lakes and Plains ... .
Southeast .................... .
West and Southwest .......... .

- 1.4%
- 0.3%
- 0.8%
- 2.6%

45.2%
37.9%
29.0%
50.0%

54.8%
60.6%
71.0%
50.0%

- 93%
-10.3%
-14.4%
-12.4%

- 3.4%
- 3.6%
- 4.3%
- 0.8%

- 5.1%
- 1.8%
+ 1.3%
- 2.0%
- 0.8%

33.3%
42.5%
46.4%
40.0%
40.0%
40,2%

66.7%
57.5%
50.0%
60.0%
600%

-21.7%
-10.6%
- 6.7%
- 8.6%
- 5.4%

- 55%
- 2.4%
- 2.9%
- 1.5%
- 3.8%

59.6%

-

-

Enrollment
500-999 ................. .
1,000 - 2,499 ................ .
2,500-4,999 ................ .
5,000 - 9,999 . . ....... ; ..... .
10,000 anq over ...•...........
All private Institutions ••••••••••

- 1.9%

Change
Low**

9.9%

Medlant

2.3%

High*

+

4.1 %

+ 3.0%
+ 7.4%
+ 4.1%
+ 6.0%

+

1.5%

+
+
+
+
+
+

4.0%
6.8%
61%
18%
2.5%

+ 6.8%

5.2%

-/

PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS
Freshman applications
for Fall 1981 as of:

Freshman applications
for Fall 1982 as of:

Freshman applications
tor Fall 1981 as of:

Freshman applicatiol'ls

tor Fall 1982 as of:

0%

0%

Note: All percentages ·are of the total in June, 1981

CHRONlCLE CHART BY PETER H STAFFORD,.

lh Number of Freshman Applicants
June 30, 1982, compared with June 30, 1981

Changes

Change In
average•_

Per cent
reporting
Increase

Per cent
reporting
decrease

Change
Low••

Medlant

High*

Private colleges and universities
Research and Ph.D.-granting ...
Comprehensive ............. , ..
Liberal arts ....................

0.1%
2.1%
2.0%

52.4%
38.3%
39.4%

47.6
60.0%
60.6%

-

- 5.4%
7.3%
-144%

0.2%
3.8%
3.4%

+ 4.1%
+ 3.0%
+ 7.4%

Regions
Northeast and Mid-Atlantic .....
Great Lakes and Plains ........
Southeast .....................
West and Southwest ...........

1.4%
0.3%
0.8%
2.6%

45.2%
37.9%
29.0%
50,0%

54.8%
60.6%
71.0%
50.0%

- 9.3%
-10.3%
-14.4%
-12.4%

3.4%
36%
4.3%
0.8%

+
+
+
+

Enrollment
500-999 ............
1,000 - 2,499 .................
2,500 - 4,999 .................
5,000 - 9,999 .......... : ......
10,000 and over ... , ...........
All private instltutl9ns

5.1%
1.8%
+ 1.3%
2.0%
0.8%
1.9%

33.3%
42.5%
46.4%
40.0%
40.0"/o
40,2%

66.7%
57.5%
50.0"/o
60.0%
60.0%
59,6o/o

-21.7%
-10.6%
6.7%
8.6%
5.4%
9.9%

55%
2.4%
2.9%
1.5%
3.8%
2.3%

+
+
+
+
+

Research and Ph.D.-granting ...
Comprehensive ................

+ 1.8%
1.9%

64.2%
53.4%

35.8%
46.6%

6.5%
8.3%

+ 2.2%
+ 02%

+ 7.7%
+ 87%

Regions
Northeast and Mid-Atlantic .....
Great Lakes and Plains ........
Southeast ...... ··············
West and Southwest ...........

+ 3.8%
+ 0.6%
1.3%
1.3%

76.2%
55.3%
50.0%
59.1%

·23.8%
44.7%
500%
40.9%

- 0.3%
9.3%
6.8%
-13.8%

+ 3.2%
+ 0.2%
1.2%
+ 47%

+ 6.4%
+ 8.0%
+ 7.2%
+104%

Enrollment
500-2,499 .................
2,500 - 4,999 .................
5,000 - 9,999 .................
10,000-19,999 ................
20,000 and over ...............
All public institutions .•••.•••••••
All institutions ...................

1.9%
+ 2.8%
1.8%
3.4%
+ 3.0%
1.0%
1.6%

70.0%
57.1%
47.8%
50.0"/o
694%
56.1%
45.7%

30.0%
42.9%
522%
50.0"/o
30.6%
43.9%
54.1%

- 5.7%
- 5.3%
-118%
9.0%
52%
6.9%
8.8%

+ 29%
+ 02%
42%
2.5%
+ 31%
+ 1.,8%
0.9%

+11.4%
+21.5%
+ 5.3%
+ 5.4%
+ 8.0%
+ 8.1%
+ 6.8%

..........

4.1%
6.0%
1.5%
6.8%

4 00/o
6.8%
6.1%
1.8%
2.5%
+ 5.2%

Public colleges and universities

Percentage change in mean number of applications by June 30, 1982, compared with the mean for a year earlier
The bottom one-fourth of the institutions reported smaller increases or larger decreases than the percentages shown
Half of the institutions reported smaller increases or larger decreases than the percentages shown
:j: The top one-fourth of the institutions reported larger increases than the percentages shown
Note: Sut:Yey data are from a stratified random sample of 292 four-year colleges and universities. excluding those with enrollment under 500

t

SOURCE: SURVEY FOR THE CHRONICLE BY JOHN MINTER ASSOCIATES
PO BOX !07, BOULDER, COLO 803o6

..;~

New
E"1land
J-.!'<:\1- scli>!

SUFFOLK PROJECT- RobertW. D~~ker, vi~e f1i~:.John S. Howe,, chairmanof the-University's,,.
president of· the Hollett Building Corp. of ,JJoard of Trqstees, and Francis X. Flannery, !
Wa~efiel~. signs constrqction contract for.,; yice pres}dent,,and treasurer of Sµffolk U n i ~
$600,000renovationprojectinvolvingtwoSuffoll(~-\'ty .. ::, __ '._.. -· - ___.----'-~
- ,_
t\._~niv~ buildi~gs ~n B~acon Hill. Loo~ing o~--~:_l_ :~· _:~

MIDDLESEX NEWS

FRAMINGHAM, MA

u. 60.300

OCT

61982

"""

Engtand
Newaclip

Students get a, ~1st-hand ·look' at coilegeS
ByTOMZUPPA

plaf!es three and four colleges, techmcal D·eCoste,· headne1ghborhoodbecamea "I'd like to-get into give the Army four
deep, _to .get a glimpse schools and nursing ~.ou~se~or at . North: parking lot. .
business, but I might years. They pick up
fRAMINGHAM
at shck brouchures, sch~ols _, ~ore than This 1s .to give .the Many semors said want myself settled at tuition, room and board
The year-long quest to · school colors and 14~ mall - pitched t~e' students a look at the they have no idea school and ta~e liberal and give .you $100 a
find the right-college mdunds of coJlege vrrtues of their college, and get where they are headed arts." · ,
,, month."
.
j
began ··in earnest for entrance applications., programs: ·,
. a n s Vf e ~ s t o a n y n~xt fall, or what they Another Hopkinton With. reduce(,l federal· .
many high sch.ool · They have- a tough Accordmg to fair questions they may.will be studying.
. .senior, Dave Everest. Student assistance . ,
seniors here Monday choice to make. coordinatpr Robe~t have."
" . "I've looked at s~id he was thinking money ,was the majo;
night.
.
Representatives of the Decoste,. the event is Plenty nad,questions. UMass, some state about enlisting in concern of many.
·
At tlle Framingham big (Harvard, MIT), held to give students a The fourth annual'.f~ir schools," Arnie Cohen, ROTC training but .
,
..
College Fair 1n the small (Bard taste of what.each wass?chasuccessth~t a_Nort~senior,said:"Ih~dn't made up, Qis N_,ancy_ Fine,
' Framingham North College), the far-away school offers.
. the :scho~l cafeteria di?n't see that much." mmd. "You go to school ,ass1~ta!1t director of
High School, students (Northwestern
We never_ look at 1t sweltered.from the heat 'I don't know," said and come out a second ad1!11ssi~ns .at Suffolk
and t'heir parents University, University a~·~ replace~en~, for;a genera t~d by .the John .Walls, a senior at lieutenant," he said., ~ 1
vers1~y m Bosto~/
queued up, in some .of Tampa), junior v1s1t to the site, · said cr~\\'d, and the North Hopkmton High School. "All you have to do is ~.aid. Ufat money 1s
_
·
... ·
always a concern" for .
.,_ -- __ parents and students.
News Sfi!ftWriter

1

f

' ' P e O p l e a·re
impressed when we tell'
them that tuition is
$845, . as opposed to
several thousand,''
Lo~ise McCau~ey,
assistant director of
admis.sions at
.Framingham State
College, said. · ,

The financial aid
r booth ·even outdrew
some school booths ·
w~,tp . sJ.udents ,rnd
parents hned up to fin.ct I
o'i)(qow they.canapply':
for 'aid.
.
·:

NASHUA TELEGRAPH
NASHUA, NH.
D. 24,000

FEB 1 9 1982

New
England

~~

3 Huh colleges hike tuition
By The Associated Press
Harvard University and two smaller
Boston-area schools said Tuesday that
tuitionwillgoupthisfallbetween13and
15 percent
·
. .
Harvard, citing pressures on its schol~
arship and loan pro~ams and needed
faculty increases, said undergradua!e
tuition~ndroom-and-boardchargeswill
increase by 14.8 percentfrom $l~,5oo to
$12,000.
The $1,560 overall hike was vo!ed
Tuesday by the Corporation, . which
governs the school's administration.
Henry Rosovsky, dean of the arts an<l
sciences faculty, said, "Tuition fees constituteoneofourmajorsour_ces_ ofoperatingfunds,anditiswithgreat.reluctance

that we must raise them."
Sl,!ffolk Universitt said it would increase u~dergraduat~ ~ition $420, a 13
percent increase bnngmg the yearly
cost to $3,630.
Daniel H. Perlman, Suffolk president,
also said the university's law school tuition would rise $500 to $4,900. Tuition in
the school's other graduate programs
would increase between $480 and $630.
Perlman cited general inflation and
faculty and staff expenses as the reason
for the hikes.

,
Emerson C9llege said undergraduate
tuition at the communications school
would increase $750, from $4,900 to
$5,650. Room charges would increase
from $2,170 to $2,450, ijnd board plans . /
would rise 13 percent.
_J

8ROCl10N ENIERPIISE •
BROCKTON TIMES

.N.MA

FEB 1 'l 1982

New
England
&w,clip

\rH8rvird,. Suffolk, Effle,son hike tuitio~~---.
'
By The Associated Press

An undergraduate at Harvard will face a $12,lQO tuition, room and 'board bill
next year, an increase of
$1,560 ·over the current academic year.
..:..:snffoJk Jioiyer§ity and
Emerson College, also in the
Boston area, also have an; nounced tuition increases.
Harvard, citing pressures
, on its scholarship and loan
programs and needed fac'- ~ty salary ~~~~.ases, said

undergraduate tuition :md
room-and-board charges will
increase by 14.8 · percent
from $10,540 to $12,100. ·
The $1,560 · overall increase was voted Tuesday
by the Corporation which
governs the school's adniinistration.
Henry Rosovsky, dean of
the arts and sciences faculty, said, "Tuition fees constitute one of our major
sources of operating funds,
and it is with ,orP.at reluc-

tance that we must raise $2,170 to $2,':i50, and board
plans would rise 13 percent.
them.'·'
He said Harvard intends
President Allen Koenig of
to continue to. assure that Emerson said blamed the inany student admitted will be creases on inflation, faculty
able to attend, regardless of salary increases and cutfinancial need. About 65 per- backs iri federal aid.
cent of the 6,500 Harvard ~
·
J
and Radcliffe undergradu- \
,.. - - ·•
ates receive financial aid, ineluding off-campus employment and ba:n_k loa~s · . .
Suffo!k Umvers1ty said 1t
would _1i:icreas~ undergradu~
ate t~1bon $420, _a _13 percent mcrease brmgmg thEl
yearly tuition cost to $3,630.
Daniel H. Perlman, Suf. folk presideQt, also said the
university's law school tuition would rise $500 to I
$4,900.
Tuition in , tlie '
school's other graduate pro- 1
grains would increase between $480 and $630.
Emerson College said undergraduate tuition at the
communications
school
would increase $750, from
$4,900' to $5,650, Room
ch~r_g~s would .increa~ fr~

. 1·

UAILT 11MB
WOBURtf.11&

D. ]1121!i

Ne,,
~a

JUN 161181

~e_'W!C!ir

Travel on a :;cier1~e trip
f

-to the Bay of
A marine scienc~ field trip to the
Ba~ of F_'undy has been planned for
semor high stµdents of the Woburn
a~ea under th_e sponsorship of the
~irst Congregational Church of that
city.
.
·
Faculty from . the· 'Biology
Chemistry, Math and Physics·
D~partmepts of Suffolk University
will host the trip at the University's
Marine Field Station, located at
Edmunds, Maine:
·
·
. The weekenq trip, June 25-27 will
fOfUS on ~arine biology with field
· trips ~o view colonies of seals, the
American Bald Eagle and underwater marin'e animals.

WQOHso.cKEl r.AW

WD.QNSQ.CKET. RI
I)_.

will

Water.quality experiments
be\·
conducted by tt1e chemist; star and,;,
planet gazing will be 1featuted 'f:iy; ;~
the_ Physics Department wlth the 1,:
us~ of a Celestrcm telescope. . · · •·. , ,,
There will be a demonstration of,,
the passive solar collector that is ,used to, heat water at the'-/
Laboratory.
· '
' ·
~·r.:
, .
· Interested high-school students~.·'
may obtain further infqrmatiori
ab~,ut this activity by calling the;,
office of the F!rst C~ngreg~tionaf ::
Chu_rch of Woburn (933-1642} or by,calhng Suffolk University at 723c
4700 ext-347. .
·
'

New
England

r-._- ---- -- ---.: --- --~~-~ ~~-:- - --~:if1cli!)

~~-

-. 3 Bay State Colleges--"
i'RaiseTuition Fees
t.

.

~

. .

FundY ·

-------~--~~---.tiJ

32.5®

fEB1 '11982

·',,·

.

.

'

By TM Associated Press
.. regardless of financial need. Abm~t 65 percent o,f.
, . An undergraduate at ~arvard will face a : the, 6,500 Harvard and Radcliffe undergradu,ates :
$12,100 tuition, room and board bill next year, an ;receive financial aid, inc1uding off-campus emf\
increase of $1,560 over the ·current academic'<ploymentandbankloans
\
.
· ·.
·;/
year.
- ··
; Suffolk University said it would inct~ase Wl/i'
SUffol~ University and Emerson CoHege, also r dergraduate tuition $420, a 13 percent increase ·
in tfie Boston area, also have announced tuition ;bringing the yearly tuition cost to $3,630.
,,
increases.
,
.
, , Daniel H. Perlman, Suffolk president, also s.a~4>':
Harvard; citing pressures on its scholarship · .the ~iversity 's law school tuition would: H~ and loan programs and n~ded faculty salary $.500 .t,o $4,900. Tuition in the school's <>tbet[;,f
increases, said under~r:~dilate tuition and room- _. graduate programs would increase between $48~!:
and0 ®ard chargeswil:l mcrea~ by' 14.8 percent, ;and~O.
.
.
_· . ; (
from $10,540 to $12,100.
.
Perlman cited general inflation and facul~y _.
The $1,560 overall increase was voted Tuesday, and staff.expenses as,the reason for the increasby the Corporation which governs the school's ¢8.
·
.
administration. ,
, Emerson College said undergraduate tuition at
Henry Rosovsky, dean o( the arts and sciences . the 'communications school would increase $750,
faculty, said, ~ 'Tuition fees constitute one of our-· from $4,900 ·to . $5,650. · Room charges would
major sources of operating funds, -and it is with increase from $2,170 to $2,450, and board plans
great reluctance that we must raise _them;"
w:9Uld rise 13 percent.
He said Harvard intends to continue to assure . . President Allen Ko~nig of Emerson said
that a:ny student admit,ted will be able to attend, · blamed the increases oh inflation, faculty salary
· • 1 · n ~-·! _ L
. ; increases and cutpacks in federal aid.
·'

BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE
BOSTON, MA

s. l:106,$9

New

OCT 311982

England
Newsclip

' • ;~ ,; ;, '."? ,, •J:.'-4 YEAfi '.
-

PRlf~~T!T\JJIO~§

f.olla'win'9~u~a~""~dvate _
institutions have the iu:i\hority from the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to ;
confer degrees at or above the
Baccala!!_reate level
- '
Admiss(ons standards and programs
differ from school to school Contilct the
admissions office of each school for
specific details and procedures
Tuition ChaJges- Tuition costs for nonpublic colleges and universities vary
greatly from approximately $3200-$9075
per year The average cost is $56()0, not
including room and board
1 American International College
1000 State Street
Springfield, MA 01109
(413) 737-7000
2 Amherst College
Amherst, MA 01002
(413) 542-2338
3 A(ldover Newton Theological
School
210 Herrick Road
Newton Centre, MA 02159
(617) 964-1100
4 Anna Maria College
Paxton, MA 01612
(617) 757-4586
5 Assumption College
500 Salisbury Street
Worcester, MA 01609
(617) 752-4586
6 Atlantic Union College
Main Street
South Lancaster. MA 01561
(617) 365-4561
7 Babson College
Babson. Park
Wellesley. MA 02157
(617) 235-1200
8 Beacon College
14 Beacon Street
Boston. MA 02108
(617) 367-9345
9 Bentley College
Beaver and Forest Streets
Waltham, MA 02254
(617) 891-2244
19 Berklee College of Music
1140 Boylston Street
Boston. MA 022fs
(617) 255:1400
11 Berkshire Christian College
200 Stockbridge Road
Lenox, MA 02140
(617) p37-0838
12 Boston Architectural Center320 Newbury Street
Boston, MA 02115

i;h,e.-

·-,~, -'--_'>170

>..,,

1"""-T:f Boston ·cotiege .

I


_

_

Chestnut Hill, MA 02167
x3290
14 Boston Conservatory of Music
8 Fenway
Boston, MA 02115
(617)' 536-6340
15 Boston University
121 Bay State Road
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-2356 .
0

28. Goddard GFaduate· Program
in Social '.Change
.
48 Boston Street
Somel'l(ille, MA02143
(802) _229-0522. x28_8
29 Gordon College
255 Grapevine Road
Wenham. MA 01984
(617) 927'-2309_
,...
30 Gordon"Coriwe11' ftieoidgical
Seminary
130 Essex Street
South Hamilton. MA 01982
(617) 468°71111
31 Hampshire College
Amherst. MA 01002
(413) 549-4600
32 Harvard University
Garden Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 495-5000
33 Hebrew College
43 Hawes Street
Brookline. MA 02146
(617) 232-8710
34 Hellenic College
50 Goddard Avenue
Brookline, MA 02146
(617) 731-3500
35 Lesley College
29 Everett Street
Cambridge, MA 02238
(617) .868-9600
,
36 Mass College o.f Pharmacy &
Allied Health Sciences
179 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 732-2850
37 Massachusetts General Hospital
Institute of Health Professions
40 Blossom Street
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 726-3140
38 Mass Institute of Technology
77 Massachusetts Avenue ·
Cambr1dge, MA 02139
(617) 253-4791
39 Mass School of Professional
Psychology
785 Centre Street
Newton. MA 02158
/617) 964-6930·
4Q Merrimack College
Turnpike Roaa
North Andover, MA 01845
(617) 683-7111
41 Mount Holyoke College
South Hadley, MA 01075
(413) 538':.2023
42 New England College
ofOptometry
424 Beacon Street
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 266-2030

...,

16 Bradford College
320 South Main Street
Bradford, MA 01830
(617) 372-7161
17 Brandeis University
Waltham, MA 02154
(617) 647-2878
18 Cambridge College/
Institute of_Open Education
15 Mifflin Place
·
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 492-5108
19 Central New England College
o! Technology
768 Main Street
Worcester. MA 01608



~

of Muoic

.(617·) -969-0l 00,

44

45

46

47

48

49

290 HuntingtQSJ Avenue
Boston. MA 02115
(617) 262-1120
New England School of Law
154-156 Stuart Street
Boston, MA 021l6
(617) 267-9655
Nichols C.ollege
Dudley Hill
Dudley, MA 01570
(617) 943-1560
Northeastern University
360 Huntingtqn Avenue
Boston. MA 02115
(617) 437-2222
Pine Manor College
400 Heath Street
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167
(617) 731-7104
,Pope John XXIII
National Seminary
558 South Avenue
Weston, MA 02193
(617) 899-5500
Regis College

'

l,,

58. Swain Schd<il oJc bi!sigll' ·, '". ·'
10 Hawthorn Street. ·
New Bedford, MA 02740
(617) 997-7831
59 Tufts University ..
Medford, MA 02155
(617) 381~3170
60 Wang Institute
of Graduate Studies
Tyng Roa(:t ,.
Tyngsboro. MA 01879
(617) 649-9731
61 Wellesley ColltJge
Wellesley, MA 02181
(617) 235:0320
62 Wentworth Institute of Technology
550 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 442-9010
63 Westerr. New England College
1215 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01119
(413) 782-3111, x321
64 Weston College of Theology
3 Phillips Place
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 492-1960
65 Wheaton College
Norton, MA 02766
(617) 285-7722
66. Wheelock College
200 The Riverway
Boston. MA 02215
(617) 734-5200
67 Williams College
Williamstown, MA-01237
(413) 597-2211
68 Woods Hole Oceanographic
Institute
Woods Hole, MA 02543
(617) 548-1400
69 Worcester Foundation
for Experimental Biology
Shrewsbury, MA 01545
(617) 842-8921
70 Worcester Polytechnic Institute
)
Worcester, MA 01609
(617) 793:5286
;'

(tllf J ~tl'I- I IUU

(617) 731-3500
35.. Lesley College
29 Everett Street
Cambridge, MA 02238
(617) 868-9600
36 Mass College of Pharmacy &
Allied Health Sciences
179 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 732-2850
37 Massachusetts General Hospital
Institute of Health Professions
40 Blossom Street
·
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 726-3140
38 Mass Institute of Tec;hnology
77 Massachusetts Avenue
·
Cambr,idge, MA 02139
(617) 253-4791
39 Mass Schoof of Professional
·
Psychology
785 Centre Street
Newton, MA 02158
(617) 964-6930
4Q Merrimack College
Turnpike Roacf
North Andover, MA 01845
(617) 683-7111
41 Mount Holyoke College
South Hadley, MA 01075
(413) 535':2023
42 New England College
ofOptometry
424 Beacon Street
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 266:2030

4 Anna Maria College
Paxton, MA 01612
(617) 757-4586
5 Assumption College
500 Salisbury Street
Worcester, MA 01609
(617) 752-4586
6 Atlantic Union College
Main Street
South Lancaster, MA 01561
(617) 365-4561
7 Babson College
Babson- Park
Wellesley, MA 02157
(617) 235-1200
8 Beacon College
14 Beacon Street
Boston. MA 02108
(617) 367-9345
9 Bentley College
Beaver and Forest Streets
Waltham. MA 02254
(617) 891-2244
- 19 Berklee College of Music
1140 Boylston Street
Boston. MA 022fs
(617) 266;1400
11 Berkshire Christian College
200 Stockbridge Road
Lenox. MA 02140
(617) p37-0838
12 Boston Architectural Center.
320 Newbury Street
·
Boston. MA 02115

f;_c:-T:f· ·soston ·c~lfege,.

I

__ .

-

x3290
.Chestnut Hill, MA 02167

of Muoic

(617) -969-9100,

290 HuntingtQll Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 262-1120
44 New England School of Law
154-156 Stuart Street
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 267-9655
45 Nichols College
Dudley Hill
Dudley, MA 01570
(617) 943-1560
46 Northeastern University
360 Hun\ington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 437-2222
47 Pine Manor College
400 Heath Street
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167
(617) 731-7104
48 . Pope John XXIII
National Seminary
558-South Avenue
Weston, MA 02193
(617) 899-5500
49 Regis College
"2-35 Wellesley Street
Weston, MA 02193
(617) 893-1820. x271.
50 St: Hyacinth College and Seminary
66 School Street
Granby, MA 01033
(413) 467-7_191
51 St. John's Seminary
197 Foster Street
Brighton, MA 02135
(617) 254-2610
52 Simmons College .
300 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 738-2107
53 Simon's Rock of Bard College
·
Alford Road
Great Barrington. fv!A 02130
(413) 528-0771
54 Smith College
.Elm Street
. Northampton, MA 01063
(413) 584-0515'
55 Springfield College
263 Alden Street
Springfield, MA 01109
(413) 788-3136
56 Stonehill College
Washington Street
North Easton, MA 02356
(617) 238-1081, x373
57 Suffolk University ·
8 Asnburion Place
,

Boston, MA 021g~.,
_, • • .
,,

14 Boston Conservatory of Music
8 Fenway
Boston. MA 02115
(617) 536-6340
15 Boston University
121 Bay State Road
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-2356
16 Bradford College
320 South Main Street
Bradford, MA 01830
(61 372-7161
17 Brandeis Un'iversity
Waltham, MA 02154
(617) 647 -2878
18 Cambridge College/
.
Institute of_Open Education
15 Mifflin Place
·
Cambridge. MA 02138
(617) 492-5108
19 Central Nev.'. England College
of Technology
768 Main Street
Worcester, MA 01608
(617) 755-4314
..... 20: Clark Univer~ity
950 Main Street
Worcester, MA 01610
(617) 793-7431 .

!)

2.1 ·college of Our Lady of the Elms
291 Springfield Street
Chicopee, ,MA 01013
(413) 59~-8351 .
22 College of th!! Holy Cross
Worcester, Ma 01610
(617) 793-2443
23 Curry College
1071 Blue Hill Avenue
Milton, MA 02186
(617) 333-044..1_
2,4 Eastern-Nazarene College
23 East Elm Avenue
Quincy, MA 02170
(617) 773-2373
25 Emerson College
100 Beacon Street
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 262-2010
\6· Emmanuel College
400 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 277-9340, xl 15
'

~~1 ·:~·10

Episcopal Divinity School
99 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

~:~!--~:~--~;~~~*"~ ~ :-

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Q;J

66

67
68.

69

70

VVllt;dlUII VVll'G~'G

Norton, MA 02766
(617) 285-7722
Wheelock College
200 The Riverway
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 734-5200
Williams College
Williamstown, Mk01237
(413) 597-2211
Woods Hole Oceanographic
Institute
Woods Hole, MA 02543
(617) 548-1400
Worcester Foundation
for Experimental Biology ,
Shrewsbury, MA 01545
(617) 842-8921
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
).
Worcester, MA 01609
(617) 793~5286

>

;f~~r~iJr'l!Zlllt,f ·' ~:'~;~:
·Suffolk 1.J ·.
·

BOSTON HERALD AMERICAN
APRIL 30, 1982

,dedi0a\i0n, ·'.~
·
·(.,:;;-:'./. ',.: •:_;. ',.:J;

., · '8,'l/:f{C>lk .lJ'riive1:51ty. ,. wilL.,name. i.ts,. tecently

ApeijedJ2~story building at 8 Ashburtciri pl~ce
v.fofBoston businessman Frank Sawyer in dedi' ·fatfon ceremonies Thursday, on the 45th anni"':vers~ry-; of, receiving its university charter. '
t(: Sa:wy~. \vho started out as a. 25~cent-~n;'hour Bostqn cab driver;',wasJhe largest single
· ;: contributor to Suffolk's' Campaign for Excel•lence capjtal fund-raising drive. . ·
;. He fi:ninded the Boston Checker. Taxi Co. in
:1921 ;:lnd acquired tlie Avis Rent-a-Car System
in 1956.: He is how cochairman dflhe ,board of
Avis~:l#c .. art international.car and truck rental
compa:hy;
~
·
..
·
. ,_· J~e newly renovated building to~ d~dicated
·to $awyer has been the l:lom.e of the ,now defunct
Bo~t:tin ·cuy Club and later became the headq4a,tters of United Way of Massachusetts Bay,
' · Inc;s It houses the University's School of Manage·ment,. classrooms, a cafeteria, a computer. centi!iia'hd the four-level Mildred F. Sawyer Library,
iiii'med for Sawyer's wife.
·
The Charter 'oay c~~emohies will start at
1_2:15 p.m., with. educators and Boston and
· state officials, including Gov. Edward J. King"
· a.t\ending.

1ng ~ edicated
Franh Sauyer. f'O·L!tairman ()( A~ ts, Im alld founder of Chec/.:er Taxi
Cu., JPeal:s at the acd!ca~wn of the neu.· .','uffnlh r..:nicersit_v building at
8 Asnburton Place Tne /ac,ht_v 1n1.<: named in S.auyer's honur

BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE
BOSTON, MA
AUG. 29, 1982

:~1/.'.

f-

.. ~.

\t

·-

.;',"t:~.·.~···"

. / : .; ·-- -.·;,

· •_,.Suf{9lk Jlp.iv.ersit;y-~oreij,
t;_N• •!i'li,i-t§t],-~iai\i-;oa pf. C~,~~!li¥et,sity
.
-~,~--~- om~r.s (N.l\cuaor a-n.d theilU&!Steel .
Founda6011 as tlJ.~· r . '
of
pr~~. grl:l.m;> desig11ed ,to re.
Cl-8c~l:\S pperating

'!ri1l?~~tiv~.

- costs.. . -~

.

'

r.:. ___.

--· .

Suf(blk saved $67 ,OQO last year through in~
stallation of a microw;ave system connecting
fourvnajor buildings d(rectly to a private electronic stored program' telephone switch. The
university was one of 35 winners in the seventh
aI\1nual cost reduction• incentive awards program sponsorecl jointly 'bY NACUBO and USSF.
The cost of savings w~re realized in tQe university py not having to pay for the installation
of expensive underground conduits.
In .Other news at Suffoft<:. the university has
received a grant ~f.$'(8,400 from the Qepartment of Education fof Publj.c Service Fellow~
ships in ithe Mast~r in, Public Admini~trat~n
program, Dr,. Richard l,,. McDowell, dean ofthe,
School of ManagemMt}aiinouq¢~.
-.

8AV STATE BANNER
ROXBURY, MA.

w.

11,000

MAY 201982

New
England
Ne'Wllcli,

BOSTON SUBY I.II

Suffolk library. receives
maior black ·history collection

BO~MA
S.6

APR 26 \982
~-·

1,'

..

'

1Suffolk U
,dediCation
/,'

./f Suffolk

-

-

'

'

.

Su~niversity hits receiv.ed
on loan $2100 worth of books and
microfilm dealing with black
American history for the Collection of Afro-American Literature
housed at the university's
Mildred F. Sawyer Library.
The material was presented by
the National Park Service and includes a 41-volume work entitled
The American Slave: A Composite
Autobiography with George P.
Rawick, general editor. The books
are composed of oral hi~tories of
ex-slaves and reveal personal

stories and reminiscences of lite
under slavery. Seventeen reels of
microfilm exhibit the integral role
of black Americans in the antislavery crusade documented in
correspondence, speeches,
essays, pamphlets, reform
newspapers and journals.
The Collection of Afro-American
Literature is a joint project of Suffolk University and the Museum
of Afro-American• ·History. The
cooperative project, initiated 11
years ago, aims to collect black
American literature and bring
writers to speak. The collection
includes poetry, drama, fiction,
and non-fiction prose of all important black American writers from
the eighteenth century to the present. It contains related
historical, literary historical,
critical, biographical, and
bibliographical works by writers
_of ai!_r:~cf3s, as well as periodicals.

University will · name its recently
opened 12-story building at 8 Ashburton place
for Boston businessman Frank Sawyer in dedi:eation'ceremonies Thursday, on the 45th anni·\rersary of receiving its university charter.
'i
. Sawyer, who started,'. out as a 25-cent-anhour Boston cab drlver,;'was the largest single
contributor to Suffolk's Campaign for Excel-Jenee capital fund-raisiq.g drive.
. :/
He founded the Boston Checker Taxi Co. in
MABCHUSETTS
1921 and acquired the,,Avis Reht-acCi;tr System
lAWYERS WEEKLY
in 1956. He is now cochairman of the board of
BOSTON, MA.
Avis, Inc., an international car and'truck rental
W.14.000
company.
, The newly renovated building to be dedicated
to Sawyer has been the home of th€! now defunct
Boston City Club and later became the headNewsc:Iip
quarters of United Way of Massachusetts Bay,
Inc. It houses t1 ..~ University's School of Management,....classrooms; a cafeteria, a_ computer center aria the four-level Mildred F. Sawyer Library,
named for Sawyer's wife.
SWfolk University will name a new law liSuffolk !,>pent nearly $10 million to renovate brary for Flfirida attorney E. Albert Pallot,
the buiiding, which was built i~ 1915. .
, retiring president, chairman of the board
The Charter Day ceremonies will start at and chief executive officer of the Biscayne
12:15. p.m., iwith educators arn;l Boston and Federal Savings and Loan Association in
state officials, ,including Gqv. Edward J_. King. Miami, Florida. Pallot is a member of the

attending. .
50th year graduating class of Suffolk UniJohn $.,,Howe, chairman of the Suffolk Uni- versity Law School.
;, ~
versity Boar.a of Trustees, and University President Daniel H. Perlman will presid~ at the ceremonies n;tarking the. 45th anniversar.y .of the
legislative act that granted a university charter
to Suffolk. Suffolk was founded as an evening.
law sclfool in 1906.
\ f

OCT 2 51982

According to Suffolk University
professor of English, Edward
Clark, "It is an effort of two institutions of predominantly dif·
ferent races to carry on a joint
project in black culture, and
literature in particular."
The National Park Service came
to Boston, established the Boston
National Historical Park, and
entered a cooperative agreement
with various institutions along the
Freedom Trail, including the
Charlestown Navy Yard, to
relocate into the historic sites,
buildings and monuments to provide a more comprehensive exhibition of the history of Boston.
In 1980. a second unit of the
park was established ··· a black
urban park ··- The Boston African
American National Historic Site
consisting of a set of buildings
and monuments on or near
Beacon Hill.

·stlifolk 'l'o D~dicat~ N~~ Lllir~ \X
The library will be officially dedicated Oct.
21 at 3 p.m. with Pallot and his"family oil hand

for the ceremonies. Pallot received his J.D.
from Suffolk in 1932 and also was awarded an
honorary doctor of laws degree in 1978.
The Pallot Library will contain a basic
collection of citation material and will include three. faculty-student conference
video '
rooms containing multi-media
equipment microform.
Pallot founded the Biscayne Federal Savings and Loan Association 26 years ago. He
has lectured at the University of Miami Law
School and devoted much of his career(to
community work, foundjng the Mt. Sinai
Hospital and Medical Cellter in Miami Beach
and the Papanicolaou Cancer Research Institute of Miami, Inc.

and

WATERTUWN PRESS
WATERTOWNa MA.
w. 5.'lDll
NeW
ngJ.amJ
.i /} J!,
.•.
:'Jj«fr{... ,l/_Newsclip

SErt(1...A. .,1002
9
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~

MASSACHUSETTS
LAWYERS WEEKLY
BOSTON, HA

i

Suffolk; 'St&rts" New Center
For Continuing Education
Suffolk ·unixersity Law School has initiated a Center for Continuing Professional
Development in response to a recommendation of the SJC's Special Committee·on Legal
Education that law schools become more involved in continuing education for lawyers,
according to Professor Charles Kindregan,
chairman of the Center. .
1
The Center will present approximately
five seminars during the year on special
subjects of interest to lawyers. The Center
will also co-sponsor some programs with the
Massachusetts Academy of Trial Attorneys,
said Kindregan.
The first Suffolk program will be held
November 6, "Workshop on Computers and
the Law.',The program will be in two parts:·
an intensive workshop on how to apply computers to legal practice; and an exhibition of
types of computers, for both law offices and
law libraries, which will be open to the public, said Kindregan.
The workshop is designed to introduce the
general practitioner to the potential of computer, usage in the small t-0 medium sized law
office, and is intended not only for attorneys,
but also for experienced office managers,
. law librarians, and parale@lls. Topics cov0

r

.

>.;•.•.

--

Suffolk names Kelley
to development post

SEPT. 13, 1982

~

-

ered will include how computers operate, becoming "user friendly" with computers,
computer. contracts, hands-on demonstrations of computer programs with at least
seven manufacturers represented, legal research using Lexis and Westlaw, Td a review of law office softwear.
.
- Faculty include Suffolk Law School Professors Edward J. Bander and Jason
Mirabito, Don Mikei,, Director, Instructional
Media, Suffolk Law School, and Michael A.
West of the Joint Legislative Committee on
Education.
·
In February the Center will present a twoday seminar on "U.S. Income Tax of Foreign
Income and Persons," of interest to lawyers
or •certified public accountants who serve
resident and non-resident aliens and foreign
and domestic corporate clients. A two-day ·
program on "Products Liability" will be held
in March. Other seminars will be held in the
areas of Family Law and Property Law later'
next year.
. For further information, contact the Center for Continuing Professional Education,
Suffolk University Law School, (617) 7234700.

e

joseph M. Kelley of
Watertown has been ap·
pointed director of development at Suffolk University,
President Daniel H
Perlman announced today.
A veteran of 25 years in
the fundraising, develop·
ment and marketing fields,
,Ke}le_y wil.l coordinat~ the
NM.v'efs1ty'$ development,
aluirihi and public rel~tions
progriffils and head up a
major gift solicitation.
In announcing the, appointment, President
Perlman said, "Mr. Kelley
served on the University's .
,
development staff last fall
) during the capital 'Cam- their home on Standish
paign for Excellence' and Road with their eight
was gr~atly instrumental in children
the success of the campaign. Under his Ieadership·r
and with the assistance of\
the trustees and alumni, we
anticipate
greatly
strengthening the developnient and institutional advancement role at ~folk..;
University."
'· · .
Kelley served as director
of alumni giving at Boston
College for nine-years, playing a major role in the fiveyear "New Heights Ad·
vi:incement Campaign." He
later was director of
development for the Ar·
chdiocese of Boston, supervising a campaign which
raised $2 million in pledges.
Most recently, he was director of The Capital Cam- ,
paign at Northeastern
University ..
A native of Boston, Kelley
received a bachelor of arts
degree in 1957 from Boston
College, and prior to enter·
ing fundraising, he had extensive experience i~ the
sales and marketing fields
He is an active member of
the Boston Colege Alumni
Association, where he continues to serve on his Class
of '57 Gift Committee.
At the Archdiocese of
Boston, on a voh,mteer
basis, he works on behalf of
Por Cristo, a medicalmissionary program which
complements the. activities
· of The Society of St. James
the Apostle in South
America. He is also active
in programs serving the
1

JJVIJ .L Vl.",

l.l.t'i

to development post

SEPT. 13, 1982

Siiffollt tSfarts: New Center
For Continuing Education
ered will include how computers operate, beSuffolk 'Unh:ersity Law School has inicoming "user friendly" with computers,
tiafed a Center for Continuing Professional
Development in response to a recommenda- · computer. contracts, hands-on demonstrations of computer programs with at least
tion of the SJC' s Special Committee on Legal
seven manufacturers represented, legal reEducation that law schools become more insearch using Lexis and Westlaw, lfd a revolved in continuing education for lawyers,
view of law office softwear.
. according to Professor Charles Kindregan,
- Faculty include Suffolk Law ·School Prochairman of the Center.
1
The Center will present approximately fessors Edward J. Bander and Jason
Mirabito, Don Mikes, Director, Instructional
five seminars during the year on special
subjects of interest to lawyers. The Center Media, Suffolk Law School, and Michael A.
will also co-sponsor some programs with the
West of the Joint Legislative Committee on
Education.
·
Massachusetts Academy of Trial Attorneys,
said Kindregan.
In February the Center will present a twoThe first Suffolk program will be held day seminar on "U.S. Income Tax of Foreign
November 6, "Workshop on Computers and Income and Persons," of interest to lawyers
the LaW.'!The program will be in two parts:
or •certified public accountants who serve
an intensive workshop on how to apply com- resident and non-resident aliens and foreign
puters to legal practice; and an exhibition of and domestic corporate clients. A two-day
types of computers, for both law offices and program on "Products Liability" will be held
law libraries, which will be open to the pub- in March. Other seminars will be held in the
areas of Family Law: and Property Law later·
lic, said Kindregan.
The workshop is designed to introduce the next year.
general practitioner to the potential of co.m- . For further informatiol}, contact the Cenputer- usage in the small to medium sized law ter for Continuing Professional Education,
office, and is intended not only for attorneys,
Suffolk University Law School, (617) 723but also for experienced office managers,
4700.
law librarians, and paraleg11ls. Topics cov0

~

r

...

,-:.• .

0

joseph M. Kelley of
Watertown has been ap·
pointed director of development at Suffolk University,
President Daniel H
Perlman announced today.
A veteran of 25 years in
the fundraising, development and):narketing fields,
,Ke}le_y 'wi}l coordinat~ the
U~y'~isity's developJ?lent,
alumhj'.imd public relations
progriftlns and head 'up a
major gift solicitation. .
In announcing the appointment, President
Perlman said, "Mr. Kelley
served on the Uriiversity's .
development staff last fall
.
. ·
during the capital 'Cam- their home on Standish
)
paign for Excellence' and Road with their eight
was gr~atly instrumental in children
the success · of the campaign. Under his leadership I
and with the assistance orl
the trustees and alumni, we
anticipate
greatly
strengthening the developn:ient and institutional advancement role at ~folk j
University."
' · .
Kelley served as director
of alumni giving at Boston
College for nine-years, playing a major role in the fiveyear "New Heights Advancement Campaign " He
later was director of
development for the Archdiocese of Boston, supervising a campaign which
raised $2 million in pledges.
Most recently, he was director- of The Capital Cam- .
paign at Northeastern
University ..
A native of Boston, Kelley
received a bachelor of arts
degree in 1957 from Boston
College, and prior to entering fundraising, he had extensive experience in, the
sales and marketing fields
He is an active member of
the Boston Colege Alumni
Association, where he continues to serve on his Class
of '-57 Gift Committee
At the Archdiocese of
Boston, on a volunteer
basis, he works on behalf of
Por Cristo, a medicalmissionary program which
complements the activities
of The Society of St. James
the Apostle in South
America. He is also active
in programs serving the
handicapped and in the Of. fice of Spiritual Development.
·
1

'J

Kelley and his wife.
· Kathleen (Lyons), mai

---

tMR 18 1982

---

New

LEARNING NOTE$,.

En(Zland
N.,v,scli.-,

Foundation as :rhe re~ult of' innovative programs designed to reduce campus operatin_g
costs.
Suffolk -saved $67,000 last year through installation of a mic.rowave system connecting
four major buildings directly to a private electronic _stored program telephone switch. The
university was one of 35 winners in the seventh '
·annual cost reduc;tion · incentive awards program sponsored jointly by NACUBO and USSF.
The ~ost. of savings wer~ realized in the university by not having to pay for the installatiol).
of ex;>ensive miderground conduits.
. .'
In other news at fullfm_k, the university has
received a grant of $78,400 from the Depart:..
ment of Education for Public Service Fellow~
ships in .the Master'. in Public Administration
,program, Dr. Richard L. McDowell, dean of,the
School of Management announced.

!Honett Awarded'
~Contract for
~Suffolk U Project

"'~~,BOSTON ~ A $600,000 reno;"V·ation
project involving two of its Beacon.Hill.·
,nroperties is underway at r---""
Suffolk
t'(,
.
·• Ue,iaer§i!y.
·
;,~.+~ e work will be done by the Hollett
',Building Corp. of Wakefield, low bidder
':oii the project.
:,The project, designated as Phase 2B
Suffolk's $10 million Facilities
);l~velopment Program, calls for con,;Version of the one-time college library
::to-the E. Albert Pallot Library, which
·~~ill be a new wing of the Law School
. Library; the Edward Masterman Law
,Student Lounge; a new amphitheater
':c:iassroom; a faculty lounge; new of~
....fi~s for the Suffolk Law Review and
-the International Law Journal; new
_cp.rµputer science laboratories; additio.nal piology laboratories; and new
,classrooms. All of this construction is
:.111.the Archer Building.
:. . Wor~ in the Donahue Building in•:·V:olves renovation and expansion of the
.'i1~1versity;s Instructional Material,s
.C,~nter, and its exi~ting studio' and
,Jiculty and library offices.
~~;Extension of the Law School Library ·
'wiIJfµr,ther enhance what is. co~§,i~e..r~<i .,'
·on~ofthe\fiiiest law sdiool Iiorariesiif'" 1
the area. The law libr.ary has grown ·
• from 60,000 volumes to 160,000 volumes
"6\fer the past decade.
1
;-"' 1he new wing will be named in honqr
-·of'alummis E. Albert Pa1Iot, president
"arid chairman of the board of Biscayne
': Fe~eral Savings and Loan Assoeiation
:UfMiami, Florida. Pallot isa·member
'pff'this year's 50th anniversary dass
·:t~.D. '32).

1
·,;' 1°he library for the College of Liberal
-1ttts, located on the third floor of the Ar8
, jfier Building since 1938, has been mov~
:~<l into its new, 'four-level home· at 8
~~~burton pl, site of Suffolk's newly
·'o~ned 12-story building. It has been
named the Mildred Sawyer'Libtary in
;.;honor of the wife of Frank Sawyer, co. ;em_irmanofthe board of Avis~ Inc,, Suf'¥:dftc generous benefactor in its recentli
·- ~t6inpleted capital campaign::
1
c,-.ithe university's capital Campaign
1 fdr· Excellence, which had a . goalof
· t'$1,735,()90, went over the top by more
' ":tmin · 30 percent; closing ~ut · .cit
!~19,595: Sµcc_e~s of, the· campai~9 JP·
-~ed complebop. of the Facilities
:~e.velopment . ~rogra_m.. The n~\Vly •
'·~\10Vated 12-Story bmldmp nn A"hhn.._

)n ;'

~f:f

0 '•

,Su:ffglk Universitv ha:s been honored by the
Na~~,qal Asociation of College and University
Bu~t~l>!> Officers (NACYBO) and the us Steel
' ..,..
"'' -~-'I,

:,~'.

pro q.ttitude

-G{,,()1£

they were winning. I jumped up an~ down in the
stands and I caught a ball which John Mayberry threw."

New computer studies
at Suffolk University
.,

.'

-·Jbmrrience~ent ·e~cercises will be held fc;ir
setiidrs-.in the cooperative education program at
th~' W~ntworth Institute of· T~chnology, on
'. Suffolk University will offer two post-bacca- FriMY, Septen:iber 3, a:t 10 'a.m.;, at the Wentlaureate certificate programs in ~omputer sci:.. wo'"r}J1 tampus, 550 Huntington Ave., Boston.
en~e applications this falL The Physical and -App,f§~ima:tely 150. stud~nts will be receiving,di\ ·
Computer Science Applications Center (PCS~Pl plqm~'$. /
,
, .
. ;integrates computer sc~ence applicatio~s with
'f:rtle students, who altemated,semesters be-.
the disciplines of chemistry, mathematics and tweeri class/lab study and employment ih inphysics, while the Life Studies and Computer dustry during their junior an.d senior yeilrs~ will
Science Applications Certificate Program be)(wa'rded Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(LSCACP) ·blends a general bac!{ground in biol- TeEh;d&Iogy qegree1r .
. · ·,
-· ' .
cigy with computer science applications.
~fln other new's at Wentworth, registration for
: Both programs address. the need of liberal unct¢tgraduate engineering and industriartec1?,-;:
arts graduates for the technical experti~ re-: riofdgy programs begins tomorrow, Monday, A1;1°
quired to enter the computer science and data gu~'t .30. -Registration for upper class students 1s
\processing fields.
.
, • scheduled for Thursday, September 2. For more
1 .• ·.
Fot more information, contact Barbara . infurmatiort, call 442-9010. ·.• . :
. ·'.
GraBa, director of PCSACP, at 723~4:700, .
n
'ext.138,. dr Dt. Beatrice Sn9w, director of;
LSCACP at 723-4700, e*t. 245 .. :

--

.

'

.

1

1

<

BOSTON ~ A $600,000 reno,vation
project involving two of its B~acon Hill
.· .t~~operties is underway at ~uffJ$
• Ueifiier§i.ty.
; : :/r e work will be done by the Hollett
•:»uilding Corp. of Wakefield, low bidder
·:Oij the project.
·.,/J:he projed, designated as Phase 2B
Jn, Suffolk's $10 million· Facilities
:;t>,evelopment Program, <;alls for con.,version of the one-time college library
:.fo\he E. Albert Pallot Library, which
.:will be a new wing of the Law School
.tibtary; the Edward Masterman Law
;,Student Lounge; a-new amphitheater
. :cjassroom; a faculty lounge;•, new of.,fi~s for the Suffolk Law Review and
.the lnternationa(Law Journal; new
.,cpmputer science laboratories; addi. tjonal )>iology laboratories; and new
classrooms. All of this construction is
:fri'the Archer Building.
'. . Work in the Donahue Building in:·'volves ienovation and expansion of the
'.fu_i1versity's Instructional Material,s
c~nter, and its exi~ting studio and
){iculty and library offices.
:,~;,Extension of the Law School Library
\vii] further enhance What is, COJ}si~eJ~. . ,
·oniofthMinest law school libraries' in·· 1
the area. The law libr,ary has grown ·
· from 60,000 volumes to 160,000 volumes
t;clVer the past decade.
;-"'-',The new wing will be named in hon(?r
·'oftalumnus E. Albert Pallot, president
"'arid chairman of the board of Biscayne
·.,FeUeral Savings and Loan Asso<:iation
·t1i/Miami, Florida. Pallot is a member
"6f!'this year's 50th anniversary class
':~.a.o. '32).
>iMfhe library for the College of Liberal
·Xtfs, located on the third floor of the Ar. 8jfier Building since 1938, has been mov:id into its new, 'four-level home· at 8
;S\~burton pl, site of Suffolk's newly
. '•opiened 12-story building. It has been
named the Mildred Sawyer'Library in
;:htinor of the wife of Frank Sawyer, co. , c'ffllirman of the board oft\vis, Inc;, Suf1(Jnc generous benefactor in its recentli
· ·~oinpleted capital campaign: ·
·2
O"<'fhe university's capital .campaign
1
t.:it' Excellence, which had a goaJ
• f''$i',735,000, went over the top by more
· ':Hi~ri · 30 percent, closing out at
~~1~19,595~ Sµcc.e~s of, the campai~U jJl-~tired completion of the Fac1lrties
t.ff(fvelopment Program. The n~wly ..
"~iJovate9 12-sfory building on Ashbur'fufi pl was renovate_d at a cost ·of
$9,953,000.
·
';,:,Formerly the home of the defunct
·)Jo'Ston City Club and more recently the
-u~ited Way of Massachusetts Bay 1
·'Jifu., the building house.s the Suffollc
·trniversit)'. ~chool of Mana~~i.:nent,. a
-~afete-r{a,::a') computer· <center,
.. ~Pcfssrlfoms'faaminisffaliv~10Hf~s imtl
ti number of College Liberal~rts
an
"Sc'iences faculty offices.
.

-~-~---- .

..
I

•.

of

of

I

Foundation as the result of' innovative 'programs designed to reduce campus operating
costs.
Suffolk ,saved $67,000 last year through installation of a microwave system connecting
four major buildings directly to a private elec-.
tronic stored program telephone switch. The
uhiversity was one of 35 winners in the seven.th
'annual cost reduction -incentive awatds program sponsored jointly by NACUBO and USSF:
The ~o~t of savings wer~ realized in the university by not having to pay for toe installation
of ex'J)ensive underground conduits.
In other news at fuif[Qlk, the university has
received a grant of $78,400 from the :Depart"
ment of Education for Public Service Fellow~
ships in the Mast.er' in Public Administration
program, Dr. Richard L. McDowell, dean of,the
School of Management announced .

ltt·ollett Awarded
~Contract for
~Suffolk U Project

~;~!,,-1-_;-<

-

D -.

Suf{glk Universitv has been nonored by the
NaSf~gal Asociation of College and University
BuWJ~~s Officers (NAcyaoJ and the US Steel
~~~:;_y
;•~

:,.,:;

; ;~:,:,_ -:'I

pro ~ttitude
they were winning. I jumped up and_ down in the
stands and I caught a ball which John Mayberry threw."

New computer studies
Suffolk University

at
,/

1

(

·'cbmniencement 'excercisd will be held for
seriiors· in the cooperative education program at
th~·- \V~ntworth Institute of· T~chnology,, on
Fr!9ay_. Septen:iber 3, at 10 a.m .. , at the Wentwdtth -campus, 550 Huntington Ave., Boston.
--Appf~~imately 150. students will be receiving di-"
1
p!dffiq~. (
I
. ,
.. ;""""'_
'fftle ·students, who alternated· semesters between class/lab study and employment ih in- _
dustry during their junibr a.nd senior yef1-rS~ Will
be)st;wtrcted Bachelor of Science !n Engineerrn,g
Te.Ehnology degrees.' .

·
-· .
-· -:.fin other news at Wen,tworth, registration for
un!'.fftgradu~.te engineering and industriartech·, ~
no}tigy progrc1ms begins tomorrow; Monday, A1:1"
gu~'t .30. _Registration for upper class students 1s
,' . schedti;led for Thursday, September 2. For more
· inf.ormatiotl., call 442-9010.
·'

Suffolk University will offer two post-baccalaureate certificate programs in ~omputer sci:.
ence applications this falL The Physical and
Computer Science Applications Center (PCS~P)
integrates computer science applications with
the disciplines of chen1istry, mathematics and
physics, while the Life Studies and Computer
Science Applications Certificate Pr?gr~m
(LSCACP) blends a general bacl{ground m b10logy with computer science applications.
: Both programs address. the need of liberal
arts graduates for the technical experti~ required to enter the computer science and. data
1
processing fields.
_
.1• ··
Fot. more information, contact Barbara
Gralla, director Df PCSACP, at 723~4700,
-e:it.138,. dr · Dr: Beatrice Snow. director- of LSCACP at 723-4700, e*t. 245 ..:

n

Students pass up campus life to Sclve
By Laura White
Special to The Globe
· No-frills college education is a growing option taken by recent high school
graduates and those going back for degrees during this time of economic
crunch and cutbacks in student finan·
cial a1cf programs.
An increc1se in freshman enrollments at low-cost, private commuter
colleges suggests that many students
·are wi\ling to sacrifice some college experiences - on-campus living. social
and,sports activities -for practical academic p~c,grams more within their
,reach. financially and geographically.
, ,For·. exa.mple, schools, with tuition
under $5100 and accessible by the
MBi'A. 1such as Suffolk University on
Beacon Hill. Northeastern University.
Wentworth Institute. Wheelock College
ang Bentley College all report admls.sions are up'.
''Our freshman admissions, last
year. .were 518.students. 118 over t_he
previous year; So far. freshman depos. its are .up 18 perce~t over the same period last year." said Willliam Coughlin,
.director of admissions at Suffolk University. 'I;ultion .is $3630, the lowest
·among the: metropolitan' area private
· colleges surveyed.
Suffolk, located in a 12-story bqil9ing at 8. Ashburton Place on Beacon ffill
in the shadow of the State House and
McCormick Office Building, is within
walking distance of Government Center and Park Street MBTA stations.
"Parking isn't a. problem - there is
none," said Coughlin. laughing. "The
locahon, however, is desirable because
students have access to potential em. ployment at nearby public and private
. sector offices."
· The university has schools of liberal
arts. management and law with more

than 6200 students enrolled in day and
evening classes. What it doesn't have,
according to Coughlin, are some of the
more costly facilities: a sprawling campus. a student union. athletic fields and
stadium. The basketball team practices
at the Cambridge Y and the baseball
team plays on City of Boston fields.
"By omitting those facilities ,and
their maintenance and using the school
from 8 a.m. to IO p.m., we help keep a
relatively low overhead," said Coughlin.
Lois Sacco, 17. of Revere. an honors
graduate from Revere High School last
year, who will be entering Suffolk University in September. chose the school
for those reasons.
"I want to try to get a job in town at
one of_the banks or law ffrms near Suffolk. Right now, I'm working part-time
for two lawyers on State Street," said
Sacco. who ·works about 62 hours a
week on three different summer jobs: at
a dry cleaners, a shopping center and
the law firm.
"I don't feel I'm missing out on campus life. If I'm paying for my education.
I don't want to be tempted by good
times. There are the weekends and
school vacations for that. If I'm going to
invest $4000 in my brain I want to get
the most out of it," she said.
Linda Butler of Wakefield agrees.
Commuter education suits her needs.
Butler turned down a four-year scholarship at Merrimack College in North Andover to study engineering at Northeastern University's Boston campus where
she was given a scholarship for only
tqe freshman year. Tuition at Northeastern is $5100 for the engineering
and business administration schools .
"Next year, I'll be in the co-op program and will be alternating school
and work. Being on the car line I'll be

able to get to school and a job easily."
For students at Northeastern's Burlington campus, and for those who must
drive into Boston, the univ rsity en-:
courag~ car pooling by prov ding studeIJ,ts with a computer list of ther students from the 'same geogra hie location. And in Boston. pref~rre parking
spaces are reserved for car p lers.
Bentley College in Waltha • tuition
$5100; also offers reserved pitking for
car poolers.
r
"We have a housing sh6rtage ·on
campus, so we encourage s(udents to
commute," said Ed Gillis, direbtor of admissions.
1
Gillis adds the Waltham lo6ation. on
an MBTA bus route, is nearith~ high
tech area and offers students/potential
employment.
.
I
"Also, there seems to be al trend toward business degrees - students are
being more pragmatic. They ~ friends Suffolk Coordinator Phyllis Pesce extolls adyant~l
and other siblings with liberl;ll arts de- freshman Lois S~cco.
grees have more difficulty th the job
r-ture, computer science and eµgineering
market. so they're seeking degrees in
tei::Ji,nology - electronic, civil, mechani·
accounting, finance, computers."
Wheelock College and Wentworth cal and computer fields."
By comparison, Wheelocl,{ has a
Institute are also on MBTA car lines.
small enrollment of only 125 students.
Wentworth. on Huntitigtoh Avenue
near th~ Museum of Fine" A'.rts has 2350 Kathy Mercier of the student affairs ofstudents who commute out of 3026 'en- fice said commuter .eltudents have In-·
crea~ed and make.'4p a~out 30 percent
rolled in day classes.
"Our enrollments have had a steady of the enrollment. The school, located
10 percent increase in the last three on the Riverside MBTA line near the
years." said Susan Lerman. of Fenway area, specializes in ch~ldhood
Wentworth's admissions office. "Stu- studies to train people who work with
I
dents earn degrees called' BS in engi- young children either as teachers, soneering technology and prtpare for ca- , cial workers or in hospital eare.
i
reers in _building construction. architec-

BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE
BOSTON, MA
AUG. 1, 1982

Boston Sunday Globe

Aug. I, 1982

Af!,7

; up campus life to save
han 6200 students enrolled in day and
:vening classes. What it doesn't have,
tccording to Coughlin. are some of the
nore costly facilities: a sprawling cam1us, a student union, athletic fields and
tadium. The basketball team practices
t the Cambridge Y and the baseball
~a~ plays ?n. City of Bosto~ !i~lds.
. By ?m,ttmg those t:ac1hties ,and
1eir mamtenance and usmg the school
·om_ 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., ':';e help keep a
!latively low overhead, said Coughn.
Lois Sacco, 17, of Revere, an honors
·actuate from Revere High School last
'.ar, who will be entering Suffolk Uni!rsity in September, chose the school
r those reasons.
"I want to try to get a job in town at
te of _the banks or law fjrms near Suflk. Right now, I'm working part-time
r h.vo lawyers on State Street," said
,cco, who works about 62 hours a
!ek on three different summer jobs: at
dry cleaners, a shopping center and
e law firm.
"I don't feel I'm missing out on cams life. If I'm paying for my education,
lon't want to be tempted by good
1es. Ther~ are the wee~ends. and
1001 vacations for that. If I. m gomg to
•est $4000 in my brain I want to get
: most out of it," she said.
Linda Butler of Wakefie1d agrees.
nmuter education suits her needs.
tier turned down a four-year scholarpat Merrimack College in North An'er to. stud_y ~ngineering at Northeas1 Umve:s,ty s Boston campus where
was given a scholarship for only
freshman year. Tuition at Northtern is $5100 for the engineering
I business administration schools.
'Next year, r11 ·1;>e in the co-op pron and will be alternating school
work. Being on the car line I'll be

able to get to school and a job easily."
For students at Northeastern's Burlington campus, and for those who must
drive into Boston, the univ rsity en-.
courag~ car pooling by prov ding students with a computer list of ther students from the'same geogra hie location. And in Boston, preferre .parking
spaces are reserved for car p lers.
·
Bentley College in Waltha , tuition
$5100, also offers reserved pirking for
car poolers.

"We have a housing sh~rtage ·on
campus, so we encourage students to
commute," said Ed Gillis, direhor of admissions.
Gillis adds the Waltham lofation, on
an MBTA bus route, is neari.the high
tech area and offers studentslpotential
employment.
,
"Also, there seems to be a!trend toward business degrees - students are
being more pragmatic. They~ friends Suffolk Coordinator Phyllis· Pesce extolls ad-y:antag~s of city university in interview with
GLOBE PHOTO BY JACK O'CONNELL
and other siblings with liberil arts, de- freshman.Lois Sacco.
grees have more difficulty ip. the job
ture, computer sdence and ¢ngineering
market, so they're seeking degrees in
tei::hnology - electronic, civil, mechaniaccounting, finance, computers."
Wheefock College and Wentworth cal and computer fields."
By comparison, Wheelock has a
Institute are also on MBTA car lines.
Wentworth, on HuntiJ;igtoh Avenue small enrollment of only 125 students.
near tht Museum of Fine· A'."rts has 2350 Kathy Mercier of the student affairs ofstuder:lts who commute out of 3026,en- fice said commuter .Eltudents have increa$ed and makefap about 30 percent
rolled in day classes.
"Our enrollments have had a steady of the enrollment. The school, located
10 percent increase in the last three on the Riverside MBTA line near the
years,'' said Susan Lerman, of Fenway area, specializes in childhood
Wentworth's admissions office. "Stu- studies to train people who work with
dents earh degrees called' BS in engi- young children either as teachers, so~
neering technology and pr,epare for ca- , c_ial workers or in hospital eare.
reers in building construction, architec·
---·;;.."- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - , , . - - - - - - - - - - - - ~
1

BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE
BOSTON, MA
AUG. 1, 1982

6E.VERLY Tll'IIES
BEVERLY, MA.
11. 9.111
.Neff

!.DgJ.Wltl

-~acllll

rette excise tax to estabiish a ~ aid due to the low funding
stu~~nt qighE!r education as- level, the report said.
sistance'fund. ·
.
Vermont and New York
. _"Tile · ~tu,dy documents1 state scholarship programs ofwhat we had already been fer as much as $1,8po to needy
aware of," Perlman said.
applicants, and New Jersey
The 64-page report, spon: offers up to $2,600.
sored by the Board of Higher
Other gloomy conclusions"
Education and the Massachu- uncovered by the report indisetts Higher Education Assis- cate the already high annual
· Developing a state loan pro- tance Corp., stated th'at cost of attending public an(l
gram and expanding the hon- Massachusetts is 47th in per independent colleges is ex:>rs state scholarship program capita appropriations and pected to rise at a rate of 10 to
oy $2 million a year are also first in dependence on the in- 14 percent a year.
endorsed.
dependent .sector for higher . And even though students
·
are working more to contribNortheastern
University education.
President Kenneth. Ryder told .The state provides only ute to their own educational
a news conference "higher $2.86 per student in scholar- costs, and parents are paying
education. is drifting int!) an ship aid while the national a fair share, the gap between
.
average is $4.18, comparative available funds and financial
acute crisis."
Ryder emphasized the state figures indicate, with New need is growing.
role has become "increasingly York providing $15.17 per stuUse of student loans has
important with President,Rea- dent; · Vermont: $10.16; New grown from $35 million a year
gan's proposed drastic reduc- Jer~y, $5.97; and Rhode Is- in 1970 to $254 million in 1980,
tions in aid."
land;·$4.81.
with individual student indebtRyder and Suffolk U111iversi: ,:Pespite an enrollment of 56 edness averaging $3,500 per
QZ...President Daniel Perlman percent in private institutions borrower, the reptfrt said,
called on the legislature. to e_ompared with 22 percent na- adding that the figure could
pass' a bill tapping th~. ciga bonally; the account placed grow to $12,500 per student by
Massachusetts 16th in its sup~ 1985.
,
port for state scholarships.
The study noted enrollment
- ·
The state aid pi:ogram, re- in Massachusetts' higher eduan:o·N D·•i•v ITEI
ceiving· only minimal in- catio'1 will remain stable until
Cll 111
n "'
. creases in fundiqg .over the . 1983. Undergraduate numbers
CLINTON, M
last 10 years, awa:rd,s'belween may drop slowly but there will
a. 4.GOQ
$300 and $900 to eligiblf st\1- be more older and graduate,
I;~nts. with. onl_y-25·,pe~ent of students and those seeking
=d
~:_
qu~ified, applicants grant- ,specialized training,

By RUTH YOUNGBLOOD
UPI State House Reporter
"
· ·
BOSTON - Massachusetts
ranks almost at the bottom of
the United States in per capita
spending for higher educatiOlil
and educators warn of a wors~
ening crisis if the state does
not compensate for President
Reagan's proposed cutbacks.
An 18 month study released
Tuesday revealed that state
scholarship funding "has not
kept pace with inflation and
collegecosts."
The report found other
states such as New York, Vermont, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Rhode Island, with
~ignificant enrollments in the
mdependE:nt sector, fund their
scholarship programs far betterth~Ma~sachusetts:
!lmvers1ty ,presidents
hailed t!te study for finally documentmg what they already
knew·
. . .
The extensive, report rec-

ommends expanding the state
scholarship· program by · $10
million a year to teach a minimum of $65 million by 1986-87;
establishing a work-study and
job devE:lopment program,
and fundmg a program fQr
adult students preparing f.or
careers-in high demand jobs.
0

.1
0

lfR I S 1&82

Newsclin

Bottom of the heap

''

1

Stu~Y results on ed ucat4an, aJI .
;,i'~i>!~

Ry RUTH YOUNGB'LcfiJ:o ., .
enrollrnents ih 'the'''1hdeperid;nf.
gram by $2 million\ year :;;;/:
~a'~\~lready biii;i
UPI Statehouse Reporter
sector, fund their scholar:ship
also endorsed.
.,
of," Perlman said.
.
BOSTON (UPI) - Massaprograms far better than
Northeastern
University
'I'he 64apage report, spor
chusetts ranks almost at the
Massachusetts.
President Kenneth Ryder told a
by (J_l1e Board of H
bottom of the United States in
University presidents hailed
.news confererice ''higher 'educa~ >. ' Ed1:1iiation and the lVI
per capita spending for higher·
~.e study for fin~ly ,document"
tion is drifting into an acute
ch~~t~ fligh¢'r Educatio
education, and educators warn,
ing what they already knew.
crisis."·
,
sista'nce Corp.; stated
of a worsening crisis if the
The extensive report recomRyder emphasized the statE! .·
Mas'sa~hy~etti isi~7{8\i1
state does not compensate for
mends expanding the state
role· has become "increasingly
capi:ta appro~rjaJi<>ri§, a\l~
President Reagan's proposed
scholarship program by $10·
· important with President
iri d~~riqenct(orilpf i!i~E
cutbacks:
million a year to reash a··
Reagan;s proposed drastic re-'
· ent :sec'ti>l' for\ hig~~t educ
An l8 monih.,study released
minimµm of$65 million by 1986'ductions in aid."
;jijt!
.pj«:>vi1es ':OnlN
Tuesday revealed that state
87, establishing a work study
· .. ,,_R.y_',d.er and juffoik_ ·.University·.·.,·
· J)er "student- in·· scholarshi
scholarship funding "has not
and job developme11t pr~gram, .
P-res1dent - rTal\1el · Perlman .. ,·,·.
. ~9:ile ~b~..
:14:vet#
kept pace with inflation and
and fµnding , .a program for
call~d·: on the J:,egislature to
M.'il'l.3, tomp~tative Iigur
college costs.''
,
·adult., students prep,aring. for·pass a 9H~'tapping'the_ cigarette
<n~iteJ·with}'.N.~w; York .i:
The report found: ,otli~r st~.tes .
careers. in high demand jOQS. . .
,e~~is~:,,'q{;/ to ~sf:abliS~}:ll ,~tUdt:nt
j~~~·\,:~l'S;.,It? j,ef, ':. Stu
such~ 0New' Ye>~k,r.,Ver,m<)nt; ·
. Developing·. a ,st~te foan
_. ,big.her . edµcation. ;assistance
VetroQht,;:$\9.1W.; >New
Pennsylva,nia; 1'tew, ~e,r~y','f~ndr .· ,prograpi and, ~ncpanding the. · . fund < · , ' '" ·, ;~ . c;
$5~/~rid,:ffl)~d~, lsh1pd~';
Rhode Islan~,.. ··wit~lsJ~tjifi~l:int'. -, ... honors s.tate s.c;h'olarship pro~
~hat
_1?,~~~ '::~ ·e~iollpierif
.--....:-~
,-~~~~~;__...;;____...............--~~~.!!!"i!!~.~-~-,~,~.~.~~-~--~"•~!11!1!11"""',._................................................................
..
...
....
I

sta~

·rif~#~

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;0rN :'.~r--;,~~~~V~ .

:ition crisis predicted
I



ends.expanding the st.ate
arship· program by: $10
>n a year to reach a miniof $65 million by'1986-87;
ilishing a work-study arid
development program,
funding· a program for
students preparing f.9r
,rs in high deniand jobs.

rette excise tax to establish a
~tudent, l}ighE;r education assistance'fund.
...'.'Th,e stu,dy documents1
what we had already been
aware of," Perlman said.
The 64-page· report, spon~
sored by the Board of Higher
Education and the Massachusetts _
Higher Education Assisveloping a state loan pro- ta·nce Corp., stated th'at
and expanding the hon° Mas_sachusetts is 47th in per
ate scholarship program capita appropriations and
million a year are also first in dependence on the in'Sed.
depen~ent .sector for higher
rtheastern
University education.
·
The state provides only
dent Kenneth Ryder told
ws conference "higher $2._86 p~r stu!:lent in scholar1tion. is drifting into an ship aid while the national
i crisis."
i
8:verage is $4.18, comparatjve
·der emphasized the state figure~ indicate, with New
1as become "increasingly York providing $15.17 per sturtant with President Rea- dent; · Vermont/ $10.16; New
1 proposed drastic reduc- Jersey, $5.97; and Rhode Isin aid."
land, $4.81.
·
rder and Suffolk Universi: .:nespite an enrollment of 56
resident Daniel Pel'lm~'n percent in private institutions
d on the legislature.. to compared wi!h 22 percent na, a bill tapping the ciga" tionally, the account placed
Massachusetts 16th in its sup;
· - - - - - · - - port fo.r state sch9_1ilrs.hips.
_
The state aid· pr;ogram, receiving· only · ni\pimal increases in ftindiQg over the
last 10 years, awa:rds'between
$300 and $900 to eligible stuI .dents.with_ only ~5 pere'~1:1t of
l(Jhe qualified apphcants grant-

,··


~



'-

~ aid due to the low funding
level, the report said.
Vermont and New York
state scholarship programs offer as much as $1,8P<l to needy
applicants, and New Jersey
<.lffers up to $2,600.
Other gloomy conclusions"
uncovered by the report indi~ate the already high annual
cost of attending public am;I
independent colleges is expected to rise at a rate of 10 to
14 percent a year.
. And even though students
are working more to contribute to their own educational
cost~, and parents are paying
a fair share, the gap between
available funds and financial
need is growing.
. Use of student loans has
grown from $35 million a year
in 1970 to $254 million in 1980,
with individual student indebtedness averaging $3,500 per
borrower, the reptrrt said,
adding that the figure could
grow to $12,500 per student by
1985.
,.
_T.he stu_dy noted enrollment ·
in Massachusetts' higher educatio11 will remain stable until
1983. Undergraduate numbers
may drop slowly but there will
be more older and graduate
stud~nt_s and . t~ose seeking
specialIZed trammg.

< -

-

.

--------~ - - - -

Bottom of the heap

ly results on ed ucaJ4~11~~te/Ifele:afseCt
)tr'"
.er
lSSathe
s in
gher ·
varn,
the
for
osed

ased
;tate
not.
and·
\
ates ,
tont; .
ian:d :-

~iult.

'i~a":r~ ,,

enrollments in the 'Indeperident
gram by $2 million 'a year are
'' · w"e hal'.i · already b{~J'
;A,_ perderil '_iii "·privit~ 'itiititulons
sector', fund their scholarship
also endorsed.
bf," Perlman said.
i compared with 22, percent
programs far better . 'than
Northeastern
' University
The 64~page report.• sponsored .· . ilationally, _the acc~mnt placed
Massachusetts.
President Kenneth Ryder told a .
by '. 'the. Board of Higher
Massachusetts . f6th ' fn Its
University presidents hailed
news confererice "higher 'educa- \. Edu¢~tion and ,the l\tassa- •
suppott for state ;scholarships.'
tqe study for, finally ,document-.
tion is .drifting into an . acute
chus~tt~ _llighfr Educatio11 As-·'
Th.e state aid program,
ing what they already knew.
crisis."
sist&'nee Corp.;.c stated that
rece_ iv,_:ing_/j_>nly __ minima-I inThe extensive report recomRyder emphasized the state
Mas~aGru,setis is '17H(i,i;i per.
creases iI7 funding over the last
mends expanding the state
role • has · become "increasingly
capjfa . approprJaJion~ . ai;id. f~i'st
10 years, awards 'between $300
SGholarship program by $10
important. with President
iri de~ngenc¢ oh the· iQqepend>
<aqd $90fl to eligible. students
million a . year to rea~h a.
Reagan's proposed drastic reent sec'.tor for' higher education'. . with ..<>ply _ percent . of. th£ ,
25
minimum 0£ $65 million by 1986'ductions in aid." .
.
.
,:r~e state PfQVides 'oncy .~2]3'6 ··
qmtlif:ieJi applicants,grante,g atd
8'i'; establishing a work-study
,RY,~er and uffolk University 1~;sWde~t ~ttsch6lar~hip aid
_du~ ~~{!he· ~ow funding')evel, ·
and job developmerit program, .
President · . an,1el Pedman .·
wJ,;He ~e, n~t~~~~t.avet'age. .is
,the_··:.rr... O_.rt said._;,, _.
____ .eo_,··
__
:,~_-,/·. 1 .
and · funding ..a -progr!lm for
called <>n the Legislature to
. i4g8,JowP~i;ati:ye figure$ itj"

adult ,'students preiiaring for'- ' : pass a
tappirig}t,he, cjgarette
m¢~Je,iwftli/New Y()rk prbvi<i-.
' .. ~¢1:'ID()Ilt and Ne~ Yoftk' state
Gareersjn high demand jobs.
, e?r<;is~:~\:X/ t~ establish.;a student
ih~- '•,$15; i'li'. per ' student';
's1ijlarship' pr<>grams.,/Qtf~r as .
Developing· a , sfa,te loan
higher' ,·edµGation assistance
v'~tinont,;:$),~.116; New Jirsey,,
yi Ar as. $1,800 ,'to; needy
,program and , expanding the, ~J!if_d.
. . . .. . .
.
$5:1)7f\'~nq•){!i?d~ Isl!l_nd, lf4.8J.. ,
. Jcants; and_-; Ji~~~>, Jer~ey
honors state s.Gh<il,arship pro- .
.what
li)esgjte ·-~ ~nrqilI'rl¢nt of 56
\!:!,UP Jo. $2,6¢,./,(.,
·
I

6

w~

-

.; t.

~

, .•• ~..

. '

.

, '

.

. .. ,

.

PROVIDENCE JOURNAL

NEWPORT DAILY NEWS
NEWPORT, RI.

o.

PKUVIDENCE. R.I..

15.000

p_, 72,0lQ
Aew

~··
c-Higher education:
!l!,D&!!:illd!

t'Qe'ft

me~cDI

pigiu.uCI

tu~~- ..... ' .-~-. .

"higher education is drifting into an
acute crisis."
'.
Ryder emphasized the state role has
become "increasingly important with
President R_eagan's propos~d drastic
reductions in aid."
Ryder and Suffolk Universi~ President Daniel Perlman called on the
Legislature to pass a bill tapping the
cigarette excise tax to establish a student higher education assistance fund.
"The study documents what.we had
already been aware of," Perlman said.
. The 64-page report, sponsored by
the Board of Higher Education and the
_ Mas~achusetts Higher Education
Assistance Corp., stated. that
Massachusetts is 47th in per capita appropriations and first in dependence on
the independent sector for higher
education.
The state provides only $2.86 per student 'in scholarship aid while the national average is $4.18, comparative
figures indicate, with New York providing $15.17 per student; Vermont,
$10.16; New Jersey, $5.97; and Rhode
Island, $4.81.
Despite an enrollnl.ent of 56 percent
in private institutions compared with
22 percent nationally, the account plac~
: ed Massachusetts 16th in its support
for state scholarships.
The state aid program, receiving only minimal· increases in funding over

' By.RUTJIYOUNGBLOOD
.. . '
UPI Writer '
· BOSTON - Massachusetts ranks
almost at the bottom of the United
States in per capita spending for
higher education, and educators warn
· of a worsening crisis if the state does
. not compensate for. President
• Reagan's proposed cµtbacks.
.· .·. An .1_8-month ·study released. Tue~day · revealed that state scholarship·
funding ''has not kept pace with inflation. and college costs."
· The· rep()rt found other states such
· as New York, Vermont, Pennsylvania,
New Jersey and Rhode Islanq, with
significant enrollments. in the independent sector, fund their scholarship programs far better than Mas~achusetts.
· University presidents· hailed. the
study' for. finally documenting what
they already knew.
The extensive report recommends
expanding the stat~ scholarship program by $10' million a year to reach a
minimum of $65 million by 1986-87;
establishing a work~study and job
deyelopment program, and funding a
· program for adult students preparing
for careers in high demand jobs.
, · D~veloping a state loan program
and,·expanding the_ honors state
•, scholarship program by $2 xnillion a
· year are also endorsed.
.Northeastern University President
Kenneth Ryder told a news conference
-.:__.

.

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u

'd'

H

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A
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~~
::r::
zz

00
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Cf.l Cf.l

00
i:Q i:Q

Q;

a
'l

rz
µ:l
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co
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r-l

~
..-

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2

Bay State among_
worst in spei;,ding

!

the last 10 years, awards between $300'
and $900 to eligible students with only
25 percent of the qualified applicants
granted aid due to the low funding
level, the report said.
Vermont and New York state
scholarship programs offer as much as
$1,800 to needy applicants, and New
Jersey offers up to $2,600.
Other gloomy conclusions uncovered by-the report indicate the
already high annual cost of attending
public and independ~t colleges is expected to 'rise at a rat~ of 10 to 14 per.
cent a year.
And even though students are working more to contribute to their own
educational costs, and parents are
paying a fair share, the gap between
available funds and financial need is
growing. - ·
use of student loans has grown from
$35 million a year in' 1970 to $254 million
in .1980, with individual student indebtedness averaging $3,500 per borrower, the report said, adding that the
figure could grow to $12,500 per student
by 1985.
.
The study noted enrollment in
Massachusetts' higher education will
remain stable until 1'983.
Undergraduate numbers may clrop
slowly but there will be more older-and
graduate students and those seeking
specialized training.

BOSTffl GLOBE
BOSTON, ;MA,.

u.--

- ~~------ - :::)

'

aid
By R.S. Kindleberger ,
"Mass~cht1sett:s riot.pniy has
.Globe Staff
·
the high~tpercenfage of its enroll.
· Only one quarter of eligible - ment in, th,e fndependent sector,'\
Massachusetts students received the study'goeson, ''btitth~e instistate student aid last year. and in tutions have seating capacity
,smaller amounts than in compara- which makes. iVunneces$ary to exbl!! states, according to a study re- pand our public sector further.
That independ¢i;:it ~cfor capacity,
leased yesterday.
: : The study calls for a massive'in" however, cannot be reacl.ilyaccessi-,
c{ease in state financial aid for ble to students if they cannot meet
·
Massachusetts college students to independent college costs."
-offset federal cuts and make up for
Two coIIege presidents, Kenneth
years of inflation.
Ryder of Northeastern University
-: :: The study, co~ponsored by the
state Board of Higher Educ·ation and Daniel H, Perlman of Suffolk.
(riow the Board of Regents) and the said the study was partiCularly
M:assachusetts Higher Education timely in view· of tI:ie proposed fed~
.l\:Ss.istance Corp .. was released yes- era! cuts .
terday at a press conference at SufRyder said the study provides a
' f:oik University.
"scholarly justification" for a
: ·:: "Massachusetts needs to ex- Massachusetts Senate proposal to
, JJ!ind its relative effort iri state ap- increase state aid for college stupropriations for student grant as- dents from its current level of $15,
: Sistance, '' the study d~lares.
million by another $28 million
':,:."Comparable stirtes;· .such as through an increase in state taxes
~bode Island,, Vermont, New York. on cigarettes .
•New Jersey, P~nnsylvania and Illiqois, do far better at funding their
Said Pearlman: "It is alarming
~ate · grant programs tl}.an does to note thaf there is a 15-tos 1 loan
· -~
Massachusetts.
~~ grant ratio. That means we are
'
;

~

~

1

imposing .on me 'students ·of this
state ap. ,erim;jnous burden of debt
by thelfinethey~graduate from coF
Iege and even · more by the. time
they graduate from prcffessional
schooL
_
In ~dditiori to recommending a
$10°mUlion-a,~year increase in state
s_cholarship funds uritil they rea,ch
$65. million. the study calls for establish)ng. state work-study and
:'subsid)zed · loan programs. lt als.o
Calls for creating a special program
to benefit older students and to pro·vide funds for outst ' in st'u
dents..

.

~

18£.su•w
MA

FEB 7 &rl

NeW!

ei:~i

suff~lk U~v.-P~-flllllraising goof'
Suffolk tjrirver~ity has exceeded by 31 per- - non st., which forl,llerly housed .the school of
cce:lft its Campaign fin' Excellence goal. The 76- Dlanagement, were sold for reconversi~n to, r~iyear~ld university on Beacon Hill. which was dential'use and returned to the city's t~x rolls in
founcjed in 1906 as an evening law school.• now accordance with a promi~ made to Beacon Hill
serves 6100 students faking day and night . 11e!ghbors by Suffolk President Daniel H. Perl,courses in its Jaw school. college of liberal arts man.
and sciences and its school of management;
Gifts to Stjffolk during the campaign, 'fhich
}Vas organized by John S. Howe, includ,e a
i
The current campaign, launched in Decem~ $250,000 challenge grant from the Kresge Foun· ber, 1979, raised $3.6 million towards long.: dation, Troy, Mich.; $150,000 from the Hayden
range fi11ancing of the ilriiversity's $10. million Foundation of New York and $75,000 from the
F~cilities Development Program. Funds .will ~ermanent Charity Fund of Boston.
make possible the rehabilitation of Suffolk's · Alumni pledged $1.1 million during 26 even. new 12~tory building at 8 Ashburtpn pl., hous- ,ng "phonathons."
.
ing the school of management, the Mildred ~wMajo_r gifts from individual benefactors total
yer Library; classrooms, offices, a ~omputer cen- · $1,526,000 given by Frank Sawyer, Esther, E.
l ter and a cafeteria, - .
.Spillane, Stephen P. Mugar, E. Albert Pallot, Ida
Green, and Judge c. Edward R ~
The two
at
and 47\Mt:. yer" and
\

tot~hoiises 45

CecH

0

.

BOSTON SUNDAY. GLOBE
BOSTON, MA

s.

606,389

flteW

OEC 12 \982

~
Ne,nelip

LEARNING NOTES
Emmanuel College has announced that ap:plications are now being accepted through Dec.
:18, for the college's annual Scholarship Competition for Women. The competition is designed
to recognize academic scholars through comple' tion of an essay or project in one of three aca. demic fields: English, science or social science.
The college is offering scholarship awards to
-the top four fin'alists in eacli of the three areas.
First prize winners in each field will receive a
four-year, full-tuition scholarship to Emmanuel.
:Two second prize winners· in .each group will be
awarded a, $1000 freshman year scholarship
and the third prize winners will receive a $500
freshman -year scholarship. Finalists and winners will be selected 0n the basis of performance
in the competition as well as overall academic
acheivement.
'. For further information, or to receive an ap'p1ication contact the Admissions Office, Em~
'manuel Co\lege, Boston, 0,2115,. 277-9340; ext.

resources tor Laboure's program, established
last year in consortium with the Department of
Therapeutic Radiology at Tufts-New England
MedicalCenter in Boston.
Varian Associates is a leading manufacturer
of linear accelerators, specialized radiation-producing machines used in administering theraputic radiation treatments.
,

such areas as CAD/CAM, i;omputer graphic!
computer security and engineering.
·
With the installation of the new·system, th
college will have a total of 60 student-user term
nals; two years ago, onJy four terminals wer
available for student instruction.

D

Tp,e Tuskegee Airmen Scholarship Fund an
nounced that Gret~he~ Crowley, Class o
1982, Fundamental House, Cambridge Rindge t
Latin School, has been awarded a $1000 schol
arship. The Tuskegee Ainn~ awarded scholar
ships of $1000 each to 15 high school graduat~:
of 1982 nationwide, without regard to race
creed, color or national origin.

The Analog Devices Graduate Research Fellowship has been established at Dartmouth
College's Thayer S,chool of Engt:rieerlng: Analog
Devices, of Norwood, has p~nted ~rl F. ·
Long, dean of Thayer School, )vith the first of
three $25,000 payments to be':fuade over three
years to suppQrt -the programi! The f~Howship
wiJI support teaching and research of junior faculty and graduate research a$istants in electronics and computer er1gtneerfilg sciences.

D

_;c,.

;:

D

D
Plymouth State College in New Hampshir
is offering a new liberal arts major to prepar
for careers in higher education, governmenl
, public service, museum work or graduate study
The new interdisciplinary degree is in medl
eval studies - an examination of the art, histo
ry, language; 111usic and philosophy of Europe
_ S\)Ciety from the colJapse of the Roman Em
an
pire in the mid-fifth century to the middle of th•
16th century. For more information can (603

A VAX .11/750 high ~rforqiance. computer
system has been donatedto Westfield State
College by Digital Equipment Corporation.
D
The new. system complements an Jn~house
. The SIJ,ffolk_yw School has established a
Center for Continuing Professional Develop-· Wang VS 80 computer system and two Control
:ment for practicing attorneys featuring one-day Data Corporation Cyber 172 mainframes which
colloquia on recent legal developments and _serve the Massachusetts State College System.
.multi-day institutes. Chairing the Center will be · This will allow the colJege to proceed with development of computer programs .which address 536-1550.
Suffolk Law Professor Charles Kindregan.
• Participants will be provided with in~depth
!examination of legal developments in all pro$aros d_~§igned to rrieet tht intellectual needs oL
' the practicing lawyer.
_
·
115, 116.

D
, The Computer Forum in Newton Centre of1fers education for users of desktop computers
'used for business and home.
! • The curriculum ranges from computer literacy to financial applications, business graphics
:and data bases. The curriculum approaches the
·computer as a tool and an aid in decision-mak'ing and problem solving. Courses deal primarily
with the use of packaged software and focus
more on practical rather than theoretical appli'cations. For more information call 244-0080.

D
Wheaton College has received a $175,000
.challenge grant from the William and Flora
Hewlett and Andrew W. Mellon Foundations to
· establish an endowed presidential discetionary
fund, primarily for faculty and curriculum development. The money will be used for institu- ,
ti!)na1 renewal projects. including curriculum
. development; racu1ty research. study and trave1. ·

ev · '-w---8·
18

suff 0 Ik.·Ca m pa·Ig n
- - ----- -

,
D
has reached a total of $3.6 Temple Street near the State House.
Laboure Junior College has been awarded n or 31 percent :above its goal.
Perlman said the two-year "Cam'a $1000 grant from Varian Associates, Inc. in
comprehensJye Facilities
support of the college's Radiation Therapy opement Progr1Uil at the 6,100 paign for Excellence," launched in
Technology Program.
_ t institution includes the com- December of 1979, brought in 'more
[ The grant will be used for developing library rehabHitation -of; Suffolk's new than 2,600 pledges from alumni aqd
:____ _....;....;..__ _ _,_.._.,....._ _....;..._ _,,____
building on Ashburton Place, friends including support from ti¢·'
- ; tma.ricfrig -of- t~- untversity's $lo builtfo 1915, and partial renovation of corporate and philanthropic com;:
milli_on f aci~ties D~~~lopem~r Pro- the Donahtie,!'.1~~~ f~.t~er buildings on munity.

'L

BOSTON SUNDAY. GLOBE
BOSTON, MA

s.

606,3.89
fl(eW

OEC 12,982

Eng•ent!
Ne*9clii;
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LE4RNING NOTES
'Emmanuel College has announced that ap. plications are now being accepted through Dec.
.18, for the college's annual Scholarship Competition for Women. The competition is designed
to recognize academic scholars through comple1 tion of an essay or project in one of three academic fields: English, science or social science.
The college is offering scholarship awards to
the top four fin'alists in each of the three area.s.
First prize winners in each field will receive a
.four-year, full-tuition scholarship to Emmanuel.
:Two second prize winners· in .each group will be
awarded a $1000 freshman year scholarship
and the third prize winners will receive a $500
freshman .year scholarship. Finalists and w.inhers will be selected an the basis of performance.
in the competition as well as overall academic..

resources tor Laboure's program, established
last year in consortium with the Department of
Therapeutic Radiology at Tufts-New Engiand
Medical Center in Boston.
Varian Associates is a leading manufacturer
of linear accelerators, specialized radiation-producing machines used in administering theraputic radiation treatments.
.

such areas as CAD/CAM, ~omputer graphic!
computer security _and engineering.
With the installation of the new,system, th
college will have a total of 60 student-user term
nals; two years ago, bn!y four terminals wer
available for student instruction.

D

The Tuskegee Airmen Scholarship Fund an
nounced that Gret~he~ Crowley, Class o
1982, Fundamental House, Cambridge Rindge t
Latin School, has been awarded a $1000 schol
arship. The Tuskegee Ainu~ awarded scholar
ships of $1000 each to 15 high school graduate:
of 1982 nationwide, without regard to race
creed, color or national origin.

The Analog Devices Graduate Research Fellowship has been established at Dartmouth
College's Thayer S,chool of Engineering. Analog
Devices, of Norwood, has p¢sented ~rl F.
Long, dean of Thayer School, '~ith. the first of
three $25,000 payments to be':made over three
years to suppqrt the program.' The f~Howship
will support teaching and research of junior faculty and graduate research a$istants in electronics and computer er1gtneert~g sciences.

D ";, .

;,

D

D
Plymouth State College in New Hampshir
is offering a new liberal arts major to prepar
for careers in higher education, governmenl
. public service, museum work or graduate study
The new interdisciplinary degree is in medl
eval studies -,- an examination of the art, histo
ry. language; music and philosophy of Europe
an s,;x:iety from the collapse of the Roman Em
pire in the mid-fifth century to the middle of th«
16th century. For more information call (603

A VAX .11/750 high ~tfonµance computer
system has been donated to Westfield State
College byDigttal Equipntent Corporation.
The new, system complements an .in-house
Wang VS 80 computer system and two Control
Data Corporation Cyber 172 mainframes which
serve the Massachusetts State ¢allege System.
This will allow the college to proceed with development of computer programs .rwhich address 536-1550.

-------

NEWS-TRIBURE

WALTHAM, MA.

.-, 15.360

FE81

a 1982

New
England
~"'!'?;-ecit;.

N!3wton's Perlman reviews Suffolk· campaign
BO~TON - Suffolk University's
$2. 735 million cap~tal "Campaign for
Excellence" has surpassed its goal by
over $850,000, President Daniel H.
Perlman of Newton said last week.

gram, has reached a total of $3.6 Temple Street near the State House.
million or 31 percent '.above its goal.
rhe comprehens.ive Facilities
Perlman said the two-year "Cam,Pevelopement Progr"1111 at the 6,100 paign for Excellence," launched in
•'student institution includes the com- December of 1979, brought in 'more
plete rehabHitation ·of. Suffolk's new than 2,600 pledges from alumni aqd
. . The campaign' providing part of the 12-story building on Ashburton Place, friends including support from t~"
·financing of the University's $10 builtfo 1915, and partial renov~tion of corporate and philanthropic coin'-·
and Archer buildings oh munity.
milli'on facilities De~~lopem~rt Pro- the Donahue ·------- ____..;:
: -

'L

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"

..:_

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..:J;_

BOSTON. GLOBE

B0St0N. iMA.
1\91"'1 '.

BOSTOK GLOBE
BOSTON., MA.
~~

Ne'W'

England
Ne,vsc1ip

New

1982

England
~1.clip

;/

·Edue-ators 1·0;,i to (flu.ht ,,
l:!,·•
cuts in student lo'ans
'1

By WiUlam J. Donovan
Contributing Reporter
w ASHINGTON - Raymond
Anderson likes to use himself as
testimony to the benefits of government financial aid for college
education. "In . 1946 I dropped
out of high schooli hackf:d
around for awhile, joined the
11 fi i h d h 1
·gh
f
army· ina Y n s e
school and then went to Colum-·
bia University on the GI Bill."

I

'

.

8uffolli, BU qfficialshelp. ·
students. protest cuts in aid

.
'

The cheering turned to booing
when Sullivan said,that "after the ,
cuts, college !admlssi()IJ'-will be \
Studeµ,ts at Suffolk and_ Boston based on your al>iUty to pay.. and
..
~piX~Eli\ies ,s~i_pped cl.asses.. yest·e.r- ''.J)rivat·.e educatio.n.··. w.ill only .exist

By Maryellen K~nnedy·
. · Contributing Reporter




I

.

,



1

day W)oin n9<>Ill"'allies:cp~t~g~'1'~:.:,.c:·_ _

-.- ,

-•c- .

J

••· Ptesi<ieIIt Ronald Reagan s proCollins saicl that "the freezTtjg-]
. 'pqsed flfileral cuts in financtal aid temperatufes today don't match.to students. The local rallies, which ..the coldness and indifference of the
· also attracted coll~ge adminisy-a- administration rn Washington,
tioh 1eadets, were part of a nation~ D.C.," since "i"rer ~l,000 sttii;J.ents.
at student demonstration.
. . in Massachusetts won't be back ~Ii
. • N~rly 300 Suffolk stu.d~?ts. ~r- school next year .if these cuts go
.rying, signs and c~antiv,g, We did th:roJ.!gh'/1
. : .·
it for the ,money, to e:x:plain why , At-Boston,-Unive:rsity, 150 stu~
they cut classes, gathere<i bellind dents listened_ to BU Economics
the State House ~~ ';l'emple Mall for Pro(; David Topakian, Administraan hour-long tiIJancial .Aid tive Services Vice President David
Awareness Rally sponsored by Hollowell and Student Union Vice ,
their .student government a,ssoci-. President .'.John Galli and Harva:r4_ ]
ation. .·
, . ..
..
' UniversitY. Democrati~ Club PresiDar_ren J. Donovan •. ~tudent dent Jess A. Veloria during a Stu- i
~oyernment presiden~. told the dent Union-spoIJSored ral)y ,<>ri'.)
•~heet1ng _audience th3;t . we Suffolk Marsh Chapel Plaza.
~ •;.. ?
.§tlid~?ts (~.re), · · · \YPrkiiig ~tu-_
The 1:1peal,cers criticized the di~
5
rae~ts and we re not ~otng to. take rectipn. ~ke,n by the Reagan A<k ·
\. t~f'1.~~}ying down. ·,
'.c ' ••...
,minisµ'~ti<>n, to.,m,ake cuts in'. aJl,'
Y,; "We're not asking for,,a,bancl- hui;n~11 service ~8: whlle .tncr~.s~ •:,
1

I

: .- .• ,tl,lf~i;;;,;ey~\f~j,,~itt ~~t~a:;n;·:::i,~eir:µr(j '&J: . ,
r:tfi?l~~tl"!..9f!'f'~!l~tJ~l .;;5~~~~~d}~1,l~ t,t J~~~-0

'
··

·,!

tnstead of the GSL, President
Ronald Reagan hasi suggested
that graduate students borrow
under an auxiliary loan program at 14 percent interest,
rather than the federally guar"
anteed 9 percent.
·
Gollege officials argue
ag'ainst the alternative program
because the 14 percent_ interest
is not available to' students in all
states, the p~yment/on interest· ·
would be required while the st11:- · .
Today he is ~he chairman of .dent is still in school, and many,+··
the graduate school program at
banks simply wilr not be ·anx;.,
Columbia University and says ious·to lend'to students:
he owes it all to "equalizets."
i
the Boston · area'.,' severa1'
"The key was I had an equal- 'college administr!;!t.~rs say (he
izer," Anderson recalled at a r~ cut~ would cause pro'.blems. "tt·s,,
cent meetiiag of over 200 gradu- an insult to the program,,. 'says
ate and ·professional schooJ ad- Paul Combe, financial aid direcmintstrators. "That's what the tori at Boston <;::ollege, where
Guaranteed Student Loan pro- 1500 graduate students received
gram is to kids today. It's an $q.3 million through the GSL
equalizer."
pt<;>g~am last year. "It dould
Government financial assis- have a devastating iimpact on
tance has also been an equalizer graduate education."1
for national security adviser · ! t'These are ·very 1significant
William P; Clark and presiden- /cuts for us," ,$a'ys Suffolk· U,nj.:,,
tial· counselor Edwin M~ 3d, 'versity,_President. Daniel , Pearlboth of whom attended college 1. man, whose graduate $tudents
on .the GI Bill, and for deputy . · could lose over $7 million if the
press secretary _La.rry Speakes, / cuts are approved. "With the· ,,
who financed his education. high technology of today, more
through the Nationa ' efens~ and more a graduate degree is
Student Loan progr . the pre: necessary."
Darcie Lincoln, financial aid
decessor of tod~ay' National, ~Irect Student
n plan. Even director at Suffolk, added that
Vice Presiden George Bush, the school's evening program
.
who ,came f=o ari,affluent f~m- and the determination ·of the
Hy, took adv tage of the GI 1Bill students may help tq deflect the
while In co ge.
• · impact of the cuts. "This is a
. As ch~an of the Graduate group of students that's r~lly ·
and Professional firiantjal Aid , committed and tlieire·going.;to ,." .,\,,
CounciY, Anderson and his col- do what it takes to stay in."
leagues had gathered ,in opposi- · At Northeastern University
tion to the Reagan Administra- the cuts would '"decimate the
tion's proposal to eliminate - graduate program," according .
graduate and professional stu- to Barbara Burke, executive as- '
dents frpin the Guarant~ Stu- sistant to the president. Over{
dent Loan (GSL) program from
1400 students received $6.4 niil- 1f
'the fiscal 1983 btidgeti ;
lion during the 1980-81 aca- ·
The GSL program, a/ low-in- derriic year.

·
terest loan available to, all stu- · . R1¢hatd'Bliic~;·dirfl,t!torcatt,tte:'
dents regardi~ of faniily. ih- . graduate financial aid program'
come, will cost more than $3 bil- at Harvard µniversity an.d a.
lion this year.
member of tne council fighting
The main changes proposed Reagan's pr9posa~s. feels the·
by the· Reagan Administration cuts will rqe;:iri graduate $tuwould be to double the orie;ina~ dent,s inte:hf:'choose not to ~t-

In

' , Boston University students rally outsi~e Marsb Chapel to oppose :
'' proposed cuts in federal financial aid..
GLOBE PHOTO BY GEORGE RIZER

I

·Eduetitors -1.oi~n_.·. tiJ tl~_/_if
· ,
1
cuts in student lo·ans
•!~'

' , Boston University students rally outside MarsJ:). Chapel to oppose"
'· proposed cuts in federal financial aid._ \ GLOBE PHOTO BY GEORGE RiiER
I

.

\·.

'

;

\,Suffolli, BU Qfficials help ..
students. protest cuts in aid
By Maryellen K~nnedy ·
The cheering _turned to booing
contributing Reporter
when Sull\van said that "after the ..
- ·
.
'
. · . .. .·.· cuts, college _iadmis.siOI1· will be i
, • ,S,tudepts at Suffolk and.Boston based on your apUity to pay"_a.nd ,
~~~rsi\ies.,s~i_pped c ~ es_.t_er-_·;&.' v:;e_w_=·ion· wHl only:_·_e~st
rri-ff.
___ •.
_
day to join n90III"~llies-:p~~g"' 0
-_- .
·: ....,,:-__ . _
_,. -:~: . ,i
. Pre~19e~t _Ronald, Reagan s, proCollins said that "the 'freez1µ~
. pqsed f~eral cuts in financial aid temperatures today don't match:
to students. The local rallies, which .the coldness and indifference of the·
. also attraded col\ege admi11is.tra- administration Jn Washington, ,
tion l~ders, were part of a nation- D.C.," since ''over ~1.000 students ... ·
aJ student demonstration.
. . · in Massachusetts won't be back Jii
•: N~rly 300 Suffolk stud~?ts car- school next year 'if these cuts, go
rying,signs and c~antiQg, We did thro~h':'.i. ,-.. .
·•
it for. the ,money, to explain why
ACBoston·'University, 150 stuthey cut classes, gatherep bellind dents listened to BU Economics
the State House o.~ J'emple MaH for Pro(; David Topakil:ln, Administra~
an hour-long ti~anclal .Aid tive Services Vice President David
Awar~ness Rally sponsored by Hollowell and Student Union Vice .
their student government a,ssoci- President .'.Je>hri G~lii and HarvarQ
ation; •
•. . .
.
' Universitr Deniocrati<? Club Prei:;1~.
: Pa:r:ren J. Donovan, ~tudent dent Jess A'. Velona during a Stq-. i
~oye:r:nment presiden~, toldthe dent Union-spo~sored rally <>n: .
. cheefing audience th~t we Suffo~ Marsh Chapel Plaza.
_ c; {''
,~q~~?ts C~.re), · · · ~rkh?,g stu .
The speak,er~ criticized .the di~
1
f,~!lts ~nd we re not ~otng to ~ake rection taken PY the Reagan A<k
, fftese:~lltS ,lying down.
. ·.-·.
ministratf'oii to niake· cuts in. all'
not asking for, ~·~11anc1- . 'huptaQ'servi~ ~~.ei w:hqfincr~s-.\
Y_

1

<

1

)'._ ki'>:~\Ve'fe'

· · · ~1~i;;::1:~~~i~iJ1~1i{t ~lt~,t~r~·~i,,~ei;~~:cj ~eq"°1 _
;'ktjp;~itJaat we want, it.'' :- ·,. . ·"~~t- '=~ik~rt~:tlh~~ ·.
, .. ;:ii~'~e~ti!f~cf
Ti{e nation~ stw:l~nt fobby;..:
<

;<: ·

,-~;~~~f~r16va\:,,~,~e:"'~l1y. ;, daytnwashillgtoti;.bid.}~tft~11y:,~
·\v~~ ~W{olk: Univ~rsity Preslg~~t _ends today;)~llt_,~r~ter. ~9St<>,q s!e-, .

t>antel ~Perlman; l>ean of Students ' dents say they 11 'continue to prD':aradlef Sullivan, Fll)ancial Aid pt- test, the ·propc:,s¢,c~ts at _Ei:Harvard .

rector Qlµ'.~ey Lincoln, state Repre- rally next wee~ an~ through con-. .
gressionat phope:a_.:.thons, lett~r~
'
::nerJtt/ajid.' James :Brett, Thomas. writingcamp~igpsand lobbying~-.. ,
.Ff{iib:e_·'r~_.:,_:_·.~nd Paulw_.lii):e (a_l(Qor_- . forts_ at_ Su_ffolk,. North_eastern._
.
_· · · · r · A'ufts and Boston universities.
· cli~ter)J>) ·.:.

r:;~tative~ fJf1.mes G-ol~~~s JD"Am0

~ - .1. ~·-- -'~ ----· ~-'-------· ___}.___ '

.. -

-

-

-

. -~----. -

...... ·



By William J. Donovan
I:nstead of the GSL, President
Contributing Reporter
Ronald Reagan has~ suggested
that graduate students borrow
w ASHINGTON - Raymond
Anderson likes to use himself as · under an. auxiliary loan protestimony to the benefits of gov- gram at 14 percent interest,
ernment financial aid for college .rather than the federally guar'-'
education. "In -1946 I dropped
anteed 9 percent.
out of l}igh school; hack(':d
College officials argue
around for awhile, joined the against the alternative program
army, finally finished high. because the 14 percent interest :
school and then went to Colum- is not available to students in all
states; the pi;i.ymen~/on interest'
bia University on the GI Bill."
would be required while the stu,Today he is ~he chairman of .dent is still in school, and manyi · ·
the graduate school program at batiks simply wilJ: not be am:;,,
Columbia University and says
ious to lend' to students:
he owes it all to "equalizets."
. .In the Boston· area'., severaI,"The key was i had an equal- ;college administr~tqrs say (he
izer," Anderson recalled at a re" cut~ would cause :proJ)lems. "lt),.
cent meetiiag of over 200 gradu- ,an insult to the program," ·says·
ate and• professional sehoo.J ad- Paul Combe, financial aid direc~
ministrators. "That's what the tor at Boston College, where.
Guaranteed Student Loan pro- 1500 graduate students received
gram is to kids today. It's an $q.3 million through. the GSL.
1
pr9g~am last year. "It could
equalizer.."
Government financial assis- have a devastating •impact on
tance has also been an equalizer graduate education;''i
• for national security adviser · ( t'These are very 'significant
' . William P; Clark and presiden- {cuts for us," .~ys Suffolk' u~
tial counselor Edwin_ Meese_ 3d, 'v~rsityYresid¢rtt Daniel . Pearl~
both of whom attended college l man, whose gradµate ~fodents
on the GI Bill, and for deputy · could lose over $7 million if the
press secret:ary Larry Speakes, i cuts are approved. "With the· :s
who financed his education, hJgh technology of today, more
through the Nationa ' efens~ and more a graduate degree is
Student Loan progr . thee pre: necessary."
decessor of today' National. ~IDarcie Lirtcoln, financial a.id ~
rect Student Lo n plan. Even
Vice Presiden George Bush, director at Suffolk, added that
who came f=o an affluent fam- the school's even1ng program
ily, took adv ntage of the GI Bill and the determination of tl;ie
while in co e~
.1 , students may help tQ deflect the
·
,
,
impact of the cuts. ..\his is a
. As cha:)hnan of the Graduate group of students that's r~lly
_ and Projessional· Jrinantjal Aid . committed'and lliey'regoin~to
CounctJ:. Anderson and his col- do what it takes to stay in."
leagues had gathered .in opposiAt Northeastern University
tion to the Reagan Administra- the cuts would '"decimate the 1
tion's proposal to eliminate - graduate prognim,'! according
graduate and professional stu- to Barbara Burke, executive as- 1
dents from the Guaranteed Stu- sistant to the president. Over;'.· ·
dent Loan (GSL) progral'ri from
1400 students received $6.4 mil- ,f
'the fiscal 1983 budget." ; ·
lion during the 1980~81 aca-' • ·
The GSL program, a/ low-in- deniic year.

terest loan available to, an stuRi~har<lrBIJckrd\~tor:ofttte;
dents regard}~ of family ih- graduate financial aid program'
come, will cost more than $3 bil- at Harvard µriiversity and a
lion this year.
member of the council fighting·
The main changes proposed Reagan's prpposa,s, feels the. · by the· Reagan Administration cuts :vvill IIJC~ri graduate $tuwould pe tq d_ouble the origina- dent,s ~ght ;·choose not to ~ttionJ~ ctjarged on new loans t~m:l'.' Ha~y,1~.r~1 '.'.TJ:i,ose th.a.t , .
from·5 percent to 10 percent; ap- have.mpved:iout, her,e frpi:n Chi- ),
ply a "needs_" test .to_ students; cagQ. for .in,sfance.. wrn ffnd ·_.·'
from all income levels, and. to soi:qe \Vay tO:pay. Bµt (hose '}'ho ..}
eliminate graduate and profes- haven't made the move yet ipay p·
. siomd students from eligibility. .,.,ch~se not to." Harvard graduThe moves are projected to save ate students. receiv¢· $22 mr
the government an estimated lion this' year from the fedi
$762 million in fiscal 1983.
:g~vernment.

••

\:

-

80ST0K GLOBE

BOSTON. MA.,
Di YQ'if!'.

---

~--

-

1 1982

THE TORCH

~CliQ

MAR

New.
England:

N. Dartmouth, MA

S.E • Mass. Univ.

·,-,-;-:1·~i:--:-~--:-':-'--~-N,;,----- -

I·Students to ra-.1-~lY~
r

t~gainst ·aid· O·ufs
;~ By Maryellen R~~nedy

-.

,

, studentroti6fing action, .. and is "a
l! __·CQntrib'uti11g l_~eporter
, local rally for those who can't get to
1 . -- Hund;reqs o{ Ma~chusetts col- Washington, D.C-."
~- · lege students _wlll Jo!n rallies. in Bos•'Our prim,ary _purlj>ose is to
. ton ancl Washington, D.C., today _ ma~e ~pie aware of what could
parr:pf-a tjational st1,1deptpro-\ ~appen_;to them," ,Dufresne:.said,
·:~~£,, again~, Presi~ec9.t Rqn~!d Rea- · l?ttt weals~ :want to get some kind
{g~_n s·pro~ cutsin the 1983-84 of ·action and student lettfr writ',;:feder~l ~nanct~l~i~ pro~m, - -_ - \ ing. So, we:n·~ di~tributrrtg pack~
_ ,- Ba:rb,ar~. Richmond, Massachu-. ets1 whi<::h outli,[!_e the proposed aid
-, !Set~s -A_~n: of Student 'F-inancial cuts and include t.!;le names and adAid'AdmtnJstratots spt)keswoman dre,sses_ of the two senators from
-said ttiat m~i,'e than -150 student~ eac~ state." : · repr~'ntirig nfarly 50 MassachµDufresne said that '!delegations .•
\. ;-setts colleges and universities trav~· from Boston College, Harvard,
i ,elect by btis .~o Capitol Hill y~ter- N<?_rtheastern,- the University of
/c;\ay-, to J~!n.. an estimated ,10,000 W,';"ell, and_ Tufts" will be repre. ;J~!ll~ents, at t<><lay·s-natiorlal lob- sented at,the rally, ~hile "~daition:),l;>~t:ig-day. _ ... _ ,
al stu(ler)t~ stage a_ noon protest in
~;,>E:':.~dditiohal Bay State students front o( Suffolk Univ~ity's 4tw
, W:'i.11: ddve cl,O\vn in cars and meet School, where several deans a:nd
i-~~~:':~e!l;df:the_ Massachusett~. legislators will speak."
- _ ..
Ji;;ffi9.P,P;\\Ric:hmond, said._.-''T_hen __ 1 .s~~rs otthp filu:<>lh~-lr'cl•.·-'-- ,
·ft~?'ho~tt:tBivirlbe)'.Js'-ilou~-~fiomrc'~~vid~'k=·---·:
•~Speaker Thomas P. ff Neill, and David• Holfowell, administrative ·
~a,tClr~ Paul Tsongas aAd'Epw-a:ra:: services' vice.- ·pi;esident,. and Stus
.'~,l{en~edyto st()p.furthetcuts in deqt Union President Doug--Setm, ·
all of BU; and Jess A. Velona, Har·
,<,f.~eral financial atdj:irograrµs;" -.: ~n esqm,~tecl ~249 million in'fi~ vard University Democratic C:hib
1 _ n~ncial aid reportedly _
would be president.
_
1
,.,l~f in.Ma~clmsetts alone under
Velona said his organization is
?R~~an's propqsecl aid cuts, which, "leac;ling an effort at Harvard to mobilize stu~ent opposition to)he
[':ipclude: · , __ '. - _
f·, ; ;• A~ J>erce11t d~rease in Basic Reagan cu!s and ~s comlµcttng "a
:_
:¥u~ationaL Opportunity ~rant well-,orga,mzed, letter writing cami funds.
-: , _ .
;, · _ , paign_ to get himdreds of students
(. - •- Eliminatio? of the Suppl~~ to l~bby their represejltatives." !'JP~ptal Opporftinity-,Orant ProThe word from the,Ha:rvard ad[;gram; - - -._-_ ' -_
- inir,tistration to the students is''get
f' _ ·•~ Elimination of the .Guaran- outt~fre,and organize'"_, yelona
;. teed _
Stµdent Loan .program for , said. The university will be hurt
-gr~puate ·and professJonal stu 7 by these cuts, as· well, agd lt-iey've
d~-9,ts,. _- , __
,.
,.!
been very/ supportive. Bur we alt
~,Prime interest rates fofundet~ know. th~t. in the end. it's the stuu~~-u~te Guaranteed Student Loan dents w_ho will suffer/
· r~ipients.
( • • -._ · i
_
•A 30 percent decl'.ease in Wot~
Sfudy .funds. ·
.
I <- . Traw-Emus. -a :M;iddlesex ComJ.
, muntty College freshman whose
__ trtp_t9,'Washingtori: was~sU:bsidized
' ,by her schoors student govern!. rnenti said that, with the Reagan
1_c~t~._-' "I _coµ_ Id~-'\t__ everi ford a com:[_' mu~ity coll~e. so where can I go?"
-_ , At ~ostpnUniver,tty today.
hun,dt~s ~f Greater Boston coUege
~tudents, ~re exr,«ted, to partici-

:,!

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7 ,ooo

DEC 3 1982
,-

- __ p<==-

- -~

-

,State a1<f _ ·

,'cOuldbe
4.0.Dbled.i
0'

:

by Kevin R:O~Reilly

---A bill, which couh:LnDr~ than doubl~
the amoun~-0f state. f~ncial aid for ~a~s~c~usietts college,students; will
dte tf ~t ts nP.t approv~dby ,the House
:and s~gned by outg()ingGov~rnor
Edward J -1King_by Decemher31;
The ~ill(S.2099) could add $25
million in, aid, has been passed by the "
State Seriate~nd is now·before the
-House Wayr. and Means.Committee. ,
· _• Neil Buckley, Financial Aid Direc- tor at Suffolk University and member
of the'°Massachusetts ~sociation ·
of Sto_dent F,inan~Jal aid adnrinistrator~ JMJ\~FAA);: t~e gtou,p which.
>helped draft s:2099. ajlicl·t,haf-thi~bill
-more 0('. le_ss replaces tfie cigarette ·
_ tax,biH(S;l833). _, _ T!i~s billwquld havereq~ired an .
,a,~d1tr~nalfive cerits-taxon packs of
<:1garettes sold in:this si:ate. The:everi-ue gained would beU:sed to in.' crea!>e fipancial aid tt> students.
- ''There was_ some concern ibout
ra,ising_anqther,tax i_n t!l(~se times of
-Proposition' 2_11i , '' said Buckley. He
also stated that the tax posed problems for the c:igarettelobby and as
a result has been stuck in the Senate
I
cohtinued on pg. 3

State Scholarships_ (for~
$29 million). This would
minimums from $300 to
student ofpt1blic institu
raise maximums from $
per student at private ir
Also, $2 million will be
matching GJ,ant Progra
of $6 million.
Three new programs
be established include:
chusetts work-study p11
$5 miU~on 03 percent\
.:b-y-a-pubJWor.pr,fv.a~e ~
a Graduate Student Gr.
of$3 miHion (at least~be matched at 50% 1(
vate busi~ess and indll
low inc;ome assistance
of $-1 million to .help he
holds ;tttending sdio_ol
Aid Director _Buckle
is a better plan than th
tax, but it will not pas!
lobby for its passage.
Rosenburg express,
for approval of the "d,
needed" bill, but add,
aid has to compete wi1
lice, fire, road repairs
be sure of the outcom

a

N • Dartmoui;n,
..

·• 1

,-'!,.'<;'-, !(:.:

---

w.

.,~""'·"",-,---;-----:---------c--:------

" ·stud~nts to.•rallj

.MA

7 ,ooo

DEC 3 \982

'\~gainst aid Qufs ·
;;. ·13y Maryellen Rennedy ·
j. Contrlbutin~ :~epotter ·

· ~tudent IobByfng acticin," and is "a •
locar rally ot tho~ who.can't get to
Washington, D.0. .
l O<Oµf prim,ary "pt1rpose is to
ma~e. 1".>r"
~ple aware of what could
.
.
happenj to theQ:t/' ,Dufresne. said,
·"qt1t wealsp wallt tel get some, kind
of'actlon and student letter writin~. So, we'.lfbe dt~tributirig pac~
ets which ouUig_e the proposed aid
cuts and inc}ude the names and addre,sses .of the two senators from
each state."
Dufresne said that "de.legations_ ..
·
from Boston College, Harvard,
N~rtht!astern, the University of
Lowen, and Tufts" will be tepreserited at,therally, w:hile '.'adaitlon- .
al studetit§ stage a noo~ P,rotest: in
front of ,Suffolk Universij:y's ~w
School, ...where sevetal deans and
lt!gislators will speak."
_ ·
ti.

Hund!eds of Massachusetts cols
: . · lege students .will jo!n rallies in Bos··: .,.,t· a n_d .w aship gton; ·o.c., t od ay
·
on
{ , :,~~: partJ,f a _i;attonal st~de:p.t pro}
r : t~t,,agatri~~ Presi!'.'le1:1t R,on~ld Reaf ;<;g~ti's·pro~.ctitsJii th~:1983:84
[ ~ted~al finan¢!~l~ic1 progtjl:Ill. . · \
t ·. _ '•· .· E3arba,n1 RiGhlllond, ·Massachu-.
r '' setts, ASsil~ of Student 'Financial
1
\1
A_id Adm_-:inisJ_tators s_po_.k_eswoman,
.
[. ·sa,_id t~t m.oi:e than _150_stud~nts
. .· representirtg ·nearfy 50 Massachµi .setts colleg~ afid universities trav~
[ ·.. eled. by bus to Capitol Hill yester/c;I;iy to joill ''ari estimated ,J0,000
, i:;f~tu<1e11ts~ at today's/national lob((J;,ying;day.. · _· ,
;,~.'.;/:.''Additfona,} Bay State students
;''cw;lU'ddv-e down in car~· and meet·
~:.tJ;iKfrest'of:the Massachusetts.

I ..

· · · ··· "1;i;~~h.nt~ndJ;~J.!1;f·~~'m.!{}.~,.,. ·'"~~~i:~ €'-~.tb-~l:l!L.r~{ll~lude:-i.:.~"
~·ho~to"':cofiVirictf.lJS House Economics Prof. ~vid Topa'kian,
·"~peaker Tho~as P, O'N,eUl, apd Da.vid · Hollowell, a;drnfrHstrative
~~tors Paul Tsongas a,nd'Edwara : services vice .-~~ident,.. and ~tu~
)~iKennedyto stopfurU1etcuts in _dent Union President Doug Seim,
::-.{~etal financial atd_progr~rµs;"i . all of BU .. and Jess A,. Velona, Har·
· · .' 'An estimated $240 million in·fi- vard University Dem~tic <:;Iub
i n~ricial'. a'.icf }e~rtedly ·. would be president.
\ .
., .
'•-·_Jost in Massachusetts alone under . Velona said his organization is
;;i:R~gan's pr<>PQ$ed aid cuts, which "leading an effort at Harvarq to
L\,indude:
•. · ._ . . · · .
mobilize studeat opposition to the
?41 A40·petcent dectea~ ii1 Basic Reagan cuts" and ~s cori(lµc~ing "a
\' ~ducatf6na{Opportunfty '9rant well.,;orga,nized, letter writfilg ciim~
, fonds.
,
·
;- · · . . patgn_ to get h.1.mdreds of students
(:C e/Elimin~tton of the Suppl~- to l~bby theiqepr~ritatives." .. 0
·The word from the,Harvard.aq •
• ro.ental, Opporjhnity-·-Otant Pro1
r
Illi~istration to the students is. 'get
' ··· ' • Eliniination of the Giiaran- out there, and organize' !'. yelona
: teed ~t1.1dent, Loan' ,progra:ril for . said. "The university will be h1;1rt
gi;J{duate ·and· professional stu~ b;Y these cuts, l:l,S \Veil, a9d \hey ve
dents;
:
· "
been very_ supportive. But we all
: \ ''~'.Prlllleinterest' rates for.under- know. that, inf he e.n~! jt's the stii~
ugrcic;Iuate GuaJ:"anfeed Student Loan dents who will suffer.•
1
. ' • ' ·. . .
\
~~--~---Li¢efpi~nts..
,( '• A 30 percent decr:ease fo Worff
'. .Study funds. · .
, .
·.
; '\ -~, Tracy ~Emus. ·a_ ~idµIesex ComJ
. munity College fi:eshman whose
... ttip t~ Washington was'.'subsidized
\ by _h~ scboors studentr govemi _merit, said that, with the Reagan
~ts,· ''I coµ.ld_n'\t e_veri _affor_.d a com:
.
\' :mu~tty cQll~~. so wh~re can I go?"
··· ·.·.·At ijost<>n Univetjiity today.
hu11dt~s of.Greate_r Bostoxi college
students. are expected, to particiijate,in a protest rally sponsol'ed by
-. t,ti~St"1deilt Union on Marsh Chap'e\ ·Pl~Jrom noonm 1 p.m:
. Annmarie 'Dufresne, a BU
· ~bopl of Nursing'serii,or. arid' orga- A
;,:;,.,. .t~At~ep:li~.\s.ai<:fJ~~;Jjll,,LI'~lly I
_i~~(n solidarity wUb t~e 0.na.tip,al

!:/F

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,·. ' . . :_... '

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- - '------~~~-·TT

'

' -

by Kevin R.o~Rejll:y

--A i>m, whictu:riuld:rrore than cfoubl~
the amotin~~fstate_ f~nci~I aidfo~ . ,
~a,s~c~u~tts <::ollegestudents, will
dte tf _1t ts nP.t approv.:d:by t~e lfouse
:an4s1gneqby outgomgGov~mor
,
Edward _J ·1King by ,Deremb~r Jl.
· · The Qtll (S.2099) could add $25
, million in aid, has been passed by the '
State Seriate-an'd is now·before the
House Way_s and Means,Committee. ,
· .. Neil Buckley:,-Finiincial Aid Dfrec- .
. tor at Suffolk University and me111ber
ofthtfMassachuse.tts ~sociation' .
of Student Financial aid administrator~JMA~FAA)/the group Which
:helpeffdraft s.2099,<sjlid'{hafthisbill
. more or ,~s replaces .the cigarette
0

. tax,bill (S,18,33). . :

.

· : Ttj_is biHwpuld !'lave required an ·
\a~ditiorial five cents tax on packs of
cigarettes soldinthis state. The:evetiue gained would beused,to increase financial .aid t6 students.
. . •'Th.er~ was
concerri ibout
:raisinganqtherJax i_ll ~~se times of
· Proposition'2 11i," said Buckley. He
also stated that the taxp9sed problems for the cigarette lobby and as
a result has been st.uckinthe Senate I
YI
continued on pg. 3
\

some

State Schqlarships (
$29 million). This wi
minimums from $30
student of pttblic im
raise maximums fro
per student at priva
Also, $2 million will
matching Giant Pro
of $6 million.
Three new progn
be established inch:
chusetts work-stud:
$5 mill~on {~3 perce
. ;.b-y--ii-pubJi~or.p_tjv,a
a Graduate Studen1
of $3 m1llion (at lea
1
biniatdwd at 50
vate business and _i
low income assistal
of $1 million to ;tielJ
holds attending scf
Aid.Oirector .Bue
is a better plan thai
tax, but it will not i
lobpy for its passa1
Rosenburg expr_«
for approval of the
needed" bill, but a
aid has to compete
lice, fire, road rep~
be sure of the outc1

a

tJ~ to railY
ilaid·Cuts
>,

isetts cols
e8 in Bosq:~, today.
cl,tpf pro)
r1ald Rea{d~BS-.84

~'fu; ·c \

[llsSachu~hancial
swoman,
;.~tudents
lassachuti.es frav-'
IJ~;y~terd;:J0,000

olial lobstudents
trid Illeet

:fiusetts

· ~tudent foti6yt~g actidn, .: and is "a '
local rally for th9se who.can't get to
Washington, D.O."
) "01,lf primyary _pufJ,lOSe is to
malte ~pie· aware of what tould
~appen'! to theIJ)," ,,Dufresne,• said,
QUt ~e.alsp want to get some kind
of ;action and student letter· writin~. So, we'.}l~ di~tributirig pac~
ets whk:h ouUig_e the proposed aid
cuts and include tM names and add r ~ ,of the two senators from
eac~ state...
'
'
' Dufresne said that "delegations .
from Boston College, Harvard, '
N~rtheastern, the University of
~';"'ell, and Tufts" will be represented a~,the rally, while "adaitional studel)t~ stage a noon protest in
front ot,Suffolk Univ~tty's 41-w
School, where sevetal · deans and
legislators will speak."
·

"·'"'. . .,. . \ s
..., <>t th.. l
r~~~· 'Eton~f~tii~d~:J~~~~·,:~.~
~

~.U't and David Hollowell,, adIJ)iniStratfve
f·E:dwara services vice president,. and Stu:N;µts in .dent Union President Doug··Seim,
all of BU~ and Jess A. Velona, Har~
i~Q in ·fi- vard .. Umversity Dem()Cf'.atic Ghib
1
· .
rould be president. _
1& under . .. Velona said his organization is
s,'.wnlch . leading an effOl't at Harvacrd to
·
mobiUze stµdent opposition to the
.fh:Basic Reagan cu!s" and ~s con(iµc!ing "a
v.ifirant . well~rga,mzed, letter writing cam,, ···
paign_ to get hundreds of students
$µpp1J- to l~bby their i:epresep.tati\res...
mt ProThe word from the Harvard ad/!'.
•. :mii;iistratwn to the students is'. g~t
Giiaran- out ~.ere. and organize'", Yelona
i:~n'l for said. The university will be hurt
fai stu 7 by these cuts. as wel1. a9d \hey've
"
been very_ supportive. But we all
f1(lndet- know that, tn the end, it's the sttifut Loan dents who will imffer. ,;

~i;:": .

;,:-,

!
I

1i1 Wors

~x'Comic,iwhose
ib.sidized
'govern·Reagan
d.'acom\~-lgo?';
}oday,
(college
,:partici;pred by
h. Chapt.

"a BU·
!d'orga- .I
~J,Lr:i3,lly

1~it10:1a1

l

I

DEC 3 198'l
,,

aw==

.

1

·StateB[d ·
:,could be.
'

c:

~

.

~

.'

,, . ..

State Schoiarships_ (fora total of
. $29 million). This would raise award
ni.inim1:1ms from $300 to $500 per
student of pt1blic institutions and
raise maximums from ~00 to $1250
per student at private institutions.
Also, $2 million will be added to the
. matching G_tant Program foratotal
· of $6 million.
Three new programs which would
be established include: ,a Massachusetts work-study progta~of '
$5 milljon q3 perceilt-\viJ_l pe ~Jlt<;hed .
, I
;by-a·publi~ or p,r.iv,a~e ~ploye~),;:
a Graduate Student Grant Program
·-A bin, which,could.rmr~ than ddubl~
of $3 miHion (at least $1 million must
·theamount~htate f~nd;,Uajdfor · ·...
be 'rriatched at a 50% level by pri- .
ll1:a~s~c~usietts college.students; will
vate business and industry); and a
, dte tf ,1t ts npt approvedl>y the House
low income assistance progrllm
:and s~gneqby <>utgpfogGovemoi:
of $1 million to ~elp heads of houseEdward J .f King. by Derember 31.
holds attenaingscfiQOl. ,
· The ~ill (S.2099) cotild add $25
Aid Director j3uckley ff;els tl}.at this
· million i~ aid, ha~ been.passed by the ·
is a better plan than the cigarette
State Senate,'.and 1s now·before the
tax, but it will not pass unless students
-House Ways and Means Committee~
lol>py for its passitge.
· Neil Buckley, Financial Aid DirecRosenburg expr.essl:<l optimism
tor at Suffolk University and member
for approval of the "desperately
of the'"Mass.ichusetts association
needed" bill, but added, "Financial
of Stu_dent Finan<::ial aid administraaid has to compete with others (pot~r~JfrlA ~FAA);. the gtoup .which·
lice, fire. road repa~rs,etc.)--we can't
·helpea·draft S:2099, sj)id't,hatthisbill
pe sure ohhe outcome."
more 0~ le.ss replaces the cigarette .
, tax ~iH(S,J~3J).
· ·
,· ' :rr~.s bill wpuld have requi~ed an
,a~d1t1~mal five cents tru(on packs of
cigarettes soldinthis state. The :evenue gained would be used to in. crease firancial aid tb students.
''Thete V\laS some concern about
times of
rclii;ing}i.nQther,tax ip.
Proposttt()fi'211z, '' said Buckley. He
also stated tha~ the tax posed problems for the ~tgarettelobby and as
a result has been stuck in the Senate I
_continued on pg. 3

d011bledi

j,.

~~se

0\

J

--- DAILY ITEM
WAKEFIELD
WAKEFIELD, MA

AUG. 26, 1982
~~----- -----------

~fwo- New--P-rograms

tific-;te P;ogram (APC) ~ill be offered
for individuals seeking. graduate level
ma1'age~~nt education ,to ~o~pleµient
their MBA degree.
·
The program will pr~vide prof~sionals with an opportumty to .0 bta~n
BOSTON - Suffolk University's - advanced management educa~i~n m
School of Managenfflht will offer two. areas with which they are unfamiliar or
neW programs this fall - a Mas!er's to update thefr present._ base of
degree in Public Administra~i~n wit? a knowledge. It will aJso provi~e a fo~concentration in health admm1sttatio_n dation and better_ understanding ~f c~nand_ an Adv-anced Professional' Cer- . cepts and practic~ for those movmg_ intificate for MBA degree holders, Dr. to new areas of management or seeking
Richard L. McDowell, : dean . of the advancement in th_eir current funcE
Schoo.I of Management, announced to- tional or professional areas:
.
BOST,ON SUNDAY. GLOB.'
day.
. .
.
.
The APC program consists of_ five
BOSTON, Ml\
The Masters degree m Pubh_c A?· 3-credit hour MBA elective C01,U"Se5 and S. G06,339
ministration with a concentration ~n must be completed within five years
, health administration <MPA/Hl _is with an overall 'average of 3.0 or higher.
f{e'ft
designed to meet the_ pres~nt and ex- No transfer credits ar~ accepted.
~1lf&l1Uld
panding needs of managers m the are~s
Suffo~ University is a privat~,
Ne'WB-elip
of hospital administration, pu~hc coeducational in~titution, founded m
health, ' resE?arch, health 'planmng, 1906 and located on Boston's B~ac?n
_
medical education, insurance and Hill with an enrollment of 6200 m its health care with an emphasis on a_pracColl~ge
e~s,',
ticaI approach to health management $chool ofof Liber.µ~ ~J,"t-s and
Managementanij~~' · !
- ' ----= ' .... ·education.
. ( The program, ideal for perso?s seeking advancement or_ preparing for
The Boston Globe, in associTo register, send a letter of apcareers in public Qr pnvate health care
,ation with SuJfolk university, will plication with -your name,· school
organizations, will . integrate the
again offer a: three-credit journal- and home address, position and
disciplines ~f public managem~nt and
ism course for school newspaper grade leve} along with a-cllec!c for
halth administration to provide the
advisors, journalism instructors $80 (paya,ble to Suffolk University
skills necessary to deal with the
· .and other interested educators be- and dated Jan. 17 1983) to Barbara
challenges of the political, social a~d
ginning Jan. 17, 1983.
Dion, Journalism Institute ditececonomic environment, and the ,m:
"Institute on Journalistic Tech- tor, The Boston Globe, Boston
niques and Newspaper Advising" 02107.
creasing resPQnsibilities of -m~nagers
will be taught by Prof. Malcolmcf' the health field.
---'----Barach, chairperson, Journalism l
·- THe MPA/H curricuium consists of
Dept.. Suffolk· University, and ,
17 courses and can be cm;npleted within
members of The Globe editorial and
- twti years of full-time stu,dy. .
.
business staff. Classes will meet at
Suffolk University's Master mPu?hc
The Globe, Dorchester.
Administration program was est!1bhshThe Institute \\"ill provide practi. ed in - 197-4) and its ,
. -ulum corcal experience in basic journalistic
reipon~ t' the gu:,a, '
a!ld. stat
theory and technique with emphadards of tfie National
!mc1atio11 of.sis on news and feature writing,
i,Schools ·of Public Affairs and Adcopy editing and headline writing,
ministration.
investigative reporting, graphics
, The '. Advanced I Profe$sional Cerand design, news photography.
/
marketing and ethical and legal aspects of contemporary journalism.
_
The sched1:1Ie: Monday, Jan. 17,
5,8 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 22, 9 a.m.
- 1 p.m.; Saturday! Jan. 29, 9 a.m.J; p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 5. 9 a.m.-1
p.i:n.; Saturday, Feb, 12, 9 a.m.-1
p.m.; Monday, Feb. 28; 5-8 p.m.;
,,Monday, March 7, 5-8 p.m.; Mon.- Jlay, March 14, 5-8 p.m.; Monday,
~arch 21, 5-8 p.m.
· • Tuition is $80. Enrollment is
open to newspaper advisors, Journ~lism infjtructors and other inter'e~ted educators. Early registration
is: recommended as attendance is
Jiihtted to 30 on a first-come basis. -~fg~~tration_~7fl.cllit.1~is. Jan. IQ_ , ""

At S~ffolk Univ.

DEC

~f!~~~_:

in

51982

Globe

MTA TODAY
BOSTON, MA
AUG. 30, 1982

Computer -science
courses to begin

at -Suffc,lk U.

fUS.TRIDUNE
WALTHAM, MA.

D. 15,360

Sl.lf!£lk U~versity will offer two
JAN 8
post-baccalaureate certificate pro_grams in computE:lr science applications this fall. Studies may be
pursued,on a part-time or full-time -(
basis during fall, spring and summer
sessions.
The Physical and Computer
Science program integrates com~
puter science with chemistry, mathematics, and physics. The Life
Studies and Computer Science program blends biology with computer
science. The programs will qualify
students for en~ry-level positions as
software support technicians or
technical writers.
For more information: Barbara
Gralla, (617) 723-4700, ext; 138; or
Beatrice Snow, ext. 245.

New

EnglamJ.

•w.~ft

Douglas M. Anderson, center, of Watertown, senior
vice president, Arthur D. Little, Management Consultant Section, has been inducted into Delta Mu
Delta, an academic honor society for the School of
~-agement, SuffoJi:.Jioiversity, as an honorary

15

J

• ~ u
= '°
~ ra ~'
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4)

f;

C\J

$

~~u,

>5:N

~LI.I;::;
:E:::i! ...
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'l>



en 3:

CID
0:::

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4:

member. Shown with Anderson are Roger D.
Shawcross, left, assistant professor of finance and
Dr. Richard L. McDowell, dean of the School oj
ManageIIient.
.--,,,

~

T.-:(!/Jel.su_,
(J,/,dsU;,

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H._

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D.A. 's Brief .



Ill

by Suffolk County District Attorney
- Newman Fl;magan -

from the obligation of attending and testifying at a trial
The policeman is allowed to work his beat rather than to
spend a day (or several days) in court The public is
Plea bargaining a necessity •••
assured that the criminal will be punished for his crime We may not like the idea, but we must face the facts plea bargaining is necessary for the proper functioning of he will not be freed on an appeal It is for these reasons
that plea bargaining is the dominant way for resolving
our crimir;al justice system.
most criminal cases even in· rural areas where court
Plea bargaining is the rule rather than the exception al!
across the country. By conservative estimates, 90 per- dockets are not so crowded.
Bargaining for testimony ...
cent of all criminal convictions are obtained as a result of
The second situation is more complicated - the plea to
some plea agreement During the mid-sixties the
Presidential Task Force on Law Enforcement reported ?btain testimony. A prosecutor will agree to recommend
that 8 7. 2 percent of all Massachusetts convictions were a lower sentence in exchange for the testimony of that
negotiated pleas. Also, a Suffolk Law Review study defendant against a co-defendant. The reason for making
determined that nearly 80 percent of all MasMehusetts such an agreement is to ensure that the person most
murder convictions were obtained by plea bargains. re~ponsible for the crime be convicted and given the
Chief Justice Warren Burger, in a recent supreme Court highest penalty.
I support the use of plea bargaining in this type ot
case called plea bargaining "an essential component of
the administration 9f justice. Properly administered, it is situation. Often it is the only way to break a major case.
The Suffolk County District Attorney's Office has a
to be encouraged."
history of solving major cases by br:rgaining tor the
Two types of plea bargains •••
There are two distinct situations in which a prosecutor testimony of accomplices. Both Brinks robbery cases
wiH try to obtain a plea bargain. First and most common is were solved by the testimony of plea bargained wita plea to obtain an agreement on a sentence for a par- nesses - "Specs" O'Keefe and John "Red" Kelley.
Several murderers and organized crime figures were sent
ticular charge or charges.
The prosecutor will agree to recommend a particular away through the testimony of Joe "Barboza" Baron. On
sentence in exchange for a defendant's agreement to the national scene, the convictions of major figures in the
plead guilty. The judge has the option to impose the Watergate scandal were obtained only by the testimony
recommended sentence or a sentence either higher or of lesser figures who had negotiated a plea.
These situations are always diffo.,ult A prosecutor must
lower. The defendant gives up his right to a trial and the
possibility of being found npt guilty and, in exchange, use his best judgement to determine how to handle each
generally receives a sentence lower than he might have particular case.
Bargaining to get the •trigger-man' .•.
had he gone to trial. He does not, however, go "scot
Frequently, the prosecutor is faced with a case in
free"
Thousands of cases a year . • •
which several people were involved in a crime, one of
No prosecutor likes to bargain for a sentence with a whom was the ring leader The goal of a plea bargain is to
defendant but everyone involved in the system knows obtain an appropriate substantial penalty for the accomthat it is necessary
plices and the maximum penaity tor the ring leader
Thousands of defendants come before Suffolk County
In some cases, there is no choice - there is Just no
courts each year It would be physically impossible to other evidence sufficient to convict the defendant
conduct a trial in each one of these cases. We would without the testimony of his accomplice.
need dozens of more court rooms, hundreds more
Other cases are more complex. Each crime ·1s conjudges, prosecutors, and other personnel, and thousan- sidered on its own factual circumstances A def~mdant
ds of additional jurori. Chief Justice Burger predicted may well be "factually" guilty, that is, he or she 'did, in
that court costs would triple if the number of plea fact, commit the crime charged. But "legally" guilty is
bargains were reduced by just ten percent.
a more difficult proposition. The prosecutor must ponder
Benefits the pubUc...
his chances for success In going to trial. Are sufficient,
But it isn't just the number of cases that requires the realiable, and credible witnesses available? How
the
use of plea bargains. The public receives significant jury react to expected testimony? Can a strong enough
benefits, too The victims and witnesses are relieved i;;ase be mounted against the defendant?
' If the prosecutor unwisely decides to go to trial,
~without the accomplice's testimony, a kllier may well be
,found 'not guilty' and thereby literally 'get away with murder.'
Taking the necessary risks ..• , .
There ls always a risk, of course, in using testimony
from a witness who has bargained. A jury might not
believe the witness because of the agreement. But in
most cases, that risk must be taken in order ;to obtain
justice.
·
No one will argue that'the plea bargaining system is the·
ideal example of American justice. No one would deny,
though, that plea bargaining is indeed a major, if not
dominant aspect of the criminal justice system. legal
theory must give way to hard reality - and plea
bargaining is often the only way to carry on the battle
, against crime.

''TO PLEA OR NOT TO PLEA''

wil

CHELMSFORD, WESTFORD
TYNGSBORO NEWSWE.EKl.l
CHEIJMSFORD,. MAJ
w. 9,380

AUS 121982

REVERE JOURNAL.
REVERE, MA.

w. 8,742

J.'ljew

~~,:

JUN 301982

England

Newsclip

New
~ngiand
Newsclip

:k,t,••~184· ti

,Fr.ank A. Scblone/o,f:

!Chelmsford,· has b8'ri
el$Cted an alumni •representative on the Suffolk University Board ~f
Trustees, Johr, S. Howe,

chairman of the board,
announced.

FRANK A, SABLONE
"I arrdooking forward to serving
SuffQ!k Unh:ersity as an alumni
trustee,'' Sablone said following his
election. "In the 14 years I have
been associated with the University,
I have maintained a close interest in
Suffolk and in alumni relations and '
it is indeed .a privilege to be able to
join the board in a challenging era
.
for higher education."
Sablone, a native of Revere and
the son of Mrs. Pearl Sablone of 52
Bosson St., Revere and the late
Frank Sablone, is a 1964 graduate

ot~evere High School. 'He and his
wife, the former Julie Laughlin of
.Chelmsford, make their home at 22
Erlin.Rd:, Wesflands Section with
their three children, Michael,
~tephanie; ·and Christopher.

CHERYL A. OOLLINS

Lowe:11 Su o

-- /vl vr0 /Ci f L,

Cheryl A. wllins
cum laude grad

I

Boston Herald Amencan. Sunday. September 20. 1981

42

Suffolk U. party unveils
new management school
Suffolk University's new 12President Daniel H. Perlman
story building on Ashburton Place greeted guests who were given a
was shown to a group of Boston guided tour of the new building,
leaders yesterday.
located at the corner of Somerset
The building will house the uni- Street. A small alumni park on
veristy's School of Management, a Temple ,Walk adjoining the law
new library, a cafeteria, and many · school was also dedicated.
administrative and faculty offices.
A founder's day reception was
It was once the home of the
historic Boston City Club and was held in the evening. A time capbought from United Way of Mas- sule placed in the foyer contains
sachusetts for $605,000. Another Suffolk publications and articles
$1 million was spent on renova- pertinent to this area. It will be
opened 100 years.
tion.

in

Ms. Cheryl Ann Collins of 40
Payson St. graduated cum laude
recently from sygo1k University,
with a Bachelor of Science degree
in English. She is listed in the
Who's Who Among Students .in·
Americ.an · Unl~ersities 'and
Coll4:1ges and has been honored by
the Gold Key Society. . ·
Ms. Collins is a member of the
Literary Society, Irish CUitural
Society, Women's Program
·Center ( coordlnatqr and director), Unlversltf Re;.aecreditatlon
Task Fore~. Advisor to Health
Serv,.ces New Directions (peer
counseling network).
She will be attending Tufts Uni.verslty in the fall as a graduate
student in English, where she has
been· awarded a full-tuition
scholarship.
Ms. Collins ls the daughter of
Ann Collins.of the same.address
also a student of Suffolk
University and the founder and
president of the school's Older
Than Average Students Society. 1¥
She ls also the daµghter-of David ·1······
Colµn& of Charlestown. .
.

--------.~

~--

BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE

SEPTEMBER 20, 1981

43

Suffolk University unveils 12-story
It wasn't quite a dedication. but then.
the building wasn't quite finished yet.
Suffolk University's new building on
Ashburton place on Beacon Hill hadn't
been named, so officials couldn't call the
ribbon-cutting ceremony yesterday a
dedication. But the opening of the renovated 12-story structure went ahead
anyway.
About a hundred people turned out for
the event, also known as Founder's Day,
which commemorated the 75th anniversary of the founding of the school as an
evening law school by Gleason Archer in
1906. The festivities included the installation of a time capsule in the entrance to
the building.

According to Louis Connelly, a Suffolk
spokesman, the building originally
housed the Boston City Club, a men's
club. Much of the original woodwork has
been Incorporated into the new facility,
and some of the club's stained-glass windows now decorate the main lobby. In
sharp contrast. the new lobby ts mostly
.brick. with glass doors at the mtrance of
the new three-story library, which has
not been completed.

areas. A fourth level is yet to be completed.
Suffolk bought the building about a
year and a half ago from the United Way.
its previous tenant, for $605,000, and
spent more than $9 million in renova:
tions. Despite a five-week carpenters
strike, it was ready for students when
classes resumed Sept. 10. Finishing
touches were added shortly before yesterday's ceremony, Connelly said.
"If you had been here a week ago. you
wouldn't believe they could get it done
this fast," he added.
Yesterday's guests of honor, along
with the many faculty members and

ln addition to the library, the new
building will house the school of management. administration offices. graduate
and u,nder~raduate classrooms, faculty
offices. a cafeteria. staff offices and work

LAWRENCE EAGLE·
TRIBUNE

-'Q- ................. _

LAWIUCE. MA.
C. ....

u

·suffolk
dedication

OCT

a

New
Englancf
News~li,Q

1981

1

Suftolk University will name its recent !y
opened 12-story building at 8 Asilbmton pl<!,~for Boston businessman Frank Sawyer in duli·
cation ceiemonles Thursday. on tht 451 h anni·
wrsarv of receiving; its 11niversH:1, cliar!t.T
Sa~"VeL who s'tarted out as a 2:h·cri; :in·
how Boston cab drin:r. was llie lar~;esl :,,_rl/.'..k

c,lnlributor to Suffolk's Campaign (or E;.":t'r
Jenee rapl!al iund·raising ctri\-e
He founded the Bostoll Checker 1';P:i Cu in
1921 and aequirt'd the Avis Rtnl-a C br S::,sLelll
ill 1956. He is now cochairman of l he board ol
Avis. Inc .. an international car and truck rental

company.



The newly renovated building tf, be ,.kdicated

to Sawyer has been the home of the now defunct
Boston City Club and later became ! he headquarters of United Way oi Massachusetts l3ay.
Inc. It houses the University's School of Management. classrooms, a cafeteria. a computer center and the four-level Mildred F. Sawyer Library.
named for Sawyer's Wife.
The Charter Day ceremonies will start at
12:15 p.m .. with edticators and Boston and
state officials. Including Gov. Edward J. King.
attending.

George_ ·Gelineitu

His·memory
is honored
by- Suffolk U.
.

.

I

.

/

1
,.

_ S,uffolk University honored the memory of the late·
Judge John E. Fenton Sr. of Lawrence last weeken&
He was one Of seven
cited tor their contribution~ to the university develop,:nent, recogri(tiori"" · ·
coming at a,program during which Suffolk opened_
the doors to a nevic12- story building at 8 Ash~
burton Place on Beacon • ·
Hill. ·
The former university
president's son, Judg9
John E; Fenton Jr; of the
Massachusetts Land
Judg~ John Fenton Sr. Court, was presented with
·
a medalliori:in recognition.;
of the honor,,by President D1:1niel H. Perlman.
.

.

'

.<''

1

.. _ _

*

*

*

'

C

trustees w
Archer's w
presented,
his father.
Suffolk
optimistic i
tion to the
dence of F1
cutting.
"Onedir
other askir
Perlman ad
versity has
ture."

*

TUFTS CAMPUS WILL }IOST _the
National Committee_ to Study and
Resolve the Problems of Older
Americans Sunday, October 10, Its
chairman, Dr. Edwar_d L. Bernays, t
91, of Cambridge, announced an allday conference at the Medford cam- f
pus. The conference was organized on l
the observance of the 80th birthday of l
Dr. Frank Manning, president of the i
Massachusetts Association of Older <
Americans, leacler of the New .f
England activist aging movement. .
President Jean Mayer of Tufts
University donated the University's'
Medford campus facil;ties to the corn-mittee.
,
,.=·ose__ _ '"",.~i{sconf~rence _
.· .·.
oLt~e,
-~~tf,,\,
' _.,,,,.• .,,all'Am-·eQ~r aware orana aci
..
' constructively :·on;. the problems of
Americ~ns.over 65.
.
''This coriference,'' said Dr. Bernays, "shoud help dispel d~p-rooted
discriminati()n in public att~tudes and
actions against older Amencans that
limit their opportunitles and those of
our country. The public appears
unaware there are about 26 million
Americans over 65, more than the entire population of Canada, about ~~e
out of ten Americans. In 20 years, 1t 1s
estimated, 20 percent . of the U.S.
population will be. over 65; 8 out of 10
are in good heal~ an~ c~p~ble. of.
work. Yet there \S d1scnmmation
against them .. Greater use of the
eldercly should be made in business
and the professions. 1 Contrary to
general belief only 5 perc~nt of -~e
elderly in -,the U.S. ar~ senJle. One m
six elderly· in the U.S. lives 10 poverty,
_. due to this discrimination.''
-.Members of the honorary commit- tee include · an'long others, the
presideg~
eis University,
Btision mvers1 y, SuffolJt,. No~~

·or·-,~-

· ·

-- .. · ~itu ·•.........S: 1nnru~11 u

}LOBE

SEPTEMBER 20, 1981

43

)lk University unveils 12-story addition
a dedication, but then,
't quite finished yet.
,ity's new building on
:m Beacon Hill hadn't
ficials couldn't call the
~remony yesterday a
te opening of the ren;tructure went ahead
:cl people turned out for

)Wn as Founder's Day,
1ted the 75th anniverng of the school as an
I by Gleason Archer in
:s included the installamle in the entrance to

According to Louis Connelly, a Suffolk
spokesman, the building originally
housed the Boston City Club. a men's
club. Much of the original woodwork has
been incorporated into the new facility.
and some of the club's stained-glass windows now decorate the main lobby. In
sharp contrast, the new lobby is mostly
brick. with glass doors at the entrance of
the new three-story library, which has
not been completed.
In addition to the library. the new
building will house the school of management, administration offices, graduate
and undergraduate classrooms. faculty
offices, a cafeteria, staff offices and work

areas. A fourth level is yet to be completed.
Suffolk bought the building about a
year and a half ago from the United Way,
its previous tenant, for $605,000, and
spent more than $9 million in renova~
tions. Despite a five-week carpenters
strike. it was ready for students when
classes resumed Sept. 10. Finishing
touches were added shortly before yesterday's ceremony. Connelly said.
"If you had been here a week ago, you
wouldn't believe they could get It done
this fast," he added.
Yesterday's guests of honor, along
with the many faculty members and

trustees who turned out. were Gleason
Archer's widow and son. who was later
presented with a medallion in memory of
his father.
Suffolk president Daniel Perlman was
optimistic in his remarks about the addi- .
tion to the school. He noted the coinci- i
dence of Founder's Day and the ribbon
cutting.
"One directing our attention back, the
other asking us to look to the future,"
Perhpan added. ''I believe that this university has excellent prospects for the future."

------

. . . . . . . . -.. ____ *

~WRENCE EAGLE·

TRIBUNE

~*

lAWREBCE. MA.
D. QJllm

tfl._4-:fL

(u

\

Newsc.J.i,9

tion
will nam1' ii s recen! ly
g at 8 Ash bi 1rton pLwP
1 Frank Sawyer in ,.Julisday, on the 451!1 anni_rniversH1 charier

-J L,ut as a 2f-',-(

t:ri1-:1n-

, was tl1e lar1.;est ,,;;ngk

s Campaign /Or L\,:1+

1g drive
ou Checker

New
England!

OCT 2 1981

']\.i \i

Co in

/\vis Renl-a-(·;,r S\sLull
iairman of the board of

aal car ancl truck relltal
building to be dedicated
10me of the now defunct
later became thP ht:adof Massachusetts Gay.

stty's Schou! of Manageeteria, a cornpute1 cendred F. Sawyer Library.
,1emonies will start at
itors and Boston and
; Gov. Edward J. King,

George_ .Gelineau

His·memory
is honored
by Suffolk U.
'

I

,

,

1:....__.__ ._:

.-.6. .LL -

*

TUFTS CAMPUS WILL HOST the
National Committee to Study and
Resolve the Problems of Older.
Americans Sunday, October 10, Its
chairman, Dr. Edward L. Bernays, t
91 of Cambridge, announced an allday conference at the Medford 'Cam- f
pus The conference was organized on J
the observance of the 80th birthday of l
Dr. Frank Manning, ~r~ident of the f
Massachusetts AssOciabon of Older
Americans, lead~r of the New
England activist agmg movement.
President Jean Mayer of Tufts
University donated the University's'
Medford campus facil~ties to the com-·
mittee.
.
.'<.,;HP!:'P.:0 s.e· ofJ~.1 co.·nf,.rence.J~..i..·•·!<t::;.,.
. ..
-·~,all~Aineij~s aware ofaffiT acr
. constructively;."oh: the problems Qf.
Americans Qver 65.
_''This conference," said Dr. Bernays,''shoud h~lp dis~l d~p-rooted
discriminatiQn m pubhc attI_tudes and
actions against older Amencans that
limit their opportunities and those of ·
our country. The public apP;e~
unaware there are about 26 milhon
Americans over 65, more than the en~
tire population of Canada, about ~~e
out of ten Americans. In 20 years, It Is
estimated, 20 percent. of the U.S.
population will be over 65; 8 out of 10
are in good health an~ c~p~ble. of.
work. Yet there is discnmmation
against them. Greater ~ o~ the
eldeily should be made m busmess
and the professions.' Contrary to
general belief only 5 perc~nt of ~e
elderly in ,the u.S. ar~ sen~e. One m
six elderly in the U.S. hves mpoverty,

,

He was one of seven
cited for their contribution~ to the university development, recogri~ion ~·
coming at i:1sprogram duri119 which Suffolk opened
the doors to a new~12story building at 8 Ash~ .
b'urton Place on ~aeon_·
Hill. ·

_t,,.hn'··c

*

1

. Suffolk Uaii&rsity honored the memory of the late
Judge John E. Fenton $r. of Lawrence last weekend.

The former university
pre$idenfs.son, Judg,

*

..Inn ...

n,lc., nlc,t>1'imin~tinn ,,

- LAUREL LEDGARD

---1

-~£M~~

i•;J

1...... '\.t

c1-

i iund·raisin:;: drivr

eel the Bost~ii Chci'ker Tu<:l c·o. in
·quired the Avis Hent-a (';,r 5\Sle!ll
is now enchairm,\l\ of i ht board oj
1 international car and truck relltal
,; renovated building to be dedicated
.s been the home of the now detunct
Club and iater became the head-

Jnited Way ot Massachusetts !3av.
· the University's School of Manage)OffiS, a cafeteria, a computer cen,ur-le~el Mildred F. Sawyer Library.
twyer s \Vife.
ter Day ceremonies will start at
with educators and Boston and
;, Including Gov. Edward J King.

1s nonored

by Suffolk U.
\

1'

,

S.uffolk Univers1ty'hono ed th
.
·
Judge John E F .
"
e memory of the late
. enton Sr. of Lawrence last weekend.

. He was one Of seven
cited for their contribution~ to the university develop~ent, recognition-" , coming at a,program during Which Suffolk opened
the doors to a new~ 12- ·
story. building at a Ash~ ,
burton Place on Beacon '
Hill.
.
·
The former university
presidenrs son, Judgf
John E. Fenton Jr: of the
Judg~ John Fenton Sr. Massachusetts land ·
Court, was pr~nted with
of the honor_by -....,..__
a.medallion· in recognition_
• .
. n.....uwnt Daniel H. Perlman. .
·

--~T'!i'l:T~--:~·-:··~,:~°S~:_r" ~..,~~ v~

Ml.AU. ~\,,I,

' constiu¢tiv~ly :·on,·. the problems . of.
Aiperic::!ns over 65.
,
"This conference," said Dr. Bernays, "shoud help dispel deep-rooted
discrimination in public· attitudes and
actions against older Americans that
limit their opportunittes and those -of
our. country. The public appe~
unaware there are about 26 million
Americans over 65, more than the entire population of Canada, about one
out of ten Americans. In 20 years, it is
estimated, 20 percent . of the U.S.
population will be over 65; 8 out of 10
are in good health and capable of
work. Yet there is discrimination
against them .. Greater use of the
eldef'ly should be made in business
and the professions.: Contrary to
general belief only 5 percent of· the
elderly in the U.S. are senile. One in
six elderlY' in the U.S. lives in poverty,
due to.this discrimination."
. . .-Members of the honorary committee , include, among others, the
presidegffi gf 5XaQS!eis University,
BMion mvers y,
North~
eastern University,
niversity,
University of Massachusefts
(Chancellor Harbor Campus) and
director of Harvard University's Institute for learning in Retu-ement and
Center for Lifelong Learning. Also
Senator Edward M. Kennedy.
· .The conference free to the ~ublic, ·
opens at the Medford Campus of Tufts
University at 10 A.M. with lectures
and seminars on proble~ 0 of. the
elderly by outstanding experts. ftolll·
business, government, universities ·
and other institutions.
·
· ·
Among the conference speake~
are: Jerome Grossman, president of
the Council for a Livable World, Congressman Ed Markey, Congressman
Barney Frank, Represe11tative Jack·
Backman, Dr. James Callanap of
Brandeis University, Father ijobert
Drinan of Americans for Democratic
Action, Councilman Ray Finn of
Boston, Dr. Jeremy Rusk, Director of
the Harvard. University Institute for
Learning in Retirement and Centre
for Lifelong Learning, Dean Joseph
.Strain of §UUAI( ~ers1(y, Adrian
K"uffi·walter of Harv-a IOfiT Center
of. Urban Studies, Dr. , Frank·
Genovese of Babson, Maggie Latvin
of Blue Cross Blue Shield, Dr. Anne
Francis Cavanaugh, consultant
. Careers for Later Yeats, Dean Norman Rosenblatt of the. Northeastern
College of Criminal Justice.·
·
Food is offered from 12 M. to 1 P.M.
at the old-fashioned price of $2.50 per
meal. The confer.enee;;continues from
l P.M. to 5P.M. Supper for those who
do not attend the dinner will be served
from 5to 7P.M.

t®ff,

111.,,~., 1

,,,11,,1

A''*"' 9... :zr-lZ,'

WATERBURY REi!UBUCAH
WATERBURY, m:
~. 30,918

EP 29 \981

New

New

fEB 11,902

:&n1.(ta n J

Newecllg

Old friend hits town r
A long distance telephone call from
Arizona one morning reeenUy was a
most pleasant surprise.
A longtime friend from Boston who
has been transferred on business from
this area to Chicago, Atlanta and now
Phoenix, called us to say she would be
in town.
It was great to hear from Polly
Clark Ar.:her
Time has been kind to her spirits.
She bubbled with enthusiasm as she
told us of her projected Boston trip for
a special occasion to which she had
been invited.
It was for the ribbon cutting ceremonies of tbe opening of Suffolk
University's new 12-story buildirigif
eightAshburton Place, at the top of
Beacon Hill. The site is the old location of the Boston City Club, now remodeled and renovated at a cost of
over $9 million. The building will
house principally the Suffolk School of
Management, a new college library of
four stories, the Journalism, Sociology, History and Government Departments, and a cafeteria.
Polly was the.re as the widow of
Gleason Archer, founder. dean, and
first president of Suffolk University.
Polly and her stepson, Gleason
Archer, Jr., spoke briefly upon being
presented a medallion in Dean Archer's memory. Six other medallion
recipients were honored for their contributions and sevices to the university.
A dedication of an Alumni Park on
Temple Walk also took place.
All in all, a most memorable weekend in Boston.
We recall meeting Dean Archer ( we
always called him "Dean") and still
have some of the old hardbound books
1e authored wh ·ch be gave us some

~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

=

fEB171982

England
Nuf•cli1->

New
England
~F1!Clif>

. lllarvarq.·-10 raise ,
tuitifn; 2;other
\~ '(hree Private
' Schools Hike I
colleges to follow / -- ..

'rl.t,J:tlOil ;CoStS

BOSTON (AP) - Harvard University an<f
two smaller _Boston-area schools said Tues)
By The As~oc1ated Press
.
day that tu1t1on will go up this fall betweerJ, _An undergraduate a~ Harvard
13 and 15 percent.
·
, will face a $12,100 tuitiqn, room
KEN DALTON
~arvard, dting pressures on its scholar! and board bill n,~x_t year, an in, ,
4
, ~hip and loan programs and needed facult~ crease $1,560 over the current 1,
mcreases, said undergraduate tuition and acadermc ye~r. .
plosion in the world of today?
, room-and-board charges will. increase b~
Suffolk UmverSity and EmerVARIATION ON A THEME: An old
14.8 percent from $10,500 to $12,000.
1' son College, also in the Boston
The $1,560 overall hike was voted TuesJ ~rea_, also have announced tuifolk tune came to mind the otlwr day
day by the Corporation, which governs the t10nmcrease~. .
_ ._ , •
. . . the one that goes something like:
school's administration
Harvard, c1tmg pressurei'i' on
"Rings on her fingers, bells on her
Henry Rosovs~y, dea~ ?f the arts and sciJ its scholai:ship
19~11_ pro-.~
toes," pertaining to how "she shall - ences faculty, sa.1d, "Tmtton fees constitute grams a~d needed faculty
have music wherever she goos."
one of our, ~aJo_r sources of operating salary rncreas~s_,
said
We looked twice when we saw a
funds, and .1t 1s with great reluctance that• undergraduate tmt10i:i · _ and
yowig man playing a guitar while ridwe must raise them."
, room-and-board charges will ining a bicycle on Boylston Street in
Suffolk Universit.y_said it would increas~ crease by 14.8 percent, from
Boston this week.
undergra~u~te tuition $420, a 13 percent in-I $10,540 to $12,100.
.
A battery Wlit was strapped to his
crease brmgmg the yearly cost to $3 630 ; _The $1,560 overall mcrease
back for the guitar-playing energy,
Dani~l H. Perlman, Suffolk pr~sid~nt i was voted Tuesday by _the Corwhile his legs pumped the wheels for
also sa1~ the university's law school tuitio~I poratiop W:hich governs the
would ,rise $500 to $4,900. Tuition in the! school's administration.
mobile energy.
schools other graduate programs would in-;
HE~nry Rosovsky, dean of the
He really made heads tum.
· : arts and sciences faculty, said
crease between $480 and $630.
Much more common is seeing roller
perlman e1·ted general inflation and, fac-'' "Tmtio~ fees co.nstitute _on_e of
·
'
skaters on wide wheels racing along
uJty and staff expenses as the reason for the our ma1or sources._of operating:.
streets while singing along with what hikes.
_ , funds, and it is with great relucthey hear in stereo earphones clamped
. Emerson College said undergraduate tui-i tance that we must raise
to their heads.
_ tton at the communications school would in-i them.'' .
.
·
COINCIDENCE: Newspapers this crease $750, frol!-1 $4,900 to $5,650. Roomi
H~ said Harvard intends to
week were full of the colorful life of c$harges would mcrease from J2,l 70 to] continue ~o assu~e that_ any stusongwriter Harry warren who died at
2,450, and board plans would rise 13 per-· dent admitted will be able to at1
87 Tuesda in Los Angeles We read cent. .
·
tend, reg~rdless of financial
Y
··

President Allen Koenig of Emerson said' need. About 65 percent of the
about the rema~kable num~r of _hit bl~ed the hikes on inflation, faculty sal-J! 6,500 Harvard and Radcliffe
songs he wrote m .59 years, mcluding1 ary mcreases_ and cutbacks infederal aid. i undergraduates receive finanAcademy Award winners.
~
·
· · · ··- - .-. ·· ' cial aid.

K.G.D. Says

The Playbill at the Charles Playhouse when we were at the show
"Man of Crete" included an interview
with the composer who answered
Theatre Producer David Merrick's
comment, "I didn't know you wrote all
years ago.
those songs" with the words, ''Nobody
They are on the early history of
does."
radio broadcasting. Archer was a pioHarry Warren may not have been a
neer in the beginnings of radio, work-·
,ng with visionaries such as David household name like his contemporaries (Cole Porter, Irving Berlin or
SamOff.
Wonder what those pace-setters Jerome Kern), but his melodies will
would think of the communications ex- linger on.

1

o!

1

Suffolk University said it
would increase undergraduate
_tuition $420, a 13 percent increas~ bringing the yearly tuition cost to $3,630.

J?aniel H.1 Perlman, Suffolk
president, also said the university's law school tuition would
rise $500 to $4,900. Tuition in the
school's other graduate proincrease between

,vffDDLtS£]f NEWS ·
FRAMINGHAM, Ml.
D. 50 300

FEB 1 '11982

New
England

rr:o~~;;tao~

~~"l!ct,~1,.t:

Perlman cited general ihflaand faculty anl staff expense~ as the reasim for the inl creases.
ti, Emerson College said
I undergraduate , tuition at · the
.~ communications school, -would
1 increase. $750, from $4,900 to
gl $5,650. Room charges would in~i crease from $2,170 to $2,450, and
/ board· plans would rise 13_ per~j ce~t. .. _ .
1' tion

Harvard leads tJ
Associated Press

_ An undergraduate at Harvard

· will face a $12,100 tuition, room
, and board ~ill next year, an in. crease of $1,560 over the current
, academic year; _
. ··
, Suf~niversity and Einerison Col ege, also in the Boston

·~nf

1

IHarvard-io raise---: ; --~--. -. -- --- . ,
tuiti'1>n· 2; th
l Three Pi-1yate.
,. '
O er - :' Schools Hike 1
colleges to I ollow 1.
BOSTON (AP) - Harvard University and Tu,jtJOll .Costs
two smalle~ Boston-area schools said TuesJ
By The A.ssocrated Press.
i

Old friend hits town<
A long distance telephone call from '"'!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!II

<e .. •• • •
• .• ·.•

Arizona one morning recently was a :
most pleasant surprise.
A longtime friend from Boston who
K.G.D. Says
has been transferred on business from
day that tmtion will go up this fall betwee~ _An undergraduate at Harvard ·
this area to Chicago, Atlanta and now
13 and 15 percent.
i will face a $!2,100 tqition, room
Phoenix, called us to say she would be KEN DALTON
!farvard, citing pressures on its scholar'. and board bill n~x_t year, an in~ ,
4
in town.
~ ~hip ,and loan programs and needed faculty crease $1,560 over the current ,
It was great to hear from Polly
Increases, said undergraduate tuition anq acadein1c year.
Clark Ars.:her
plosion in the world of today·?
, room-and-board charges will. increase by,
Suffolk Universi~y and EmerTime has been kind to her spirits.
V ARIATION ON A THEME: An old
14.8 percent from $10,500 to $12,000.
son College, also m the Boston
She bubbled with enthusiasm as she
The $1,560 overall hike was voted Tues, ~rea_, also have announced tuitold us of her projected Boston trip for folk tune came to mind the other day
day by the Corporation, which governs the tion increase~. .
... . . . .
a special occasion to which she had . . . the one that goes something like:
school's administration
Harvard, c1tmg pressures on
been invited.
"Rings on her fingers, bells on her
Henry Rosovsky, dea~ of the arts and sciJ its scholarship 'anq }Qcin .pro- :A
It was for the ribbon cutting cere- toes," pertaining to how "she shall
ences faculty, said, "Tuition fees constitute grams a~d needed faculty
monies of the opening of Suffolk have music wherever she goes."
one of ouz: ~ajo_r sources of operating salary rncreas~s_, sai_d
llniversity's new 12-story b u i ~
We looked twice when we saw a
funds, and .it is with great reluctance that• undergraduate tmtlol) . and
eighfASbburton Place, at the top of yoWlg man playing a guitar while ridwe must raise them."
. room-and-board charges will inBeacon Hill. The site is the old loca- ing a bicycle on Boylston Street in
S11ffolk University_said it would increase/ crease by 14.8 percent. from
tion of the Boston City Club, now re- Boston this week,
undergra~u~te tuition $420, a 13 percent in-I $10,540 to $12,100.
.
modeled and renovated at a cost of
A battery unit was strapped to his
crease_brmgmg the yearly cost to $3,630. i The $1,560 overall mcrease
over $9 million. The building will back for the guitar-playing energy,
Dam~l H. Perlman, Suffoik president,! was ~oted Tuesday by the Corhouse principally the Suffolk School of while his legs pumped the wheels for
also said the university's law school tuition! ·. poration which . governs the
Management, a new college library of mobile energy.
would rise $500 to $4,900. Tuition in the! school's administration.
four stories, the Journalism, SocioloHe really made heads turn.
school's other graduate programs would in-1 HE~nry Rosovsky, dean of the
gy, History and Government Departcrease between $480 and $630.
: arts and sciences· faculty, said
Much more common is seeing roller
Perlman eited general inflation and fac-! "Tuition. fees constitute one of
ments. and a cafeteria.
Polly was there as the widow of sk.aters on wide wheels racing along uJty and staff expenses as the reason for thei ?ur major sources,of operating:
; funds, and it is with great relucGleason Archer, founder, dean, and streets while singing along with what hikes.
they hear in stereo earphones clamped
. Emerson College said undergraduate tui-: tance that we must raise
first president of Suffolk University.
hon at the communications school would in_; them."
Polly and her stepson, Gleason to their heads.
Archer, Jr., spoke briefly upon being
COINCIDENCE: Newspapers this crease $750, frof!l $4,900 to $5,650. Rooml
H~ said Harvard in~ends to
presented a medallion in Dean Arch- week were full of the colorful life of charges would mcrease from $2,170 toi contmue ~o assure that any stuer's memory. Six other medallion songwriter Harry warren who died at $2,450, and board plans would rise 13
dent admitted will be able to at-

o!

i

recipients were honored for their con- lrl Tuesda

tributions and sevices to the university.
A dedication of an Alumni Park on
Temple Walk also took place.
All in all, a most memorable weekend in Boston.
We recall meeting Dean Archer <we
always called him "Dean") and still
have some of the old hardbound books
ne authored wh ch be gave us some

years ago.
They are on the early history of
tadio broadcasting. Arcber was a pioneer in the beginnings of radio, work-·
,ng with visionaries such as David

Sarnoff.

Wonder what those pace-setters
would think of the communications ex-

in

per-:

cent. .
tend, reg~rdless of tinancial
Y

Pre~ident Allen Koenig of Emerson said , need. About 65 percent of the
about the rema:kable nwn~r of _hit bl~ed the hikes on inflation, faculty sal- 6,500 Harvard and Radcliffe
songs he wrote m _59 years, mcluding\ ary mcreases a~d cutbacks in federal aid. ~ undergraduates receive finanAcademy Award wmners.
'"'·
·
· ··· · ·· · ', cial aid.
The Playbill at the Charles PlaySuffolk University said it
house when we were at the show
W?~ld increase undergraduate
"Man of Crete" included an interview
,'iltDDLES£X -NEWS
_tmt10n $420, a 13 percent inwith the composer who answered
FRAMINGHAM, ·Kt
~reas~ bringing the yearly tuiTheatre Producer DaVid Merrick's
o. so 300
tion cost to $3,630.
.
}?aniel H. 1 Perlman, Suffolk
comment, "I didn't know you wrote all
president, also said the univer:.:-,ongs" with the words, "Nobody
Sity's law school tuition would
New
rise $500
the
f EB 1 r; l982 England school's to $4,900. Tuition inproHarry Warren may not have been a

other graduate
household name like his contempo~~s;;,~11,1,;;
increase between
raries ,Cole Porter, Irving Berlin or
Perlman cited genera!' ihflaJerome Kem), but his melodies will
-- r tion and faculty anl staff exlinger on.
pense~.as
8 creases. the reas~n for the in- ··
i
' Associated Press
ti, Em~rson College said
undergraduate, tuition at the
' An undergraduate at Harvard
·t
' will face a $12,100 tuition, room 1 communications school. -would
1 increase $750, from $4,900 to
; and board .bill next year, an in. crease of $1,560 over the current g1 $5,650. Room charges would in~! crease from $2,170 to $2,450, and
,academic year;
. ·
; S~~1lLlJniversity and Emer- rl board· plans would rise 13 perj cent.
1son Co ege, also in the Boston
area, ltlso have llDD()llDCeQ tui,- _ $l President· Allen Koenig of
· · Emerson sai<J blamed the increases on inflation, faculty
salary increases and cutbacks
in federal aid.
·
Los

Angeles We read

f \

f;:~~;'$'31~

Harvard lead·

ti

f

1

'

_,/

...
e.P 29 \981

.

..,

J), 30,918

New
"&n~hlllJ
NewecllD

fEB 11,902

Old friend hits town r
Phoenix, called us to say she would be
in town.
It was great to hear from Polly
Clark Ar.:her.
Time has been kind to her spirits.
She bubbled with enthusiasm as she
told us of her projected Boston trip for
a special occasion to which she had
been invited.
It was for the ribbon cutting ~remonies of the opening of Suffolk

University's new 12-story buildiiirit
eighTAsl'lburton Place, at the top of
Beacon Hill. The site is the old location of the Boston City CJub, now remodeled and renovated at a cost of
over $9 million. The building will
house principally the Suffolk School of
Management, a new college library of
four stories, the Journalism, Sociology, History and Government Departments, and a cafeteria.
Polly was there as the widow of
Gleason Archer, founder. dean, and
first president of SUfiolk University.
Polly and her stepson, Gleason
Archer, Jr,, spoke briefly upon being
presented a medallion in Dean Archer's memory_ Six other medallion
recipienls were honored for their con-

tributions and sevices to the university.
A dedication of an Alumni Park on

Temple Walk also took place.
All in all, a most memorable weekend in Boston.
We recall meeting Dean Archer <we
always called him "Dean") and still
have some of tile old hardbound books
he authored wh ch be gave us some
years ago.
They are on the early history of
radio broadcasting. Archer was a pio-

neer in the beginnings of radio, work-,
mg with visionaries such as DaVid
Sarnoff,

fEB 1 '11982

NeW
England
N,i:s.vfc•it,

-filarvarJ "to raise - , - · . ·
. -- ,
tuiti(i)n· j; othe
\ 'Otree ~.r1yate .

A Jong distance telephone call from !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!~

Arizona one morning recently was a
most pleasant surprise.
A longtime friend from Boston who
has been transferred on business from
this area to Chicago, Atlanta and now

New
England
~.w:,c.lip

coll~g:s to folfow

j. ~c~~ls llike '.
Tuition Costs

BOSTON (AP) - Harvard University a.nJ .
two smaller Boston-area schools said Tues!
By'The Associated Press
day that tuition will go up this fall betwee~ An undergra·duate at IIarvard ·•
13 and 15 per~~nt.
i will face a $12,100 tuition, room
KEN DALTON
C
!Jarvard, c1tmg pressures on its scholar, and board bill n.~xt year, an in, 1
• ~hip and loan. programs and needed facult~ crease of $1,560 over the current ,
mcreases, said undergraduate tuition and academic year.
plosion in the world of today'?
, room-and-board charges will increase b~ Suffolk University and Emer14.8 percent from $10,500 to $12,000.
• son College, also in the Boston
VARIATION ON A THf:ME: An old
The $1,560 overall hike was voted Tues, area, also have announced tuifolk tune came to mind the other day
day by the Corporation, which governs th~ tion increases.
..
. . . the one that goes something like:
school's administration.,
I
Harvard, citing press~res o'rl
"Rings on her fingers, bells on her
Henry Rosovsky, dean of the arts and scil its scholarship ·~nq. }Qc(n pro-;;
toes," pertaining to how "she shall -ences faculty, said, "Tuition fees constitute grams an.d needed faculty .
have music wherever she goes."
one of ou~ ~ajo_r sources of operating salary increases, sa'id
We looked twice when we saw a
funds, and .1t 1s with great reluctance that• undergraduate tuition' and
yowig man playing a guitar while ridwe must raise them."
, room-and-board charges.will ining a bicycle on Boylston Street in
Suffolk UniversitI_said it would increas~ crease by 14.8 percent. from
Boston this week.
undergra~u~te tuition $420, a 13 percent in-/ $10,540 to $12,100.
A battery unit was strapped to his
crease.brmgmg the yearly cost to $3,630. i The $1,560 overall increase
Dam~l H. P~rlman, Suffolk president,: was voted Tuesday by the Corback for the guitar-playing energy,
while his legs pumped the wheels for
also said the university's law school tuitioni poration "".hich governs the
mobiJe energy.
would, rise .$500 to. $4,900. Tuition in the! school's administration.
He really made heads tum,
school s other graduate programs would in-' HE~nry Rosovsky, dean of the
crease between $480 and $630.
• arts and sciences faculty, said
Mucti more common is seeing roller
Perlman cited general inflation and fac- ·"Tuition fees constitute one of
skaters on wide wheels racing along uJty and staff expenses as the reason for the: ?ur major ~o_urces..of operating.
streets while singing along with what hikes.
funds, and 1 1 with great reluct s
they hear in stereo earphones clamped
. Emerson College said undergraduate tui-; tance that we must raise
t.9 their heads.
hon at the communications school would in_! them/'
·
COINCIDENCE: Newspapers this crease $750, from $4,9~0 to $5,650. Roomi
He said Harvard intends to
week were full of the colorful life of charges would increase from $2,170 toi continue to assure tbatany stusongwrlter Harry Warren who died at $2,450, and board plans would rise 13 per- dent admitted will be able to atAn 1
w d cent.
tend, reg~rdless of financial
87 Tuesday in Los
ge eijl. e rea ·
President Allen Koenig of Emerson said need. About 65 percent of the
about hthe remtea~ka ble nwn~r lofdinhit bl~ed the hikes on inflation, faculty sal- 6,500 Harvard and Radcliffe
songs e wro m .59 years, me u gl ary mcreases and cutbacks fu federal "d
undergraduates receive finanAcademy Award winners.
....
. · · ·. - ai ..

K.G.D. Says

The Playbill at the Charles Play-

house when we were at the show
''Man of Crete" included an interview

,mDDLESEX NEWS -

with the composer who answered
Theatre Producer David Merrick's
comment, "I didn't know you wrote all
those songs" with the words, ''Nobody

FRAMINGHAM,
0. 5030()

does."

·u.

New
England

FEB 171982

Harry Warren may not have been a
household name like his contempo-

;,

.::,

~~~ls~fh;:

raries <Cole Porter, Irving Berlin or
Wonder what those pace-setters Jerome Kem), but his melodies Will
would think of the communications ex- linger on.

·:. .
:
1

-··

.

i .. .. .

.

Harvard leads tuition increases·
Associated Press

· An undergraduate at Harvard
' will face a $12,100 tuition, room
, and board .bill next year, an in. crease of $1,560 over the cummt
,academic year; .
, ·
, Suf~niversity and Erner:son Col ege, also in the Boston
:area,. also have. announced. tui·.
.
..
. ..
.-.
- ...,
~

'

-

tion increases.
Harvard, citing pressures on
its scholarship and loan programs aI_Id _
needed faculty
salary increases, said·
undergraduate tuition a.nd
room-and-board crutrges will increase by.· . 14 8 percent from,·
...
$10,540 to $12,100. . _
.

~--

---~

~,sutt

MEDFORD. DA\l'l M£WmD
MEDFORD, .WJ
o. 9,400

WES1£R!.Y, Rt.
r ,at16

tttAAUJ

NEW BRITAI~ ct

APR 131982

D, 34,500

.

. ~~A 1 "1 198?

.. . .

; ,.,··,,.

.merdease-OI $1,560 over
.

JStrabon.

~current

i

m

. . .

Henry.· Rosovsky, dean of the
~rts .. ~nd sciences faculty, said
T~itionJees constitute one of ow'.
ma30~ S?urces of operating funds .
it lS with great reluctancJ
at w~ must raise them."

r;d

Harvar~, citing pressures on its
schd.olarsh1p and loan programs
an .· needed faculty salary inc_reases, said undergradaate tuih?n ;and room-and-board charges ,
will mcreas.e by 14.Jtpercent from
$10~ to $12,100.
·
\

1
_ _ _a:;;;:::.;;:z._,;;;;O~/i);..· !:::6,=:~·_
.,.~\
-

.
'
:
·

_!_h~t mcrease University said ittuition
.· Suffolk undergraduate would

.


,-:---------- $3g63:1e13 yearly tuition cost to
I
ff
. fn2°, a percent increase bririg-

arvard t Wtic Daniel
•• · ·

lt::;.s-:1"beqj,r

H. Perlman

s
uni~:~

~

cc;:t

-.-

c-n
r-

ae

t~

1



I

ft



l:i':t

=

the Inflation rate to s ~on s~id blamed
ts offset bylast~ · but that gai/~abon, faculty

the increases on 1t
salary increases id
..
1.11.UQ·· cuts.
."ld cutbacks in federal aid
~
t u t i o ~ Hke Its Sister tnstl- ments _E___ ~.,.u&VU aimouncens, . aces tncreaslng coats.. Won • rnet'S?Il College said tu:'Jre cuts in both the federal year : : ~ charges for next
state $Cholarship and loan crease., w gq l,lP 14.6 percent inand the necessit'y to annoumed~ Suffolk University .
. ngtben Jae1,1lty salaries " ·b& to
a 13 percent tuition

;[;t~.
.,

. . ,.,

'.



'

e. -'.~·

.

.

.

;

.·'

',

.

.

•·.,



';:. , from throughout the state.are expected to rally tonight on
· the, Smifl!. ~oUege campus ~.'.9.P,POsition to pt'()posed
studentnnancialaidcuts.
· · ·· · . · · 1 .,
. Stt\lth student preside,nt pori.B~rnsteih said atleast:28
~- ·,, ¢olleges hnd uriiversities from throughout Massach~tts
~' aresen~gd~legates.~the "Ri~ftQE~µcation",rru.1¥: ·
' ''We're ~ol)mg to raise the ~~1ous~,9f polit1c1ans
in Wasbington about our:..concern over the tb!eatened.cuts
: to' financial aid programs,"·Ms. Bernstein said; "&i' .
~··. ~le present.will be voting ~n a .m~date asking.:that
present level_softundihgbem~~~ea, itn~tlncre~/'.
i:..:: :¥.s. Bernstei,n said~~udents have sent letters.to the~
·,;;" Ut:t1~e4 ~tates governors, senatorf and congressmen" and
-:;, ,. M~achusetts repres~ntatives and senators,askingibor
; l),ttts qf.ttJP.P9rtofJtancial ~d. :' :, ' ;
\' ;

,

.

.. from \New Yot1(®1'~rnor).:,ff.Ugh c~yttr,3ulia,eh1ldt
'p'

y;

she said.

~t

.

. .· · ·..

..

Mrs. ChUd, a 1934 Smith graduate, wrote/'tlle way to
h~ve'a strong America is to have,.strong, wen~u.cated·.
·.·

1-tcitnens:" ·
·
· ·· ·
~. ,. She continued: "Detrj.ocracy cannot survive'. under a .
'i: '.system, wh~r~ .the igreat majority ;of the pc>pulatiori is
.~~ under-'privil~ged o~ under-educated, arid ~~e~th!reis np
~i new blood emergmg from the.: gener~ public mto tbe
t leader group." · .
·
.. · , ...· · · ·. ·
~ . Seh~ls ..se,nding delegates incl~e the .·University of
Massachusetts~ Mount Holyoke,· our· Lady .of the ElmS,
Hampshire College~, Lowell Univ.ersity,~ Brandeis
i Uni;ver$ity, . Southeastern Massachll$etts '1niyersity, ·
·t Boston· University, the M*158achusetts · Institute of·
Technology, Harvardtlniversity, Clark University and
f;. Suffolk University,.' · . . ., , . ·· . · · ..
. AI's1P. sprlrtgtield, Greenfield, Bristol ,ana Middlesek \ · ,co~lllllnity colleg~; Bridgewater, Fitchburg; Saletp.,
:r. ,Westfield ~p Worcest~ state colleges; Amherst, BQs~n,
:. ; E~a11ttel; . Regis,,. Well~Iey, "'\Vheaton. and .Willi~
;-i.. c()U~ges.
.. .
·
,.
Mr. Bernstem...said out-ofstate students,are· alsO ex:·
- pected.. ..
..
.
.
0

neJlth the Increase, effect! and faculty and staff expenses as e
one
~ wlll rema the reason for the increases.
1egt'a In the
expensive c Emerson Colle e
.
id
rates do not
The nc graduate tuition
th~a1d unde~- 11
books.
money I
rt
tram and personal Ecations school would commuru- ih
increase
wbldl COUid put the 1$750, from $4.900 to $5,650. Room
over $lS~a year at Harva ~~rfes $would increase from $2,- (o
The
.
o . 2,450, and board plans id
to merease. which coi would rise 13 percent.
id
pares a 14.9 pereent rtse Is
~ · comes on the heels of a c Presid~nt Allen Koenig of Erner- st

J~

. .

J' \ . , .

1

da Harvard University yest, $SOO ~o $4,900. Tuition in the
In Y announced a 14.8 pera schools other graduate pro rams
n:"°' to $12,100. in the , would increase between
and
board
of tuition, room a $630.
··
·
.
,
uates. or tts 6500 undergr, Perlman cited general inflation

'

1
~.,.,,j :$~,tve.~~n-.all®t1150i~et$::,'bae~itoin:m.IJOhe.'

f

t1ie'
ty s law school .tuition would rise

~ident, also said

.

t.

. He said Harvard intends to contmu~ t9 assure that any student
achmtted will be able to attend,
i~gardless of financial need.
H out J5 percent. of the 6,500
a;var an.d Ra<:lchffe undergrad~ ua ~ rece1_ve fmancial aid in\ eluding off-campus employ~ent
and bank loans

,

.

?/ . NQR'FHAl\.W'I'ON; M~,. (UPU -:-:i'. AbOut 2;000 students

The $1,560 ovet~ll increase was ,
vot~d·T.u~~y ~Y the Corporat1·on
which. governs Uie school:S actm· _
"
·
.

aca emic year.
··
Suffolk University and Emerson
Clollege, also m the Boston area
a so have announced tuition in~
creases.

$tUaentS·to"l.

t:protest butfg~t cnts.... ·

By The
..An undergraduate at Harvard
will-face a $12 100 tuif
and 'board blll- :
· ' ·next ion, room
.. · .
year an
0

l\ifDV&cUt

,.Colleje
1

New

Planning on Harvard? -1
Pion on,$12,100 a ear
Assj)eialet! Press
'
,· y
'
0

r.tew
En~

:t

MEOFORll OAll'l M.~
MEOFORO, .M§
D, 9,400

APR l31982

l.CoUege-stUdeJlt~··tn~
·~,protest .budg~fe11ts ·
~

.

.

.

~

.

l: .'. ·. NORT,liAMPTOti,, MflSSr {UPI)·-:-,'- ~bout 2;000 'students

-. from:tbroughout the state.are expected to rallytoiligbt on
the, Smith_ Co~ege campus i(.9.QPOSition to, proposed
studentfmancialaidcuts.
· ,· ·.
·I .
.. Smjth student president Dori ~rosteih said atleast28
> : ¢on~ges bnd universities from throughoUt Massachusetts
;.,. are sen~g delegates to:the "Right to E4ucation'\rally.
" "We'r~ l!oping to rame the CO~~iO\lSll~~f politicians
in Washmgton about our, concern over the threatened cuts
'., to 'financial aid programs,'' 'Ms. Bernstein said; "Ali' '
:::. ~ple present will be voting ~n a _maiidat~ asknlg-that
[. .present 1eve1s·?Htm,dfug be main~etl, ftnotmcreased." ·.
'2 · . Ms. Bernstem said students have sent letters .to the ~
'.,/ Ulli!~ ~tates govefl\oi's, ~~llto~ and co~gress~en, and
;, , Massachusetts repres~ntatives and senators-asking,fbor
;r nJt~sqf,tqp.P9#0{H},i3»cialaj,d. , ·' ,, l '. •J: . ;
~,elf$ 3!~etvei.~~:te,n -A~\ltl 150 •_{$et$:'bae~ii'.nlilii eY.e~Ohe. ~
· from (New Yoi:J,(~l~rnor)~l\Ug\l CmleiiiFDalia:etnld;,'' '
~I

,<sh~'~id. . .

. ,. .

.

.



.

. '> ·•

. . .MrS'; ChUd, a 1934 ~mi~ graduate. wrote,·'~~ way to
0
~\,,...h~ve ·a strong America 1s to hav~.strong, well-educat,ed
/ .·' , . · · ' · · .. , ·
;:-·· citizens." · . ..
.
·i. ,.

.

Harvard ttrltion up to 'l!I , I 00
111!12
l3y R.S. IOndleberp
·
Globe Staff
H

Henry arts:,{'
·
ulty ofRoso k dean ofthe faca atat•-"'t releascisedences. said In
..........
by the H
news of'fkle.
ar·
of 'Tutuon fees constitute one
our major sources of
lng funda and tt 1.8 with ~ tt-

arvard University yesterY announced a 14 8
increase, to $12 100 . percent
nual cost of t itl . in the anboard for Its u on, room and
uates.
6500 undergradWlth the
luctance th t ·. , e-- re.
next fall Han
ncrease, effective thein," he a~~e must raise
1
one of the moat wlll remain
ard
. He said cuts In J_edera.I and
legt'.I In the
expensive col- state student asstst
·
rates do
The new CQSt Harvard $12 ance will
books. tram
money for year. or almost · million next
peneea. which and personal ex- undergraduate $200 for each
tat cost for a could put the to- tng to the tncr~lso contFlbutover $13•000· year at Harvard Rosovsky• 1s th, cost of needed
,
e , according to
The ..... --.. w h ich com- ,.1"etlovatlons of classrooms and
.laborat
pares to a 14.9 percent rise last I
ory space.
the heelaofa c:1e-/ mo::1:ingtofi College last
t
lnflatton rate to 8.9 f increase ~:ounced a 15 percent
~t~
but that gain' board to $12
room and
da

~

not=·
tn..........
==Oil
J::·

t;1;,1on,.
tu.;;.--r, like'i':'-..1nau'. me!:'ts~er ....~;,oun;,..
ns, aces fncreaslng coats. ttton • mel'89~ Col,lege said tusevere cuts in both the federal
and state scholarship and loan
progr~. and the necessity ··
strengthen .f;lcu!ty sa!a"ea~

and ~ charges for next
~ gq ~p 14.6 percent inwill

:'i...t93F'.3 p,rt=•
·

whtl!,t Suffolk University
tuition

..

.

.

'

..

'

~: , She continued: "Detnocracy cannot survive: under a
1· system where the ;gtetJ.t majority of the population is
~.~~ under-privil~ged o(under-educated, and \¥~~th~re is n~
Ii:; , new blood etnergmg from· the. gener~ •public. mto the
1: leader group." ·
. . ·. ·
·
. ·
i.'t Sch~ls. se,nding delegates incl~de _the Univet$ity of
~; . Massachusetts, Mount Holyoke, Our Lady of the Elms,
-t 'Hampshire College,. Lowell University, Brandeis
i Uni~ity, Southeastern Massach~tts .Univ:el'Slty,
·;; Boston University, the MjlSSachusetts Institute of
rt Technology, Haryan(University, Clatk Univ:ersity an.d ·
, · Suffolk University."
,
··
~ I . . . Aisbf spriigtieid, Greenfield, . Bristol· ;and .M,i.ddlesej{ \ community colleges; .Bridgewater,_ Fitchburi.' Saleip,
Westfield~? Worcest~r state colleges; Amherst, Bos~n,
... : Emm~uel~ · Itegisf Well~ley, ~eaton and Willianis
i colleges. · . . ,
. . ,.
·
.
Ms. Berostein,:said out-ofstate students .are· also ex~·
pected.. .
,

.

:r.

MAR2
/~

~-~

New

1982

,England;

/~/-,:.1 .Lvi1.:e.,r·,' ~·o·
,-.~.c-~·o~ e'// .n.'
. . n~ //~.JJ
AMYE

:c, W ,

. ·.

s,,,0,1

c'a· \.P·~i,,,:;t.'-'1
{ o·

t~cli~

r-~.

'

'i ,pend thei, fon• visi<iog congtes,m'" 'who
,..,.,-~~ssm••
' no,d convincing, no< tl\os< wbo already W
~\ pos< ,hecu<s

;\;~~~;;;;;;;-~o

mn,, c_,

,,,,.,S

h,d c,lkd a virtu•I mo,,.oriom on
,o
fund< weslty,n ,tUden<stl>< lobbY. ·
le< ;<uden<s psrticip,rte in s,id ,heicf,culty
New Yo<k, Suffolk ,nd Temple Univer

0

Gel Seiiou,
Others warned an students have ,let to
prove <h•Y ,an be thateffective voting b\oCk

·.
,
,rn ,id,= Y
> .. ASHINGTON :,SCHWARTZ s<ndcot, , '
·. . the . . p·
ousand

<m9900 ehanting ; , B 'P,tol yesteroay
· II'
- " ' fu
Bombs" .. s1eps ·
aft : . .• and ,1,),in of the uy .Books, Not
C
s
' stiek. to protest ;u: R?Mld Reagon doll on
- · in the Presid .' m f,Mncial aid p,o-

~ bu;,.;~
. The,'"""°,;_

''"" also ,,ch sen< dd<g;<ion> of "'"'' ti,a,
500
··We're going to win this i,_,<tle." Rep

bt Th•Y ,,ressed <h• need forn se,iou,. foct,and· '"" P•Y'" (D·"'"'· ). , spnnW of th•
'
~. figures """" in dca\ing Witl\ con· lobby. ,old , morning press confcrence, add·
\,. g,,,,,,..-an appm,ch ,chred by crncus ing. "We owea debt,;, ""''""""o R""'o,gani,e~ and ,<ud••"· rnany of whom wore he aod/his p,opos,ls ;t!< tbe t,esl o,gtmi"~

i

'The rally end dent
3. budget. , .
,rul denx!tJ'trating wh· ho s<udqt lobbying , ·k'nd 3'"'''" and ties 6, skirt>· ,nd heels on thci< we've"" h,d."
I ed lobbying rounds
A< th< ,ally. USSA chainnon J,nice fine
198
the lug"\ a day, • f - obi<,,ven; said · ,nd
, ;'
"Thi• project holds <h• ,,art of , new<YP' de,igna"d tomoimW N,donal c•ll Bell D•Y
. e
· ·
sm~e the late 1960s

g i of student activismh ad
.in
,'
0

0

of stu\J.ent activism," Mich~e\ Pruszak, Co,li·
resert<ativ< of<hdndeP''den< Student a rep-

Reading out the office phone Uell. she .u,ged
,,.ion secreW)' Tencl H. number of Edu-

,ounny _ , ii,, au . n from fill ove, the

': I•"

,ion of J<eW Y mk. ,old ,he g,oup

19&2
!,tu'
. O

"Som• people will plug us " i relicof th<
·60-W'"' no1.·· he said. ,dding, ··We're
here. to occuPY ,hei, minds I think if•

-

.,,hlobbyis< to ,,,..ge IO c,ll• from th•

, ·~"""'' Colle ,
.
oa <hon of
'(COICUS) andthegU ~nd Umv=ityStudenU
, ....i...... fUSSA) sptces of " C 1· .
soc,ation
' the tudentsAs-

., .

school way the DOE.'wi\lgetSO.OOOca\\s in
"That
on, dayc"nd th•<'• no< ,u,vly-sid• m"h.''

p

c~.:;';"

'
mted St t' of yest<roay
s
,
,v~~i~g,the cut
Mas·
agamst
s most
offices to I lobb'M. as- p,..doxica\ tl\al we'« doing the ,doc"ingl" ' fin< said speakers' at t.he rally, who inc\u.ded
Hitting the. Str.eets
Other
=fmgs from , m
,. rung
<ilks ,od
t ,he The •·new appm"'h•• seemed to p,; Qff in House speak" CfbomOS P. 0 ·Neill lr f lY
·
b
·
"" (D-N y
jaft«- , '"'' of <ens ion 1,e,ween lobbyis<sand \ob· "'"'.). Wcisss and Sen Alphonse o· Am•'°\.,;
10 spolre to
• .nu.< 3000 New tmd "'" ·. • who
' Yorlc ·
y
.
'
hY"' Policemen and sen"o~ wmched g•· (RIN .Y ) •,hre"ened "swift retribu<ion aHh•
fi Rep Ted W e m,nc,,I officials
patheNc .d ,
,
'
niall y in theeady momi'S ,s USSA mimbe<' poll• ,nd warned that "if we don·, "op

~

1

"' signiffc,o\ people., " lobby " "the
rally' lauded th fi
.students later at th
to Washington in res
movementto com,
eaganomics · ••
a cau

1
cu, room overll
,ease people'call R ponse _to the terrible d1·~slhd
t an 2500 New York
owing with more
whom"'"" th,i, h,ndsto indic,t th
ent,.._.lmostall of
"'on fi
In
h , . >Mocial ,id-Wei
' 'at they
· to contim,1e "fightin
ss urged the group
gro~ps ih America !hoon have not yet "ound
behalf oftheothe,
'
thelf voices or who

=

.
: fight bock.••
Gond s;gn,strong enough to
J
,
oot
., ,gan,,.e,sofn,tiona\
.
"'oMl Stiulen A . -ll~hvdy
"1ucli . effortl.'t so,Mn O.y--h,,e dubbed
said'.t.heir
fit, ,nd ,,.,on,I groups
0
.. moteStti,cessth

metwith

-··'~'"~"".c,i,,£~~~t~t~~~L~~--·

.. ('l~'..etyone said ' an they h~d hoped

f onned "human billboill<J;' • ,long ,h, main Re,gan he'll pick,u> up one by one ••
1001 1 11.
.
approaches ,O House and s,nal, office build·
R,m,~. we,dng "Wc
ing,. holding pbc" , which sP'lled •.'' F,.-p,n1 is"B\ 1s~Jll', . ·s "
d
· "'

.,
uunC1
·
_gt,
"SuppOrt high« e uca<ion" and "You n ,,
. '
.n ,o»•stSt\O &s '
d
. •
mom " us. we rern•m e• you

· ,, su,uutS>\l' &U!'
b
'\l
b
"
\
\"Bill l\n;t 6 ;t ' . .
.•
Soni< g,oupsehanted s\onns m •.tt.ract a?C\ ,\Ht<\' ~s"B:J ~t\'.\ 9 gU,·'
· t<\~J '""' ""' ,u.i \'
· ""U "'"\• •

.
,
n~"S •s111u0Ul
irted ,tu- "n<ion from office-b<>und congressmen.
&q
'
[gun yes· passing c,ffi paused'° honk and w.ve gree\U"'.l'" ,n,0011\"'lO(\Ul•00(\ \ ,,oor,. ' ou:i_.i
bd you
inneltY
id be in
'
,,.,id
'f ,dded
I
lk ·
r' ,w,se

1

i,nd hom•
I's<ud<°''
c,11, and

i

,.,...s,r·-

"'-""'°'VI"' '"' ' · .

O
By
,
ings tO a'" • prediction of<he turnou• h•d " . . \\OSI\•\". •'II u• d0\s,¥OU.. _.·,µ oH> o
-9\U\ so•\1,,--l •W uootj.L ,.
,iscn as high as 700(). ,s bu"' conlinued
,o!
s

'°sl'I

"°"'

0

.
. ,
.
i
,suoµU\>uoutttl"" OZ
pm\, q
,m&
\
1,y,n Umve<><IY ;en\ 6\)0 ,tuden~-l" '
S gsn"B:J~C\ '\l~p?"B 01\\\0"Bcl )1U"Bl
1 1
. \~re '" manY w,t stu ,n,go'""'':.nL -Ul.<td a.-.o"'\"B ,0\:inn g~ is. uiolJ ,0010•
o y--an .. ,, 11 0
\o
&1,"""' f.., uoµoro•V ou yeJ\oUl
y " an; ~uarte• o
h
.
f'
d b d
d,....,01">
a,rtve

w
..

~

1

t "~•o•

- ~ . ,. ,

"

,•

.,.

'

Many al ,.
ai ,h
mood smce~v ~nolCd . --.·-- R-I- .C,
.
c .. ange n
ht•t year "'whe
package pas · ' . n eagan
... .'Wh ~rea:. last y~
. sed with
.
:.: -~ut am
tut
to ha :""
mg ~uoom;, ch' fll!,gan in""'"'
views on the , ange,, mcrea~inglJ
su""' of R"l!ono
" mg this y,~
\ sponse to the Pre 1 m.uch Ill. o~ skeJ
"(,,.,.:;., n '
n page 4)
.

"*'"' """'"

\ a·

dt- 11 uu,u

"v,

.

,mu

"'"' """" •u..:.o,.,...,"'u
"wuu1u

stri:>n Ile ,several more congressm '"
I
.
yeste~y ,g,,,st f u,<he, cuts wh
ou1
Highe, ay before the House Sub: e "'.Olying
terd· Educauon, the New y kommllteeon
ay d
heds" rep<>rteJ tha\Re,g,n is "d' T,mes. yes.
in his /~ refusing to consid iggmg m his
props,\,• ono o';';,:•;u <hmtges
Co ngress ent on altemati ves suggested b
pport or

-t "'""

·01 pmpos,Js. "'• co'.,,:;:''
·

f..~\
V"'

cl

cause
._ ~ews Analys' :: Wh'

m"""'"

.r

°'

Reag·an , s stiate
Y
~~s. chat, witho!yh::~ be to s!ay quiet ir
his alive plan will surfac:port, no viable al
. plan through e· .·1
, and then to p ·I
c1fic pps1t10n, the T Ybecaus e o j' 1 of Sije
.· .
asi
us
. .
ack
O
imes article said.
i
_.:.:.._l.

\ ~rt-rtally
~- ~ <

(contin d rom page I)
~11~dent aid? Y&u'I et five people:· Miriam
Rosen,9erg, legislative director for-COiCUS,
sai.d after the rally
, On the lobbying side, people "made a lot
o'f good appointments,'' said Bhan Connelly,
· a Sllifolk University student who helped or,ganiZf!.the Massachusett) arni of the lobby.
. By midday, the entire Massachusetts and
Connecticut House delegations had indicated
they would unanimously oppose the cuts, and
21 freshmen Republican _Congressmen had
~igned a letter promising similar ,opposition
l'\lllUmber of Congressmen who voted last
ye'ar for financial aid cuts in Rtjagan's 1982
budget also voiced strong support for the student movement-including Rep Sylvia 0
Conti (R-Mass ), who, with other Massachusetts congressmen, addressed Massachusetts students from the floor of the
House of Representatives yesterday afternoon.

Playing PQli,tics
"Everybody says they're for you, an_d you
don't know whom to believe," Conne.lly
said: ''Politically, a lot of people would be in
a dgpgerous position now if they've said
they '·d support us and they didn't," he added
Several speakers during the d~y likewise
cautioned against cynicism, and exorted students to follow through the efforts begun yesterday by writing letters, registering students
to vote, and peppering theit school and home
congressional offices with phone calls and
\.,visits

Many congressme~ also urged li~tenefs to
spend thei1 time visiting congressmen 'who
need convinc.•ing, not those who-already oppose the cuts

Get Serious
Others warnel that students have yet to
prove they can be an effective voting block
They stressed the need for a serious, fact,andfigures strategy in dealing with congress'men-an approach echoed'by COICUS
organizers and students, rnany of whom wore
jackets and ties or skirts,· and heels on their
lobbying rounds
''This project holds the start of a new type
of stu(lent activism," Mich<_1el Pruszak.a representative of the Independent Student Coalition of New York, told the group.
"Some people will plug us as a relic of the
'60s-we are not," he said, adding, "We're
here to occupy their minds I think it's
paradoxical that we're doing the educating:",

Hitting th~ Sti:.eets
The "new approach" seemed to pay Qff in
a lack of tension between lopbyists aµd lobbyees Policemen and senators watched genially in the early morning as USSA members
fprmed "human billboards" along the main
approaches House and Senate office buildings, holding placards which spelled out
"Support higher education" and "You remember us, we 'II remember you ·'
Some groups chanted slogans to attract attention from gffice-bound congressmen, as
passing cars paused to honk and wave greetings
·By 10 am , prediction of the turnout had
risen as high as 7000, as buses continued to
arrive.
Wesleyan University sent 600 students, f110re than a quarter of its student body-and
\.ubsidized riiany with studeT1t government

to

NE

--

Many a,
mood since
. package

·'Wtierea:.~
tul mand1tte
ii1g economj
views on th
leading this j
\ sponse to fhe

""

(c,

funds' Wesleyan students said their_faculty
had called a virtual moratorium on classes to
let students participate in the lobby.
New York, Suffolk and Temple Universities also each sent ddegations of n;iore than
500
''We're going to win this b.llttle," Rep
Peter Peyser (D-Mass.), a sponsor of the
lobby, told a ,morning press conference, adding, ''We owe a debt gratitude to Reaganhe and.,his proposals ~e the best organizers
we've ever had."
At the rally, USSA chairman Janice Fine
designated tomorrow National Call Bell Day.
Reading out the office phone number of Education Secretary Terrel H. Bell, she .1,1rged '·"' '-'0 -'ccc= each lobbyist to arrange IO calls from the ~
school
''That way the DOE'will get 50,000calls in
one dayc-and that's not supply-side math,"
Fine said.
. Other speakers 'at the rally, who included
House Speaker <Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. (D
Mass ), Weiss; and Sen. Alphonse D' Amato\:
(RtN. Y ), threatened "swift retribution at the
polls and warned that "if we don't stop
Reagan he' !_I picl<Jus up one by one "
-Ralliers, wearing "We Are the Future"
buttons, responded by chanting, "Reagan,
· Reagan He's No Good, Send Him Back to
Hollywood," and waving signs that read
"Bonzo Went to College, Why Can't I?"

of

0

Both Sides
Many participants noticed the difference in
style between USS A-which ran the rally.
the human billboards and other visible prot.ests-and COICUS, which concentrated on
getting lobbyists inside Congressional of1
fices
Their cooperation provided "the best of
bo'th worlds," Rosenberg said after tl\e rally,
.explaining, "People might have called us a
radical demonstration, when we really need
to convince the conservatives But the lobbying proved us informed."
A classmate reinforced her words when he
described his meeting with a conservative
senator in a room overlooking the rally,:
"I was talking along, not expecting to
budge him an inch, and he was watching the
rally out the window Out of the blue he said,
'You know, maybe we should stop funding
tanks that are too ~eavy to go over bridges.' I
would never- have dared to bring up the defense budget at all "

.I

·e•wc,

t
f

'2

tngressmen c"=
~ueout
luts While testifying
Subcommittee on
N_ York Times yesir11s" c1· · in his
.
tggmg
sider any cha nges
? offer support or
.
~es suggested b
Y

l

j

Reag· ,
, ,, h
an s sirategy ma
teopcs_ that, Without hiss~ be to s!;iy quiet ir
rnative plan Will . . PPort, no viable l
~u~ plan through eas:t~al:e, and lht!n to pu:/
~1c oppsition, lht! ry ecause ofli.lck of spe
1
- - -........:.:.;,~~~
m~es~art1cJe said
l

--:::'.:.._.l

RIMSON

~

MA.

~stat--.
.
J"

:Ne'I -- - - -

1982

Engl-, •

-

~

-

----~-.........,=---

~(, Af~Jl t·l.T

je-ori·-

·

ID'.' E., SCHWA

c

(~'c'\ki to The Crirns
,:llON--Five tho
·Wteps of the C
hltntirtg ''Bt1y
~!1*ing a Rona!
·otest ·cuts in fi
~~~ident' s 198
:1~ed a day of
rttti~gwhichs
iii'gest surge

J'i960s.
~f--·!_--: --~;:

}

.

D. 15.00Q

,µ-

New

~!/

~;·::t~~

7J..C., Lob by

.

iiiis, '·bused i

::.<:).-

HARVARD CRJMsor,
CAMBRIDGE, MA.

.·•

~F the ausptc

1Collegean
iQittheUni

(

Admi1
Whichm,
~eceived 1
ac~ording
WitH tlie a1
charitiesThe s:Ua
khauser JUI
·
T

JSSA), s

oq\symp
fW.eiss
(~ew YmUar th
, , . fi'
·.
ermop
fd.,~he !Iding on T
ane install t·
reas0rer S
tcan,t ·pe~er the Iast rowbridge St • ~•on Projfct at an IfnT> ftom $JS 4 ,
....
,
th
~IRE ·
;.ton
· · ree Years.
Paid E tntin ~ Robert S ·1' ,
, . in .'
·
, ·
I Ve
e\'call R
,
more Year 1980
'
an1
ICUS re
,. ')
te A spokesm
:New
relay that in
;edth,
t' I
suited from ex
"
'
a.11cia!
Onecasefj
'

. . reStJg f • . '
In . a 101}"')
"fSti"ll Pend.
·
.

1.e
Am
.
:es ,o,;

~-.

>

.
S
-. · ..Cales

lnp
l',

~.J..
,!

,

. ···- e_was "d

·

roms
uture serv·
ices l
, A lead
·
A1·k
er oft
.'vll e Turk
, mg, " and ~ Calle
,tilnSfance from

Good Signs
.
evastc1ted" b
.
it~rs of national and regional groups
y h~s Ph-a- been bette SSerte
reffo~ SO far-collectively dubbed
\J}v:i!dlZeO ,,,_ · r S[!entl
·'Sfudeht Action Day-have met with

6tf success than they had hoped
!?Hf«t~~1,:9;.~~1 2P.!?..~~r,._.
3:t'

May Block
!

Aid Cuts
By AMY E •. SCHWA!tTZ
Two days of lobbring c•I'' ;·_:iJl;,;ng in the
capital have left organizers optimistic about
their efforts to block President Reagan\ pmposed_fir~~.9&Laid....:utK"b11Tineyareunsure
how many congress111en the national lobby
day actually swayed.
Over the two-day lobby effort the initial
cynicism of many sympathetic c~ngr~ssmen
'.~med lo guarded admission that the effoq
may have changed a few minds'" said Bal"
bara Tornow, Brandeis University's financial
aid d1rectQr, who helped wordinate t,he Massactiu~eus arm oft.he lobby,

News Analysis

~

Ma;;-;-lso rioted a! change in Congre&s ·~
mood since last year, when Reagan's budget
package passed without amendment
"'Whe!rea:; last yelifmosf~ffiqiats·fefta power- ~
tul mandate _10 back Rqagan in making s,weeprng economic change,, increa~ingly divided
views on the succes~ of Reaganomics are
leading this year to much more skeptical resp.onse to the Presidrl: proposals.

~

(continu-Tnp~ge~),., / ~

News. Analysis
.,,,,,,,.,..,
(cont· from page 1)
ed
··Last year}" voted like a bunch of trained
seals," Rep ·
Schroeder (D-Col ) told a
group of lobbyists "and we really did people
in.''
Still, both organii;ers a.nd congressional
frie~ds of th¢ student effort cautioned repeatedly against overconfidence. Of the
otherwise "solid" Massachusetts dele_gation,
Reps. Margaret Heckler and Sylvio 0.
Conti-the only two Republicans in the
group-spoke enthusiastically this week in
support of eJucational opportunity, declaring
their opposition to any further cuts.
"Jumping on the political bandwagon"
I
was a charged leveled not only at Conti and
Heckler but a( rail y speakers and at 21 Re pub. lican congressmen who signed a letter supporting financial aid
In i;neetings lasting most of Monday, sup-

porter:
speak1
spons,
urged
your
again!
week1
cungr
stanti:
Bri
dent,
the 01
met v
for pl
Depa
my b,
take,
Mi
man)
whor
supp,
print
The)
evef'
rgetl
Tl
,hoi
to ec
insti
den
cam

v,.
stro
yest
Hig
terd
hee
in 11
eve
COi
~

hor

ten
his
cifi

-

HARVARD CRJMsor,
CAMBRIDGE, MA.
D. 15.00Q

New

t c
~:Lobby
1982

/1

:,1

Eni{land

J'!f:.; ...i;P:

llay Block
4id Cuts·
By AMY E. SCHWARl'Z
fwo days of Jobbri11g o'I'' ,-_:dl;,ing in the
11 tal have left organizers optimistic about
1r efforts to block President Reagan\ pme~ financial__;ud. i.:UIS:"fii.lTihey areunsure
v many congressrrien the national lobby
actually swayed.
>ver the two-day lobby effort, the initial
icism of many sympathetic congr~ssmen
ied to guarded admission that the effort
ay have changed a few minds,'' said Bati
1 Tornow, Brandeis University's financial
JirectQr, who helped coordinate t,he Masu~etts arm of the lobby.

News Analysis
:~~so noted- a1ch;;-;-in Congress·~
i since last year, when Reagan's budget·
age passed without amendment.
rea:, last y~mosf~fficiats refta f'll:)!Nef,
andate _10 back R~agan in m~kin~ s.weepcunom,c change~, increa~ingly divided
; on the succes~ of Reaganomics are
1g this year to much niore skeptical re-

' ,o

"7,:;!T;:st ,'::<

NewS Analysis
··•""''''·
(cont· from page I)
ed
··Last yea, y., voted like a bunch of II ained
seals," Rep ·
Schroeder (D-Col ) told a
group of lobbyists "and we really did people
in''
Still, both 'organizers and congressional
friends of th~ student effort cautioned repeatedly against overconfidence. Of the
otherwise "solid" Massac~usetts delegation,
Reps. Margaret Heckler and Sylvio O
Conti-the only two Republicans in the
group-spoke enthusiastically this week in
s~pport of eJµcational opportunity, declaring
their oppositilm to any further cuts.
"Jumping on the political bandwagon"
I
wa~ a charge(/ leveled not only at Conti and
Heckler but anally speakers and at 21 Repub• lican congressmen who signed a letter supporting financial aid
In i:neetings lasting most of Monday, sup-

porters of the lobby-including House
speaker Thomas P O'Neill Jr (D-Mass), and
sponsor Rep Peter M. Peyser (D-Mass.)-urged students not to "waste time talking to
your friends-talk to the people who !lfe
against you " But few scudents felt after the
weekend that, in face-to-face arguments with
congressmen or other otticials, they had substantially affected views <,>n the budget.
Brian Connelly, a Suffolk University student and lobby organizer, said yesterday that
the only "brick wall" he and his co-workers
met was Thomas Milady, assistant secretary
for postsecondary education in the Education
Department, who "basically said, 'Reagan's
my boss and his stance is the one I'm going to
take,' "Connelly said.
Milady's position on aid typifies that of
many supporters of Reagan's budget, most of
whom argue that, while the Administration
supports higher education, it believes in the
principle of "access" rather than "choice "
They do not consider it a hardship chat ''not
everyone can attend a Harvard or a Georgetown," Connelly explained
Those who oppose the cuts argue that
choice of college is an integral part of the right
tu educauon and that, furthermore, the public
instirntions will be unable to handle the sudden influx of students that massive cuts wouid
cause
While several more congressmen came out
strongly against further cuts while testifying
yesterday before the House Subcommittee on
Higher Education, the New York Times yesterday reported that Reagan is "digging in his
heels" and refusing to consider any changes
in his budget p(opsals, or to offer support or
even comment on alternatives suggested by
Congress
Reagan's stiategy may be to stay quiet ir
hopes that, without his support, rio viable al
temative plan will surface, and then to pusl
his plan through easily because of lack of spe
cific oppsition, the Times article s a ! ~ -

And organizers wained that Reagan sup-po1ters may attempt 10 "bargain" by playing
against each other the two major threats to
aid-the Pell grants, cuts in direct aid tor
needy undergraduates, and the effo11 to cut all
graduate and· professional students off from
eligibility for guaranteed student loans
(GS Ls).
The GSL proposals are ''something of a red
herring," Dallas Martin, president of the National Association of Student Financial Aid
Administr~.i.ors, told the lobbyists He counseled that students counter any suggestion of
restoring the GSL~ in "exchange" for the Pell
grants by "telling them, 'We absolutely dismiss this; now let's look at the rest of your bad
pro_posals .' "
Congressmen can oppose further cuts in
education at three points in the coming
months. At the end of March they can vote to
continue the "continuing resolution" passed
last year in the absence of agreement on the
J982 fiscal budget; by July 1 they can vote to
amend the parts of the whole budget which
deal with student aid; between now and Labor
Day they can vote against changing the authorization laws to bar all graduate and professional stud~nts from participation in the
GSL programs.

-~- _ _ _ _

1

J

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co
m.ws-tR(8UKE

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WALTHAM, MA.

..--

D. 15,360

"'
L

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~

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.

Tuitions
~•
s.oar1ng
..
up, up. • •

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By PEGGY SIMPSON

WASHINGTON - More than
7,000 students lobbied Congress yesterday to resist President Reagan's
new cuts in student aid, which Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy said would "put
a dollar sign back on the doors of
schools and colleges of this country."
The students issued a not-very
veiled threat: they will work against
members who stay in lock step with
_Reagan irt his second ye~r of education cuts.
,
.
Part of the students' goal was accomplished just by showing up in
such visible numbers - one of the

11~~&;1~ter1t1iittt.
Bomb'.!..<.>n tbe other; ~ler rness~ge}i

:~=~~·~.:~.'o-~r: ::JJ:~~~!1izit'.
1

jor• cutAn ,gll_a.r~riteed student/
loans··· J.<···
·
·(:(j;/

. •. , .•--_._i•i:;;;y-.. day<tor o~~f

~{~"¥i<W

l've $~nHhe presi(jent .~ leJtei' t,l!f)
Ing him how bad the~

c1Jt$$:v,nlifi

y~ater:>

be'',the·au.treshman sai~
day putlog a quiet, <:hilly ~emopf>

$trc1tl<>11ioutslde _un?s tJ!atsh Char>-\
el( sije/atic:t Jabout\150.•-. ottier1{
st1.1d,0Jt~;rilog.~dn'li!li~tratot$.· gath..

•ered lo Voice 9pposlt1onto a• r,ro.:

PQ$~d}$479.imitlion'slastrln:Jhe·
)1tudehttlnanclal aid program/ ...· ......

!!f~!;t:J~!;r:ii~t~gir~i'

1


\Walk' President·• Daniel/:Pearl.rnan•/

;~;~r~~!e1~~t1'~~l!i

--

By Larry Grady
- Staff Writer
WALTHAM - Bentley and Regu;
Colleges- are expected to make
their announcements shortly, but
Boston College and Brandeis
University have already announceel tuition increases of more than
13 percent.
Brandeis will increase its tuition from $6,724 to $7,650 - a $950
boost. Room costs will go up $200
to $1,500 and board goes up $180 to
$1,855. That brings the basic
package to $11,105.
Boston College is jumping its
tuition $820 to $6,000. Room costs
are up $180 to $1,500 and board up
$166 to $1,600. The B.C. package is
now $9,280.
The Brandeis package has been
increased 13.85 percent and B.C.
13.7percent.
In addition to room board and
tuition, students must pay for
books, fees and sometimes
~cal coverage. Personal expenses such as clothing, travel
and recreation ·are estimated to
cost $950 above the direct costs at
~ ; d leads the way with a

Room co.
and boar1
basic, H,
$11,475. E
expenses
are inclu
$13,000pli
The Br,
their 13
because ,
cant, but1
percentaE
Universit,
Pennsylv,
vard.
At Bent
$4,550 wit!
$1,255 and
at $1,365.
Bentley T
act on ne:li
Itis expec
Regis C
lowest tui
lege in th
rooom anc
i is expectE
· creasesho

largest student demonstrations
since the Vietnam war, although
Sen. Paul 1,'songas, D-Mass., said
bluntly that-they would have had far
more impact if they'd come near the
unions~ 400,000 turnout at last fall's ;
Solidarity Day.
~
- Tsongas told the students they would have to use far more muscle '
than they have shown so far to re-, .
verse the Reagan side of con- ;:_;
servatism - and he suggested one ~":
good starting place would be the ;~0l
race this year between GOP. Rep. '{j'
Margaret Heckler, who has support-/
ed Reagan's budget, and Democratic :\
Rep. Barney Frank, who fought i.t. ';'i
That!s what many students al-".
_
·
ready plan to do.
Sara Thurin, a sophomore eco- '.
. nomics major at Wheaton College :,
who coordinated the trip here by up l
to 350 students from Massachusetts,·,;;
said she thinks 3,000 new voters can if/...
be signed up among st.udents in_ the f
H~ckler-Frank, c<;>ngressional · d. is--t1····
tr1ct.
'.!
More than 30 'students crowded··
,tuition of $8,195 - ~ o m $6,930.
into Heckler's office near the end of J
TUITIONge 9
the lobbying day with questions that:
>-bordered on the antagonistic: "This/
,
_
is the wrong place to cut ... I'm a' September 2,o_, )982\/ Xhe .8<Jsl<!!J,,llii,sin~S§.]oury_al / 15
single parent and I need these Ioan.:·~Ir·•-•---.-lllllii•--l!li--lllllii--....- - -...,..... . . . .
prgrams so I can get a job and sup-.~ ' ·

[li..-----------------------

port out of school and what about;:;i;
drop my family ... We may have tdct1our younger brothers and sisters?" .;
The students seemed won over atf
the end by Heckler's insistence that~
she would fight additional cuts in'
student aid, including eliminating,
loans for graduate school from the'
program or hiking loan interest~!
rates from 9 percent to 14 percent' -.
(and requiring repayment while the.~ W d S t 22 I
t · t St _t
·
h
·. . e . ep • . : n,Y.es_ men .. ra egy -.
t Uden t IS s t'll )n SC. OO1') • ,
1 ·
S

, , Suffolk University's School of' Manage~ent'.s 19.82;_83
Boston University Law Sch_ool; Distinguished Alumni Series presents RichardJ. Hoffman, vtce
st~dent Ed Reeves of Brookh?,e _ presidentap.d chref investme1_1t strategist for Merrill ~~ch,
said,; "Barney would go to the wire , Pierce, Fenner & Smith, Inc. He will speak on "The Investment
and I don't think shE: would if the., Outlookforthe 1980s." heldat4:45pqiinRoom929ofSuffolk's
president put on a Jot of pressure:f·, Frank_ Sawyer Building. Lecture is.free.-For more information,
.k
· · · -' call Karen Conor at 723-4700, X309.
_
c
l1 e las t year. "
_ .... • ~ _ _ _ _
,

iiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiii;i;i;i;i;i;i;

fTU it i On~

'.egis
lake
, but
deis
unc:han
tui~50

J200
Oto
lSiC

its
,sts
up
e is
~en

.c.

tnd

for
tes

From page 1
-----------~Room costs are up $180 to $1,430
and board is up $50 to $1,850. The
basic , Harvard package totals
$11,475. By the time the personal
expenses and other fees and books
are included it comes to about
$13,000 plus.
The Brandeis trustees said that
their 13.85 percent increase
because of inflation was significant, but it was still lower than the
percentage of increase at Boston
University, Brown, University of
Pennsylvania, Tufts and Harvard.
At Bentley Collge the tuition is
$4,550 with a 19 meal plan costing
$1,255 and freshman dorm rooms
at $1,365. A spokesman said the
Bentley Trustees are expected to
act on next year's tuition shortly.
It is expected to go up.
Regis College with one of the
lowest tuitions for a private college in the area at $4,025 and a
rooom and board charge of $2,630
i is expected to announce its in. crease shortly.

:?X-

ll'el
to
at

a
JO.
__l_r

-

rpal/15
:,,.'

,,

.

~!?..~' ~~~rnt~d~~~i ~g~

a ~:rw~•~gIB

the increase m the twt10n will be
$900.
Suffolk University continuous
continues to be one of the lowest in
the Boston area with a tuition of
$3,630 for next year - an increase
of$420.

cost $1,129 for tuition. Board and
room at UMass Amherst is additional. By the time that is paid and
the several fees and book costs
are added, a student at UMass
Amherst pays more than $5,000.

Students can borrow up to $2,500
Northeastern University has under the present federal pronot announced its tuitions for next gram and repay it after graduayear. Currently freshmen at Nor- tion at nine percent interest. The
theastern pay $1,400 for three
quarters. Upperclassmen pay
$1,950 per term. There are two
terms per year and the student
can work the other two terms to
help offset the college costs and
usually, get experience in the field
he or she hopes to enter.
The lowest cost education is still
the state college system.
Massachusetts Bay Community
College in Wellesley and Middlesex Community College in Bedford will cost $634 for tuition next
year if the Board of Regents present plans are excepted .
Framingham State's tuition will
be $845 as will most of the other
state colleges. Lowell University
will be $986.

/

A~~.:on~t~g

to cut back back on this billion
dollar program and a battle is expected in Congress.
,
There is also a loan program for ·
parents, but that is at 14 percent
interest and repayments start immediately.
Boston University has c,1nnounced that its tuition will go from
$6,300 to $7,175. Room and Board
will go from $2,970 to $3,400.
-J
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Bomb''.9n tl)e

pth~r.. Her message.;

wi:~2·~·!i~~r::: :iJ1Jo~~~~!1rti1~:
1

jor•·· cut)n .. •guar:antee<i

sfud~ntt

'~t"~fii;~:·d~/ t~r·~~ei{ ~, ;,~~~;.
l've senHhe presldertt-~l~ttert,l!f

Ing plm how bad thee cuts•wll!Xi/
be''l the au treshmansai~ )i~st~rjb
day puring qUIE!t, chilly· derrip!lio'.\
stt~ti<>tiiQ.Ut$lde un's ~~rsh Char>-+
eH Sfi~/andAabout>100·· ptt,er;;

a

.stud~oit~r~og ~dmlnistrat~t$. gath..
·. ered fo .vole~ opposilicm ·•·. to. a· pro.. ·.

<PQ&1;1d/ $479 <million slash··.··•n>the·
~~.$,lelit fh1aoclal aid program> ····· · .· · . .

'lliliilili

to 350 students from 1 assac use. s;'.(
said she thinks 3,000 new voters can 1ft
be signed up among stµdents in. the ,
He_ckler-Frank, congressional · dis._;,·

.
ii'
tr1et.
)•
More than 30 'students crowded-,
into Heckler's office near the end of j
the lobbying day with questions that·
bordered on the antagonistic: "This ,'. ·
is the wrong place to cut ... I'm a.·
single parent and I need these loan·[·
prgrams sb I can get a job and sup~)
port my family ... We may have td, ·
drop out of school and what about,,
our younger brothers and sisters?" .
The students seemed won over ait
the end by Heckler's insistence thatf
she would fight additional cuts in?
student aid, including eliminatingf
loans for graduate school from the.
program or hiking loan interest:'
rates from 9 percent to 14 percent"
(and requiring repayment while the.,·
student is still in school!).
'
Boston University Law School,
student Ed Reeves of Brookline 1 ~
said,; "Barney would go to the wire~·
and I don't think she would if the ·
president put on a lot of pressureif:.
like last year."
)

i

~
1
r<
t 'i
lrn
--- <>Luaent
tr.r two terms to
$1Ilege costs and
P1ence in the field
?nter.
ttJducation is still
aiege system.
$llY Community
noley and MidCollege in Bedmfor tuition next
13Jf Regents pre-

:pted.
twte's tuition will
bost of the other
i:q,E'ell University
pe1

-----.uunea to
cos.. •""" ,wove u111:: direct costs at

Harvard.
~~ard leads the

0. 15,360

way· with a
tuition of $8,195 -..rllff'from $6,930.

1
>-- TUmON-~ge9

New
•'•

JUL

J

anc

1lttlS-TRIBUIIE
WALTHAM, MA.

England
Ncwsclip

-

'

I

Septe"'!1ber_JQ, 19B2\1 ';I'h.~.JJostg~}:lu~ine~Jourpal / 15

Cosen for

o.g~Jc:1t, _-..
~.

' i~~t~~:~~h~c~:itc·~o:
Pres
(\ve., has been self'.cted as a ·1982
Offic~denftipal management intem by the U S
o ersonnel Management ll.t':-- Sc. .
will be employed as a
... i
ott
the Treasury Departm1:l!;~ment analyst in
Debt fn the Washingto
~U ?{Public
recent! .
n, O. C; .M1$1 , Scott
a~;e~eive.d a master's degree lil public
a on from Suffolk Universit ·
8 ·
Shet~as inducted"ntto tire
u,l,Ul,lj

M:!ng_.emen

1

.

Scho~I : :

s honor Society, Pi Alpha Alp~

Ca-tendar

I
Wed. Sep~., 22,: ~n,¥estment .StratC;?gy'. , .
S~ff.olk. Umvers1ty_s S;hool of- Management's 1982-83
D1st!ngu1shed Alu!ll~. Series presents Richard]. Hoffrrian, vice
~~es1dent. arid chref_ mvestment :strategist for Merrill LYIJ.ch
1erce, Fenner& Srmth, Inc. He. will speak on·.''The Investment
Outlook for the 1~80_s." held at 4:45 pqt in Room 929 of Suffolk's
FranKk_ Sawyer Buildmg. Lecture isfree;,For more information
ca11 aren Conor at 723-4700, X309.
· _ · '
.... &T

'I

-

SAUGUSADVERll8
SAUGUS, MA.
w. 7,000

w.

13 261

w.1.000

fife"'

JUN 241982

BAY STATE BUSINESS
WORLD
NORWOOD, MA.

~AMBRIDGE CHRONICLE
CAMBRIDGE, MA.
l!;D.gianu

JUL

Ne'llflcli1

~-~ ATTAINS HIGHEST HONORS.• t

81982

New
England

Suffolk University, has been
wtaclld as a AMliat in the
1982 Presidentf4ll Manag.

\

ment Intern Program. She

ii emp)O)'eed at the US

I

Treasury Department,

Bureau of Public Debt, In
Washington, DC.

•••

New

JUN 151982

.l!.ngian...
NeWlldii

r~~~~-)

"(\i

,

5.'

:·· r.

•.

~r~fty g'"stu .. ntR~~ag'ii1

n Day-

i::-':•r>\-.,~,.- '- ,"\,.

·'s'~it¢if:-afSuffo,~

~t att .;hing higliist·hcmorsa'of

Ji~f~iit tile Scliocil .of Management:_ She· was also the recipient oi
,-lneCWatl ·Su,eefJeurnal ,studen( Achievement Award in Business
'i\~t:nin(;fration ,-iiQd is a rne,rn9er of the D~Ita .:Alphll' Phi .Academt<:
:H:6~-- ~"qeiety ana W-1:to's Who _AJ;Dolig 'Studenfs in American
:tJriive'.~shjes: and. Colleges: Soi:ensoi(: a se,nior ai)d: a manage merit
,ffll!JO~,'r~ceives:heraward from Dr: Richard L. MeDo:w'ell, dean.of the
Sch<lol ofMa.ll!lgeniertt. More t~art 150 undergraduat~ students were
~bJ19red during the,Recognitii?~ :Dar:exercises. _·
'
·· . ./'.,: .. :.
- ' . · · - . '..:. .
..
-

'-.·

:,

'·'

A'f;TLEBORO ~·' The name of ·
. Martha Auerbach, chairwoman of
· the Attleboro library ' trustees
was .inadvertently omitted fro~
the caption of a picture on Page 3
of Saturday's Sun Chronicle. ,
MANAGEMENT TRAINING

Sergeant Leo Doyle completed
a three-week management course
which was co-sponsored by the
New England Association of
·Chiefs of Police and the Babson
College School of Continuing Education in Wellesley. Doyle who
was promoted to sergear;it on Jan.
10 was one of ~ officers to
complete the course.
VIDEO ARCADE HEARING

A public hearing on a proposal
to establish a 15-game video game
arcade at Washington Plaza is ·
scheduled for 7:30 p.m. today at
Council Chamber, City Hall. The
applicant is David Giovannucci of
Providence.

.lOSTON BUStNESS JD.URfW.l

BOSTOINl,.M

w.

45,000.

COUNCILWOMAN GETS HONOR

NOV 1 1982

New

England
Newsclip

Wed.. No~.-3f lnsur_ance in the 80s
.
Joseph J. Melone, executive vice president of the Prudentia:l In1
surance Co,. will speak on the insurance industry in the 80s. Part
of the ·Suff~lk · School of Management's Distinguished Speaker
Series. Imtt'.m roorti 927, Frank Sawyer.Building, 8 Ashburton
Pl., ,Boston. Admission is free. For more information, c~ Kare.!L,.,
Cqnnor at 723-4700 x309. ·
-

,

SEP 1 1982

NewscliP,

Paula J. Scott of 577
Franklin St., who la atudy·. :
ln& for her master's degree
in public administration at

·tt.'.

'i

New

. Judith · R,obbins of 20 Ashton
Road, a student in the master of
public administration program at
S~olk UniXfl:Sity, was recently
iil, ~cted i~to Pi Alpha Alpha, the·
national Ji9nor society,. for publie ·)
~ an9 administration. . ___/.

England
Nev1sr-!llP

/Grants ...
Suffolk University, Boston,
received a grant of $78,400
from the Department of Education for Public Service Fellowships in the Master il} Public
Administration program, Dr.
Richard L. McDowellt dean of
the School of Management,
announced. .
The 12 fellowships, which
' provide tuition and a stipend,
I are awarded to individuals,
including women, minortities,
and handicappild persons, who
• are members of groups which
ar!;! under-represented in the
public sector work force.
Fellows must also demonstrate
financial i:ieed, academ~c excellence, · and · a ·commitment to
public service.
Dr. Michael T. Lavin, assistant professor of public management and project director of
the grant, said; · '' Students
selected as fellows receive the
graduate education necessary
'to enter into the highest levels
of ' professional government
service.'' .
The fellowship students will
t:::their studies in the fall. /

BOS'IDIIDBB

Ti-it NEWTON TAB
NEWTON, MA
WP i9.U.6

BOSIOtLM&
D. l4BOJilUf

AUG 25 932

/1.u-l , ts' .

SEP 201982

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stretch/alignment classes
The studio is at 3 l f-1e'}'.
enwat
St , Bos For information,·
call 53&6340
The Boston Center for
Adult Education at 5 Com:A··
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·
:;i:~~· 0 :~,~i::k~orc::~~, monwealth Ave, . BoslO[),
.
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. ·
Z, mauon, 87&3877
has more 1han 400 courses
.co· choose from. Two--y,ee~ ,.'
i~~\:?,{;?;'t' " •';~;}_{
~r-::;:!!'~t
to ten-week courses, single
·session seminars and week1
1
~::~~l~:!n~oc7a: ~i~::; end workshops are offered
· '· •' ' '
·.
, t•;;; ;(~r.r,.';''! f;,i: ', ~'''!U,1 this fall on Tues and Thurs.
Studio space ;tVailable before
By ~lhy Hu(fl)ines
.
, !:': · ·,. :::.:/•.· · yn Jf 9:30-11:.~0 An{tlo-American ·and after dass for artists,
Adul(S have a lot to learn: quiJt~~lng, .draiwi,;ig, hqm~. folksongs and smging Sl)'les pho1ographers; practke
with denrcssion :~; as expressions of personal, space for dancers, actors,
buylng,auto.mamtenance,cop.,g., .··<;f;· ... ,,
social, and cultur'.u history
musicians For information,
there are almost a hundred differc;~I .lfea-:wi(,te 9 ~ For information, pll call 267-4430.
ciC>ns that provide quallfY edu,~Ji9g,t9,~tjf!,"'l,1.9J~~ d~Al\ 353.4020.
·
op tlleir full potentiat: The. tollpwJQg .~ &11$&~H~; The Massachuse"'- c~•. · f · II ·
·d •t d
tion ~ ·¥MCAs ~:,; lcgc of Art offers courses m
range o. co f&es, a. u~ e uca :- · ; .. : , ,,, ·,·:. ·: ·'i .· : : ,. all are-.15 of art, design, ar1
YWCAs, arts ;ind rel1~1ous Pf~~t~-W ~f!l!.flJ\8 f~tqi,. criticsm: canooning, com,
melit program~. For further liMi.IJ.~ ~~p CQ~king;J~<;: puter graphics workshop,
Ongoing/U~Ptnins ~ctio.q ,t.>f:
. . abi'. Af d , production and layou1 lech· ,; ; b : ;: ' .,, ,,
.. <1•i;~;:;:,:. 'S:·i. niquesor For faformation,
ToW:n <·,:,;:;. f,,::. ,,r.\~:'' :...,fr.ft'.'' '·'H.
,.,.o:J
--- •
write
phone t~ admisThe Main Course - is a
A F r e e 6 O H o p r
sions office at 731-2340,
unique concept in adult eduX33
· ·
Homemak er/Home
cation, offering one- night
Health Aide Training Samplings of some fall
classes from 6:30-9:JO Full
Course: - will be offered to courses at the Cambridge
course gourmc:1 dinners
people waming to care for Center for Adult l!du<.-aserved at every class
the sick and elderly b)' the tioo luclude: New llnwand
Get a Masters Degree Lo.
Courses begin Sep1 ,Wand
lntercommunil)' Home Clambake, Word Processing,
Public Administration Health Services, 474 Centre Office Politics fm Wooien,
are held in private homes in
at Suffolk University's
Parent Edui;atloq for !'aNewwn, Brookline, CamSchool of Management It
bridge, Boston. Over 50 difthers, and Mexican Cooking
combines public manageCall the Camhridge Center
ferent courses: Massage for
ment and heal1h administraCouples, Da1ing Over For.tr,
for details at 547-6789
tion Courses are offered in
WinelAsting. For informaThe Women's Educa
the evening at 8 Ashbunon
1ion, call 244-6894
tional and l~d"strlal
Place, Bos
support Group for WoUoion will presen1 a series
e Computer 11n•---·
men Job Hunters Inof workshops and seminars
· forma1ional lnterviewini> <;n

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RANDOLPH HERAIJ)

RANDOLPH, MA.

W. 2.400

JUNI 71982
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Charland inducted into honor society
RANDOLPH
John Edward
Charland of 267 Chestnut Wes~ Randolph, a student in the Masters of
Public Administration program at
Suffolk UniversUY, was ·rec~ntly ind'ucted into Pi Alpha Alpha, the
Natiollal Honor Soc_iety for Public
Affairs and Admiristration.
.·T!te: ~i Alpha Alpha · society is·
sponsored by th~ ~ational Association

--,
,

,

of Public Affairs and Administrators,
with membership bas~d · upon
scholarship. Only 20 per~ent of the
graduates of the Masters of Public
Administration program are eligible
for selection.
Suffolk University is one of 18 schools .,-.
nationwide which is a founding cJiapt:er ·
of-Pi Alpha Alpha.
___.J

B.~SINE~~ ~~[\LENI

·., . seit.i~

W!tler Opportun:fti.~s
fot'Women, seminar,
41'3 Common~ealth
av,, 6 p.Ql;-8 p.m.; focu~· on how to cope
wtt,h uncertainties,
work identity and immobility in life/career.
(R~is.437-1040)
Realty Income Trust,
Pr~vidence, annual
meeting, Director's,
Room, Industrial Natiopal Bank of Rhode
Island, 111 Westminster st., 10 a.m.
Japan Society of
13oston Inc., annual
meeting, Enterprise
Room, State Street
Bank Bldg~. "225 ,
Fr~1pklin st., 5:30 p.m.
Ad,vertising Club of
G~~_ater Bosto11, 22d
an,p.ual
Hatch
A wards, Park Plaza
Castle, 5:30 -10:45
p.m . (Res. 262-ilOO)
Bos~on Se~urity Anait.sts Society, luncheon/meeting, Alexancter Parris Room,
Quincy Market, 12
P·Ill·; Guest speakers,
Thomas A. Holmes
ch~irman and Cly d~
H. .Folley, senior vice
prt;5ident and chief executive. officer, IngerSQII Rand.
, Sept. 21
International Business Center of New
En-gland, seminar
MI1: Penthouse, 50 Me~
morial drtv-:e,. cam-:
bridge, -9~a.m.-:.4:'30
P-~.; topic, ''Export~
ing: Basic Considerati?ns i.Q Finding, Enten.ng and Developing
International Mar-

~ets."

.

'

Boston. Security 1Analy'sts Society, breakfas1Jmeeting, Alexa1;1der Parris Room,
Quincy Market, 7:45
a.m.-9 a.m.; guest
speaker, Kenneth w .
R\nd, chairman, Oxford Venture Corp.;
topic, "What Analysts
Stlould ,Know About
th~ Venture Capital
Pr~ess - How Investors.Benefit From Venture (\mib I "

¥enner &
topic, "l
Strategy
1980s."
Se]
Boston S
alysts Sc
cheon/mt
covery E
England
12 p.m.; ~
er, J. St~

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SEP 201982

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,,·<tti Pouery, 25 l'irst St, Ca~-

enwat
.
Bos For . informauon;
pill 536-6340
''./- /, } '.·' :r')':,t"''.
'rhe Boston Center for
Adult Education, al 5 Com:~, : . ; • . rgh·\
a:ii::k~orc::~~\ monwealth A\re, Boston,
tias more than 400 courses
01
Profes- to· choose from Two-,y,ee~ ,,
; ';;fl··:'••.': ·. · :;,>-!' sors Program ~t Bo.ston 10 ten-week courses, singlel11~~-~'\'{i University -;--- ~m·. offer . session seminars and week~:.l'f.l!li(i-, ~. .. . l'olksongs and social H1scory end workshops are offered
Studio space available before
7
T~~~l:,..~:~i~~!; ~nd after class for artists,
folksvngs and singing styles photographers; pr_a~uce
iug,. . . ...: ' n. ~;, as expressions of personal, space for dan':ers, actors,
~,l'~!l ":• , ' social, and cµltUl"..U blSIOry
musicians For mfonnauon,
;),r~'.\Yide 9 f ~ , For· informatio~. pll call 267-4430.
,~b~P-il®'t~ d~~l-, 353.4020.
· ·
:~- '· ·. ·· ·· ' ·• -•':'.ttii:;J, The Massachuse«. Co:1·
lcgc of Art offers courses m
~ ( _Y.J4F ~... all areas of art, design, art
i§j(f9{f~(i~g ~~!~:'.f criticsm: canooning, com,
·''j.eq> cb~kmgtfl:if ;_ pu1er graphtes workshop,
~
Ar .
. production and_ layoul tech, ··
-:,;;:::,f,j:::t,,; ;;~, niquesor For 1nforma1JOll,
write
phone the admissions ortke al 7:}1-2340,
•ee 60 Hollr
emaker/llomc:
X33
II Alde Tralnlng Samplings of some fall
c _ will be offere<) _10 courses at the Cambridge
wanting 10 care lor Center for Adult lldu<.-ak al\d elderly by the tion include: New En~and
·ommunity Home Clambake, word Processing,
Get a Masters Degree ln. ·
; Services, 474 Centre Office Politics for Wonien,
Public Administration at Suffolk University's
P;ireOI Edu<.:a!IOQ for . l•a·
School of Management It
1hers, and Mexican Cookmg.
combines public manageCall 1hc Cambridge Ceiiter
ment and health administrafor details at 547-6789
tion Courses are offered in
The Women's Educa
the evening at 8 Ashbunon
tional and •,d:11!i&rlal
Place, Bos
·
Union will present a series
C Computer l>n••·-·
of workshops and seminars
'

.
·
. ";, · ..., " ,.,.. -1

•·\ handbuilding area, gla_ze
· .'c room and four ~ilns Begm;, }J 'ning, intermediate, hand-

BUSI~·E~S CALENDAR·-- •
. .
~1,,,\(;\J
' ,.

~tretch/alignment 31 Me'};
The studio is al classes

''· Se t. 20' 1'ennet & Smith· Inc.; chairman, IngersoJJ,
Wicler Opportuniti~ topic, ''Investment Rand.
,,.
for(Women, seniiniii; Strategy. for, , the
Sept. ·24
413 Commonwealth· 1980s." ·

International Busiav._, 6 p.rp.-8 p·.m.; foSept. 23f
· ness Center of New
cu~· on how to cope .. B011to~ Security An,- Engla_.d; seminar,
wi:t,h uncertainties, alysts Society;; luri- Babson Co1Jege, To-

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1JPYJ.Jl. ".' ~~ t!I::r:r:y

;Ji;;,)j/tl \ t;,, ~i ~~~~~~I::~~
' dra'w~s. ll<lffi~

1t4

~..~' ~~~r~,· : ,
' ... ·,Tabs·

wo:tk identity and imrriol;>flity ii} life/career.
(Regis.437-1040)
.·.

Realty Income Trust,
PrQvidence, annual
meeting, Director's\
Room, Industrial National Bank of Rhode
Isla'nd, 111 Westminster st, 10 a.m.

Japan Society of
~ston Inc., annual
meeting; Enterprise
Room, State Street
Bank Bldg,, -225
Franklin st., 5:30 p.m.

Aclvertising Club of
Gr~_ater Boston, 22d
an)1ual

Hatch

A waru.s, Park Plaza.

Castle, 5:30 -10:45

p.in. (Res. 262-i 100)
Bos~on Security Analysts Society, luncheon/meeting, Alexander Parris Room,
Quincy Market, 12
p.f11.; Guest speakers,
Thpmas A. Holmes,
chairman and Cly de
H. 'Folley, senior vice
pr~ident and chief executive officer, Ingersqll Rand.
. Sept. 21 .

International Business ·Cepter of New
England, "seminar,

1ducted into honor society
Edward
~es~ Ranlasters of
>gram at
c~tly inlpha, the
or Public

of Public Affairs and Administrators,
with membership based upon
scholarship. Only 20 per~ent of the
graduates of the Masters Of ~~lie
Administration program are eligible
for selection.

Suffolk University is one of 1~ schools
;ociety is' nationwide which is a founding c.hapter
.ssociation - of :pi Alpha Alpha.
. _
__J

MlT Penthouse, 50 Mem.oria I drive/ Cambridge, 9 a.in.-4;'30
p.m.; topic, "Export~
ing: Basic Considerations in Finding, Enter{ng and Developing
In.terna tional Mar-

~<:;ts."

·

Boston. Security ,Analr,sts.Society, breakfast/ meeting, Alexan.der Parris Room,
Qufncy Market, 7:45
a.m.-9 a.m.; guest
speaker, Kenneth W.
Rjnd, chairman, Oxford Venture Corp.;
topic, "What Analysts
Should /Know About
th~ Venture Capital
Prbeess - How Invest0rs. Benefit From Ven-

cheon/riieeting¥ Discovery>Barge(Ne\V
England Aquatlum,
12 p.m.; ~guest speaker, J. Stanley Covey,
_ _>_:_
--

mass.o Hau, WeUesley,
,9 a:m.-3 p.m.; topic,
"Planning and Executing International
Market R~earch."

1
1

,,, --- ---1,,~•3,
for details

.il

547-6789

The women's Educa
donal and l~d.llstrlal
Union will present .i series
of workshops :.and semin.irs

Jver i"OCJY,
r informa14
I for WO-

ment ana health administration Courses are offered in
the evening at 8 Ashbu_rwn
Place, Uos
·

c Computer p,.... -·

:C8 IO·
viewin-' '"

International Business Ceiltet of New
England, .seminar,

New

982

1u1.1-

cheon/meeting, Alex~
anl;ler Parris Room,
Quincy Market, 12
p.111.; Guest speakers,
Thpmas A. Holmes,
ch~irman and Cly de
H. ,Folley, senior vice
president and chief executive . officer, Ingersqll Rand.
. Sept. 21

~gJanu

Ne'Wiicli1
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ltarland inducted into honor society
of Public Affairs and Administrators,
with membership based upon
scholarship. Only 20 per~ent of the
graduates ~- the .Masters of Public
Administration program are eligible
for selection.

\

,PH John Edward
1267 Chestnut West, Ran:udent in the Masters of
IIlinistration program at
1versiry:, was recently in1> Pi Alpha Alpha,
the
.
.
[onor Society for Public
SUffolk ljniversity is one of 18 schools ·
Admiristration.
Alpha ·Alpha · society is' nationwide which is a founding chapter
_,.)_
1y th~ National.Association · of Pi Alpha Alpha.

MIT Penthouse, 50 Memorial drtve. cam-·
bridge; !fa.ti1.-c4:'30
p.m.; topic, "Exporting: Basic Considerations in Finding, Entedp.g and Developing
International Mar-

~~ts."

.

Be>ston .Security ,AnalY,!3ts Society, breakfast/meeting, Alexc1.uder Parris Room,
Qufncy Market, 7:45
a.m.-9 a.m.; guest
speaker, Kenneth W.
Rind, chairman, Oxford Venture Corp.;
topic, "What Analysts
Should ,Know About
the,'Venture Capital
Prdcess - How Investe>rs. Benefit From Venture Capital."

North American Society for Corpol'.ate
Planning Inc., din-

ner)meeting. Marriott
Hotel, Newton, 6 p.m.;
guest speaker, Lester
Th(!row, professor of
~cqnomics, . · Sloan
School of Manage:m~n t, MIT; topic,
"Cprporate Planning
in ;a Period of Strucc
(ufal Change."

Gr;eater
Boston
Chamber of Com- .
merce; Executives
Clqb luncheon, Copley
Pl'aza, main ballroom
121 p.m.; .guest speak~
er,; James F. Carlin,
~retary of transportation & construction .
i
.

, Sept. 22
Infernational Business Center of New
E~gland, workshop,
Sh~ra ton-Lexington,
3:~0 -6:30 p.m.; topic
"11:lx Treatment Fo;
US) Expatriates."

SuffglkJiniversity
Sc~ool of Management, Alumni Series.
Sai'7yer Building. Ash~
bu,rton Place, 4:45
p.tj1.; speaker, Richarq J. Hoffman. vice
president and chief in-- ve1t~1ent strategist,
MernH_Lynch Pierce

:

JAMAICA Pl.AJN CJ11ZEN
AND ROXBURY cmm,
HYDE PARK, MA.

w.

sodtmBB
llOSTON.i MA.

4,800

JUN 10 1982

a.~···---

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NOV 151982

NeWscli1,

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; lt,in,rheo11f ri,i~~)~g,. ~g
i',fi,e:xander ; Parris : .. , ,
. .
'.',.t~~· Quincy Market, IJ,J~11.stpess ~·/Edi·' ?J:_ pc,m): / ~~af(er, ~P...tlunch~Pt,~eet~,
~no.mas l<t Williams, ~ Stu~ st.,
'::1tl:aii;:mart'aaj eKeCti~ '
'.

12 ,p'.m.•

\t,Jve officer~. First .At,; · l'IDciaf'Planning, semi>J~nta Corp..,,Atlanta. . ~intr~~ 7:30 p.m.:;' "De. · ,. '. : · '
·
~rag~ty fo.r the I980's."
..
.'( 'The Financial ll'o,. · ~23~,;~167}
·
n.t~.seminar, 50Mi1k · 's,Ce'nter of New Eng,l'>;t:,,6 p.m,.; speaker,· :1 Hilton. I-95 Route 128,
' !ti:~"''. .·. Tayinore. p p.m.; "Cutting Costs
&hrn · · "Put
,Management." ·
1
· ' ·,· ·.
zer; , · .· · ting It · onal and Industdal
,~JI· Together: Con- , ·
\~ct1ng, Implement- f Boylstt>n st., 5:30.p.m.-c
smg and Monitoring iieflts: W}lat Job Hunters
l,.orl Legner. 9f. · 309 Pond street,
Jamaica Plain, was the recipient of the
Griffin Manning ~ward : at Student
Recognition Day ceremonies at
Suffo k· University. She Is also a
memf>er o
e Del.ta Alpha Pl

t:oe Ffnanci;iI Plan."·

Academic Honor Society. Legner, a
se"lor and an accounting major, re,
celves congratulations from Dr.
Richard L. McDowell, dean of the
~chool of Management.

1

-,,

.

'

/;<Nov. lS.:Nov. 16
?/:'Technical car- t!!"!'_.""!11"~""
"7.ob . . . · - ..
~~ Northeast on and Inven:tory Con-'
'../J:Ide,. Ce9ter; Wo- Marriott Hotel, Newfon,
pu;m; JI ~m,.: 9 p.m.; iter." \
.
!25 _major c<>mpante; to l ., · ·
·. ·
,PJlrti¢ipate; sponsored l,~es'il;i~titute. Boston
b 3·
}mg, Holiday Inn, 399
X) usiness. People n.; speaker, Victor, F. Al{nc; Minneaoolis· ·
fr, Peat; Marwick, Mitch•.::_. 1;,,,, :Nov. 16. • ' , .· )ty Circles: Four Keys to
S~niicon ~hle~, . 10 ext. 3210)
~rliilgtoJi, annual· r Executives of Greater
,~ettpg;, IS New Eng" ~Hotel, 3 p.m.-5:30p.m.;
land. Ex~tive Park, . ~nzer, president, Saxon
J(}~;Jli,.
·
/P Ltd.; topic,''Selling By
i '
'

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(Duette Photographers)

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Seminars and 1nstittites::.r~l
Suffolk Universi_!I's Sociology
Depai lmehf is sponsoring a summer institute for Human Factors in
Aviatron.

· The program. which began August 2 and runs until the 13th under the direction of Dr. John L. Sulltvan. professor of sociology at Suffolk, is featuring panels by avi-

ation professtonals and sociologists
and offer airline personnel acadenlic cred!t.

0 ..
---'L'll-1..-.....i

Single copies of the study, HEP
Report No. 54, are available free:
from the Higher Education' PaneJ,
American Council on Education
Panel, 1 Dupont Circle, Washing~
ton. D.C; 20036.

0

AdelP;hi UmDDity~s lastimte

of liu.•••&1atic aa4 Pldlatelic
Sta.dies of Garden ctty, N.Y:..·~111
present a t h ~ y ~ in rye

· ~ "-COin grading and, authenticating
\.....

H,;,.

fro~~ AtJ&ustc';~".J,~;~\,,~)J;pi: .

An-

IV· 17 ..

... Ysts ~ . break-

) Association. Boston
~t National Bank of Bo$"
.~
·.t~taip.ing Business cu<•


,f~st/meeting, · The
li:trker House, 7:45
a:-m,; speaker. Dr.
~wrence Foley, man-

;agement psychologist.,
.~Ordli, Wilson Associ-

ates; "An Analysis of
,M.anagement .Styles
attc( their Impact on
_corporate Objective

;

Jves Institute, Bostoi
,g'. .Marriott Hotel, New_:
,.· William M. McCormick'

·t American Express Co.'i
f:PTt!SS Going?" (Info. 421:·

1-;

..

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-

.

ty ~chool of Manage:rnment forum, Parker
,~ a.m.; topic, "Busipess
· The New England
Coun~l Inc., annual,, :1te to. Co~trol Hospital
c9,nference...(;o.pley i:nt Institute, New Eng-•
P,'faza Hotel, · 11 :45 'meeting, Re.d Coach Grill, •
fl:);µ.- 5 :50 .P,m;; panel iewton, 5:30 p.m.; speakBf ,speakers: reception Inc.;."~The Use of Proil>rt
~a dinner honoring . Str t
:,~chard l).. Hillr Shera-'
7-N!v~f~ Planning:i
~-oBost:on, B:15 "9:15. ess Center ~f N~w Eng,:~$+~t.n:¢,tals~ker. ~I-Hilton. Wakefield, 8:30
an,d Results,"

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Truratlon

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JAMAICA PLAIN CITIZEN
AND ROXBURY cmm,
HYDE PARK, MA.
w. 4,800

JUN 10 1982

... /-·

""

New
Engtanct

Ne"'Wscli1,

..·.:, ..
......
~

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1:aus1Nlss
CALJNDAR.
1
Con~w1~~if.~om,p~e~~ ~ ·
if/,i;.l, .'

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~eri~ ·s~!efy qf~~ess Pre$8/Edi-.
tor;it New . . Ellgtan~· C:&ap~r\ luncheop/~eet-.

ing:; 57
1

R~ta_urant. 200
"Editorial Burnout.'' .

Stu¥ st., :i2:;p:m.;
. .\

Th.~¢ellterl,for. Ffna:nciaf'-Planni:ng. semi-.
nar, Sh~ton-,tara: '$rain~~ 7:30 p.m.("DevelopNJg,a Fl'natjfiaLstragety for the 1980's.''
(Info. 848-6aBO. di. 1-800~232~8167}
·
lnterritio~i Busbiess Ceilter of New England, seminar, Colonial Hilton. 1-95 Route 128,
Walt~field, 9 a.m ..-4:30. p.m.; "Cutting Costs
Thr~>Ugh Transit Risk Management."

Women's Educational and Industrial
Union. workshop, 356 Boylston st., 5:30 p.m.-.

l,.orl Legner 91 · 309 Pond street,
Jamaica Plaln, was the recipient of the
Griffin Manning ~ward :at Student
Recognition . Day ceremonies at
Suffolk' University. She is also a
member of the Delta Alpha Pi

7:30 p.m.; "Pay and, Benefits: What Job Hunters
Need to Know.''

Academic Honor Society. LElgner, a
sen.ior and an accounting major, re·
celves congratulations from Dr.
Richard L. McDowell, dean of the
~chool of Management.

· Massachusetts Assn. for Mental aealth.
conference, Harvard. Club: 374 Cdmmonwealth
,, a,r l om-5 9 IO,; ;·wnrk~oc!~ctivity. and
· · ~ .,

Mental Health.

a,,;=P.·,,, . ,__

.

. .. ~ e r l ~ P~~uc~on and Inventory Con--·
~~i~,,sem\t.}l;U,i Marriott Hotel, NewtQn,
6 {>.alp.; Ap<>,llo Compµtet.'' \
. ••.·

(Duett, Photographers)

,, ',Plaliilingi Executives· l.D!iititute, Boston .
Chapter, dinner/meeting, .Holiday Inn, 899
Grove st., Boston, 6 p.m.; speaker, Vicfor, F. Albanese, ~enior manager, Peat. Marwick, Mitchell,~ Co:: topic. "Quality Circles: Four Keys to
Su12eess. (res. 369-8600 ext. 321()}
Sales ~ Marketing 'Executives of Greater
. Boston. m~ting, Lenox Hotel. 3 p.m.-5:30 p.m.;
, spdlker, · Michael J. Enzer, president, Saxon
,) Co1!mw,iic~tions Group Ltd.; topic,''Selling By
Semmar."
,
i
,_.
~:
-.
Nov. 17

'

:, :

•s •

s.

lo

Seminars and 1nstitutesJ:
SUffolk Universt!I•s. Socioiogy
Depai
is sponsoring a sum-

unent

. mer institute for Human Factors in

,

11te

t-

Aviation.
The program. which began August 2 and runs until the 13th under the direction of Dr. John L. SulliVan, professor of sociology at Suffolk. is featuring panels by aviation professi6nals and ~o!ogtsts

and offer airline personnel aca-

. .

demic credit. .

0.

---'L'~-L-...:

. ton~ 1?, J;>.m.; t9gic, "Entertaining Business Clh ·
.• ents;
·' · ·
·
1

J.

Single copies of the study, HEP
Report No. 54, are available free:
from the Higher Education' PaneJ,
American Council on Education
Panel. 1 Dupont Circle, Washing~
ton. D.C: 20036.

,:

. ~na,ncial ·:~zecutivea I~stitute. Boston

r, Cha,ptef.. ;clµino/{meeting, Marriott Hotel, Newf ton, 6:~0 p.~.; spea~er.·wrn1am M. McCormick~
:xec~tiv~ vice presiderit, American Express Co.;
' ~frr!.~,AmeqcanE1q>ressGoing?" (Info. 421,.

, 77;j41



,.

·

.

·

· .

,
Suffolk. lJniversity School of Manage~ m~. ,flUSfuc;:&sfgovernrrient forum, Parker

0

A«lelpld Uniunity~s lastitute

of Num.lsJnatic. _.a Plill.atelic
Studies of Garden C\ty, N.y./v.;ill
present a three,day ~ in rare

grading and,. authentieating
from,Aug_ustt~'~~.•t~:t.fpi:
...
.. .
. . .

· ~ ~.coin

... .... ~.

W-omen In Sales Association. Boston

· 1 Chapter. meeting..First National Bank of Bose

-

~

: Ho~~· Pr~ ~oom1, 7:45 a.m.; tol_)ic, "Busip.ess
;: ~~s~'ov~rnment Unite to Control Hospital

~

Project ·.~anage111ent Institute•. N~w Eng-

, land Cha~fer. ~inner/meeting, Red Coach Grill,:
~ 3~ Washmgton st., Newton, 5:30 p.m.; speak-.
• er, ~I ~ulvey, fJ~blein,Inc.; ''The Use of Project
Planhmg Techmques in Strategic Planning.''.
Nov. 17-Nov. 18
. lnterna~nal Business Center ~f New Eag' land, seminar, ·Colonial-Hilton, Wakefield, 8:30
,: a.m.-4:30 p.m.; "Multinational Taxation for Financial Management,"
·
·

DAILfTIMES
WOBURN MA.

BOSTON SUNDA'i GLOBS
BOSTON, MA

o.w~

s.

OEC 15 1982

€06,329

DEC 19 1982

Rol')ayne~fCf

c-

.

administer gJaht ...
, WINCHESTER - Suffolk
; University has received a grantof
$399,63"f from the U.S. Department of Education 'for the first
year of a four-year program
approved ·under the Institutional
Aid Program,· Title· III of the
Higher Education Act; to be urider
the direction of a Winchester man.
The grant will enable the
university to implement its longrange plan. The project. will be
run by Dr. Michael R. ''.ffonayne,
Dean of the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences, wbo makes his
homeonHollywoodRoa&
·. ·
Ronayne also served a~ project
.director for a Title III grant of
$250,000 obtained · last year in.
which the univ~rsity establis_hed a
Learning Resource Center.
President DanielH. Perlman, in
announcing the grant, said that
under this year's' grant, .the
univers~ty will be aple to int:. pleme,t its long-range plan

1··
·

Pioneer~
.

'

.

Local educator reviews
·the history· of scubadiving
By Rhea Becker
Scuba divers may flock
' to Honolulu or Jamaica for
a dive, but these vacation
spots were not the birthplaces of the sport. In
1960, the Boston YMCA
on Huntington Avenue
held the first Scuba Instructor Ins!itute in the
country - a forum where
persons were trained to instruct and certify others in
the sport.
By the mid-60s, New Scuba Boston-style as demonstrated by Gerald
England was the second Comeau.
most popular diving spot own.
owns 800 pools in the
in the country. Today, CalGerald Comeau , a di·v·e·r u·lllted States and they
·
ifornia and Florida have for 28 years and teacher of came up w1'th aski·n diving
taken the lead, but New Applied Physics an._d PhysEngland still has "some of iology in the Mar1·ne Sc1·- course outline," he says.
T0 day, there ar.e about
· ·
the finest diving spots in ences Program at Boston's 1 o o o · ·
·
h
,
0 people in
t e COllntry" and possibly Suffolk University, recalls Massachusetts trained to
• the .wqrld, . says John how~ discovered scuba dive, says Comeau and he
. Butler, _manager of ~ast divingwhileit_wasiµitsin-· . has personally ~tructed
.
, CoastcJ)iv..ers,..a..Bioo~m~~fancyc. 'JBacl{, in,...4'954:;-+-~--more than,--Z.:600"'$ersi';ns:-- ,.
, scuba retail shop, pi~i~f in. "'f_I!.t,J~l,,.~~e:·s.Beach one ,Comeau is c~Jebrating-~
the. _northeast , requues day and I saw this kid in_ twentieth anniversary with
',addmonal equinmPnt hP. •h= .;.,-•-- •••- -''-.
.
· ..
I

Ne.~Iip

,t;.

'7"919

EXTRA CREDIT
.
..

I ~ting the· .c>dd~

through.the followin_ g a_ ctivitie.s:I~-~-.
-Continued development oft
univer~ity's new Learni •
Resource, Center to. impro ·
student retention.
· ·
~
-Curriculum development \J.,
meet high technology need& , .
·,
du,cfJng n_~w majors in compu_t ·'
ertgmeermg technology a , •
e l e c t r o n i c- e n g i n e e r i n •
technology.
·
• .•
- Im pro vent e n t of th j'J.
university's administrativfl.
servi~~s. and its · planninrJ.
capab1hty.
.
ti'J
-Improvement of careeji
planning and placement services._~
- Improvement of instruction~
programs and advising to erif.
courage women and minoritjl ·
students to pi,-epare for careers. if1.
-Establishment of a facultrJ.
development program.
1
-Development of a progra~ · •
international management in t · •
School of Ma~agement
·if

r tJndetwater
-

1 1?7~

New
Enpmd

,.

'

.

never walked for fun be)
By Phylli~ Coons
block. Wheh I. b¢gart wa
Globe Sta.ff
would call to rile and cheer
"Tears are to be expected, laughter to don't think I Will ever go ba1
be savored, th01,1.gh ! would i;iot trade my ly existence. 1 (\on 't cry for
tears for rriore laughter nor my laughter My pray~rSl11;tve been answ,
for more tears, for they are proof that I am becotne· stronger. When I
alive.''
·
who looks the way I used
So wrote Lisa Gillis of West Roxbury for .make them smile, and usua
Techn,tcally S~king, the Boston Technt~ - FitzroYChappelle, a stuc
cal School newspaper. If there is any doubt Park who has carried Gill
about the quality of Lisa Gillis' life, a brief since they were freshmen, i
talk with her dispels it.
Lisa, a!J right~ I've never sei
The smile that warms her fa,ce and enemy. 'She's good to talk
brown eyes draws attention away from her said that she's an all-roum
crutches.
• writes. very well and_ is ar.
The 18-year-old senior was born with pre-engineering program a1
cerebral pa.lsy and has ~n fighting odd~.. sity. . __ .. _ . .• .
,
all her life. '
Gillis' "dotl.bt,· ··Dr., Mar~
Christopher P. Lane, headmaster of says, "I have never seen Li
Boston Technical High School, says, "As really downhearted, despite
we observe her on a daily basis, going erations. She is a tremendo1
thrqugh the corridors, utilizing the plenty of guts." .
.
crutches which she needs to transport herBut it is not just Gillii
self, we ourselves' are imbued with a~1 al- ability to mak'e people fee
most magical inspiration, with a height- pr;ompted Boston Technic;il
' ened sense of caring and awareness for the , nominate her" for a top awa
plight of others."
.
,,
ship from. the National.
'Tm an optimist essentially, Gilli's· Christians and Jews. She,
says.
,
·
1

University Awa.rd for excell
But there have been times when dis- isrri;"m1d the Margaret De
couragement prevailed.
for outstanding achieveme1
"I was a recluse for a while. I was feel- grade, she won the Alice C
ing a uttle bitter after my last operation . brotherhood. She also tuto
five years ago. I had taught myself to walk retarded 15-year,old cousin
L'ane says of Gillis: "It i:
by bracing my knees together, The op~ration was supposed to correct that, but in- of thefaculty, the students
stead, I found that I had to use crutches all istration that Gillis epitomi
good-will and, brotherhood
the time, which I had not had to before.
''So I stayed in my room. My family to achieve andJc:ister. Lis.a
used to call me- 'the ghost' when_ I would · nary human being."
\
· come out. Then I discovered walking. I had GILLIS, Page AI8

THE CAMBRIDGE TAB.
CAMBRIDGE. MA

w. 55,000

SEP 22 1982

~

Eng].ana
Newsdii>

DAILfTIMES
WOBURN MA.

D.

BOSTON SUNDA'I'. GLOB.E
BOSTON, MA

W;lr.·

s.

DEC 15 1982

GoS,3.89

DEC 191982

New

.Ro-na~yn e -to--:----.~----~------i ?·~
administer Qtoht . I
Beating the .~
Nm.m:lip

E~

N~I:ip

j

~

· WINCHESTER -:, Suffolk
·. University has received a grant of
$399,63T from the U.S. Depart-.
ment of Education ·for the first
year of a four-year program
approved under the Institutional
Aid Program,' Title Ill of the
Higher Education Act~ to be under
the direction of a Winchester man.
The grant will enable the
university to implement its longrange plan. The project will be
run by Dr. Michael R. 'Bonayne,
Dean of the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences, wbo makes his
home on Holly\\'OOd Road~
., .
Ronayne also served a~ project
.director for a Title III grant of
$250,000 obtained -1ast year in
which the univ~rsity established a
Learning Resource Center.
President Daniel H. Perlman, in
announcing the grant, said that
under this year'.s' grant, .the
univers~ty will be a~le to im- '
-~~ its long-range plan

through· the foilowin. g a. ctivities :ljj.1•
- Con,tinued development of t.
university's new Learni. ,
Resource· Center to impro ' •
·
~
student retention.
~ Currfouluin development fl!
meet high technology need$ iQ'J
clu~ing. n. ew majors in c.o.mpu1t·
engineering technology a • •
electronic- engineer in •
·
:••
technology.
- Improvement of thj'J.
university's administrativf).
services and its planninrJ.
capability.
;;j
- Improvement of careeJ;;i
planning and placem~nt servi~es~
- Improvement of mstruction~
programs and advising to ell'r. .
courage women and minori~ ·
students to prepare for careers. ft
- Establishment of a facuUrJ.
development pr.ogram.
; , ••
- Deveiopment of a prograID · •
international management in t . •:
i~
School of Management

(' lJnderivater Pioneer

'j

Local educator reviews
- the history·of scubadiving

By Rhea Becker
Scuba divers may flock
' to Hono.lulu or Jamaica for
a dive, but these vacation
spots were not the birthplaces of the sport. In
I 960, the Boston YMCA · z
on Huntington Avenue 5l
held the first Scuba Ins- ~
tructor Institute in the ~
country - a forum where ~
persons were trained to in- iii
struct and certify others in ~
the sport.
· if:
By the mid-60s, New
England was the second
most popular diving spot
in the country. Today, California and Florida have
taken the lead, but New /
England still has "some of
the finest diving spots in
the cou.ntry and pqssibly
, the world," . says John
Butler, _manager of ~ast .

Scuba Boston-style as demonstrated by Gerald

Comeau.
own.
()Wns 800 p ols in the
9
Gerald Comeau a diver Ullited States and they
for 28 years and t~cher o· f came up wtth a skin diving
·
Applied Physics and Phys- course ou ti ine," he says.
·
iology 1·n the Mar1·ne Sc1·T d
·
o ay, there ar.e about
ences Program at Boston's I o, o o p e O p I e · in
Suffolk University, recalls Massachusetts trained to
how""ik discovered scuba dive, says Comeau .and he
diving while it was in its ii::v _has personally ~tructed
.
-Coastd:)w,ers,-,.a.;Br,oo~~-fllncy.. '-'Back- i-R-l954r~+,~--more ·th'an·2 •(:JO(hpersons:- - -.cc
, scuba re~ail shop; Di~,;1~? in ., \Ve:9.t_.!9 9;,:ipe's Beach one ,, Comeau is c~lebrating-h~
the. _northeast . req,uu;es
day. and I saw this kid in twentieth anniversary with
· addit10nal eouinmPnt h... •h~ ..._. __ -·-- ~·.




EXTRA CREDIT

never walke<l l
By Phyll~ Coons
block. when 1
Globe Staff
would call to ,m
"Tears are to be expected, laughter to don't think I tyil
be savored, though ! would not trade my ly existence. I di
tears for more laughter nor 'my laughter My prayerS11l~vt
for more tears, for they are proof that I am become· strange
alive.''
.
. .
who looks the
So wrote Lisa Gillis of West Roxbury for make them. smil
Techn,ically SJ)Cl:lking. the Boston Techni-' ·
Fitzroy Chap
cal School newspaper. If there is any doubt Park who has
·about the quality of Lisa Gillis' life, a brief since they were
talk with her dispels it.

Lisa. a!J right. I'
The smile that warms her fl:lce and enemy. -She's gc
brown eyes draws attention away from her said that she's i
crutches.
writes very wel
The .18-year-old senior was born with pre-engineering
cerebral palsy and has !Jeen fighting odds_ .. sity.
_ _. __
..
all her life. '
·
·
Gillis' --doctor
Christopher P. Lane, headmaster of says, "I have m
Boston Technical High School, says, "As really down.heat
we observe her on a daily basis, going erations. She is :
through the corridors. utilizing the plenty of guts;"
crutches which she needs to trar1sport. herBut it is no
self. we ourselves' are imbued with an al- ability to mak~
most ·magical inspiration, with a. height- prompted Bcistqi
, ened sense of caring and awareness for the nominate her· fo
plight of others."
. ship from, the
'Tm an optimist essentially," Gillis Christians and,
says.
,
:.
.
University Aw~1
· But there have been times when dis- isni';:"m1d the M
couragement prevailed.
for outstanding
"I was a recluse for a while. I was feel- grade, she won
ing a .little bitter after my last operation . brotherhood. SI:"
five y~ars ago. I had taught myself to walk retarded 15-yeai
by bracing my knees together, The operJ;ane says of
ation was si.1pposed to correct that, but in- of the faculty. tl
stead, I found that I had to use crutches all istration that G
the time, which I had uot had to before.
good-will and. b
- "So I stayed in my room. My family to achieve and ,1
used to call me- 'the ghost' when I would nary human be
com'e out. Then I discovered walking. I had GILLIS, Page Al

THE CAMBRIDGE TAB
CAMBRIDGE,. MA
W, 55,000
fqffl

SEP 22 1982

Englani!
New!icliP,

places of the sport, In
1960, the Boston YMCA
on Huntington Avenu~
held the first Scuba Instructor Institute in the
country - a forum where
persons were trained to instruct and certify others in
the sport
By the mid-60s, New. Scuba Boston-style as demonstrated by Gerald
England was the second Comeau.
most popular diving spot own.
owns 800 pools in the
in the country. Today, CalGerald Comeau, a diver United States and they
· ifornia and Florida have
for 28 years and teacher of came up with a skin diving
taken the lead, but New I Applied Physics and Phys- course outline," he says.
England still has "some of iology in the Marine SciToday, there are about
the finest diving spots in ences Program at Boston's 1 O , o O p e o p I e i n
the country and possibly Suffolk University, recalls Massachusetts trained to
_the wqdd," says John
how'rii discovered scuba dive, says Comeau, and he
· Butler, manager of . East
diving while it was in its in-· has personally instructed
, CoasLBivers,.,a,.B,ooi9in©."""-"fancy.. '~Back- m,-1'954t+ ~-more than: 2;000,i,ersons:----'-"
scuba retail shop, Diving in
went_to Crap.e's Beach one Comeau is eelebrai:ing·his
·
' the northeast' feq,i11res
day arid ( saw this kid in twentieth anniversary with
' _additional equipment bethe water standing at a 90- the Cambridge ~ A as a
cause the water is often
degree angle looking down scuba instructor. In face,
cold, but the visibiljty can
into the water I asked him he has conducted the oldbe excellent. Even in Boswhat he was doing. ae was - est continuous scuba divton Harbor ".there is a lot watching a horseshoe crab ing program taught by tbe
of diving in the outer is- purrowing in the sand. I same instructor in this
lands area and then:: ai;e a borrowed his mask and area.
k)t of wrecks. There ·are
took a look." Comeau was
Comeau, who is also a
(plenty of) rocks here and fascinated, and soon, he spear fisherman, wreck
they signify an interesting went to Sears and Roebuck · diver and underwater
bottom," says Butler, who
to buy a mask.
photographer, actually
has been diving for 17
In those days, there was prefers diving along the
years
little .skin diving equip- New England coast to the
Some other choice New
ment available to laymen, ,"divers' paradise" in the
England diving spots inso Comeau decided to Caribbean "The Caribelude Cape Ann, Gloucreate his own scuba unit
bean is so easy to dive The
cester, Nahant, anywhere
"In the 1950s, I bet there water is calm, clear and
along Cape Cod, the South weren't 500 divers in New warm. Iri New England, it's
Shore, Nantucket and MarEnglana and the equip- tough water to dive. 'It's
rilent was primitive," he cold Tile Car,ibbe:ip !]lay
JtiatVineyat.d, Skin diving
(as it was called before Self- says. Using wood, empty have many more· gaily col. Contained Underwater vegetable cans and a gar- ored fish because of the
Breathing Apparatus, or
den hose, Comeau built a temperature of the water,
scuba air tanks, were dev- uni~ which allowed him· fo 'out New Englarid has more
eloped) became familiar to breath underwater, but on- invertebrate life: crabs and
laymen after World War II
ly if someone on the sur- other kinds of shellfish It's
face pumped ~air through far more interesting up
when former Navy divers,
returning to civilian life;
the contraption Next, here," explains Comeau
brought home diving Comeau used an old fire In fact, Comeau's favorite
equipment to use on their extinguisher (cleaned out), diving spot is Rockport,
a hose from a gas mask and Massachusetts.
other odds and ends to
Chasing lobsters is an
produce a unit that al- underwater pastime of
lowed him to dive to 25 Comeau's, who says it's
feet. Comeau even created something one can only do
an underwater suit by dy- in New England. "I love
ing red woolen underwear lobsters but they're not
black In 1957, Comeau easy to grab," he exmail-ordered his first com- plains. "They're all in holes
mercial equipment.
in the rocks and they're
There was no formal in- facing fe>rwards, claws and
stru~tion in the early 50s. all."
"In those days; it was,
Those interested in tak'Scuba, what the hell is ing a certified diving
that?' We learned the hard course can drop by the
way," says Comeau
Cambridge YWCA, 7 TemRecognizing the growing_ ple st.; any Tuesday,
popularity of skin dfving in 7-10:30 pm. (491-6050)
The Boston YWCA ofthe late 50s, the YMCA, at
the national level, ·decided fers scuba diving for spe, -to introduce skin diving in- cial needs person_ s/·.
i
'Jto its cuiriculuin. "The Y _(536-7940).
·. . . -__.- .. ·.



0

7



\

used-to -call
'the ghost' whe~, I would
come out Then I discovered walkmg. I had

11a1y

GILL

THE CAMBRIDGE TAB
CAMBRIDGE. MA
W, 55,000

L - -..
'

fqffl

SEP 22 1982

Engls&1
Niewscli1>

DEC 191982

o~ ,er -g_,iant

New
ED&lmld

~"-=-~~~~~~~~~~~-'-~~~~~~~--,-~--====-------~-- ~-;2--.·,.-, , , , , ,'
I
Beating the qdds .
~lip

~

ii

,,,c,•

'

0

E~Y.RA. CREDl'I'

~

1ffo.Ik -. throu. gh Ute. fo.· llowin.g activities =1.:~

·ant of
epart-.
! first
>gram
1tioilal
if the
un'der
:man.
the
, longrill be
1ayne,
,iberal
:e~ his

- Coqtinued development of t.
university's new Learni ,
Resource, Center to impro ' ~
student retention. ·
jl
- Curriculum development W.:
meet high technology need~ jigj 1
c. lup!ng n~w majors in compu,t·,
engmeermg technology· a • •
e I e c t r o n i c- e n gi n e e r i n • ,
technology.
· ·. · . : •
- Improvement of thjfJ.
university's administrativfl.
services, and its pl~nninr.J.
capability.
.
.;j
· - Improvement of careeji
roject planning and placement services;_:,;
ant of
- Improvement of instruction~ ,
!ar in programs and advising to. edl .
ished a courage women and minoritft.
f
students to'p:r,-epare for careers. ~
1a1Fin
-.. Es ta·blishm_ ent of a facul1»i_
.

1' thth'
at development program.
, 1!'' .. .~L ·· '- Development of a prograin · •
:> 1m_- • international management ·in t · •
~
plan School of Management

1

ier Pioa.eei-,
er reviews
f scubadiving
erwater, but on- invertebrate life: crabs and
Jne on the sur- other kinds of shellfish It's
ied ,--air through far more interesting up
·aption. Next, here," explains Comeau
sed an old fire In fact, Comeau's favorite
:r (cleaned out), diving spot is Rockport,
1 a gas mask and
Massachusetts.
s and ends to
Chasing lobsters is an
1 unit that alunderwater pastime of
1 tO dive to 25
Comeau's, who says it's
au even created something one can only do
ater suit by dy- in New England "I love
olen underwear lobsters but they're not
1957, Comeau easy to grab," he ex:d his first com- plains. "They're all in holes
Jipment.
in the rocks and they're
as no formal in- facing fC>rwards, claws aiu;l
all."
1 the early 50s.
days; it was,
. Those interested in takhat tbe hell is ing a certified diving
earned the hard course can drop by the
ays Comeau. Cambridge YWCA, 7 Tem,ir the growing_ ple St., any Tuesday,
of skin dfving in 7-10,30 pm. (491-6050).
s, the YMCA, at
The Boston YWCA oft!Jevel,.decided fers scuba diving for spe:e skin diving in, · c i al needs person. s
iculum. "The.. Y (536-7940)
.
'>•..,;:.,.;c~;,_!; .• ·· ··
,-;~ .c..

.

~

r1ever ~valked Jot .fun beyond my own ·
. block. When I,began walking, . people
would call ,fo rile and cheer me on. Now I
"Tears are to be expected, laughter to . don't think I
ever go back.to that lonebe savored, thotJgh I would not trade my . ly 'existence. I don'tcry for me any more.
tears for more laughter nor· my laughter My pr1;ty~rs)iave been answered and I have
for more tears, for they are proof that I am become' stronger. When I see somebody
alive.''
·
who. looks the way I used to; \ want .t~
So wrote Lisa Gillis of West Roxbury.for make them smile, and usually I can do it.
Technj.cally Spel:!-king, the Boston Techni~ · Fitzroy Chappelle, a student from Hyde
cal School newspaper. If there is any doubt Park who has carried Gillis' books ever
about the quality of Lisa Gillis' life, a brief since they were freshmen, agrees. "That's
talk with her dispels it.

Lisa, all right. I've never seen her have ,an
The smile that warms her face and enemf''she's good to talk to." Chappelle
brown eyes draws attention away from her said that she's an all-roun(l good student,
writes very. well and is al?- officer ,in' the
crutches.
The .18-year-old senior was born with pre-engineering•program at·Tufts Univercerebral palsy and has peen fighting odds . sity.
. ..· .-., .·.
,
.
all her life. '
.
Gillis' ··aocfi:>t; Dr:, Marguerite J'feylan,
Christopher P. Lane, headmaster of says, "I have never seen Lisa whep she is
Boston Technical High School, says, "As really downhearted, despite a series of op- .
we observe her on a daily basis, going eratlons. She is a tremendous person, with i
through the corridors, utilizing the plenty of guts."
• , j'
crutches which she needs to transport herBut it is n!;>t just Gillis' courage and I
self, we ourselves' are imbued with an al- ability. to make people feel happier that j
most magical inspiration, with a height- prompted Boston Technic11I High Scho?l to. , ,
· ened sense of caring and awareness for the . nominate h~r for a top award and scholar- i
plight of others.''
. ship from. the National_ Copference of J
'Tm an optimist essentially,'· Gillis Christians and Jews. She won the SJJf£alk , t
sayBsu.·t there 'have been :times when dis- U~sity Awi\1,rdforexcellenceinjoAurnald-. i,
ism;:.:rnd the Margaret Devereaux .. waI"
,
coutageinent prevailed.
for outstanding achievement. In th~ eigptJl ';
"I was a recluse for a while. I was feel- grade, she won the Alice Casey Award for [
ing a ,little bitter after my last operation . brotherhood. She also tutors a moder:ately
five y~ars ago. I had taught myself to walk retarded 15-year-old cousin.
~1
by bracing my knee13 together, The operL'ai:i,e says of Gillis: "It is. the consensus
1
ation was supposed to correct that, but in- of the faculty:, the students and the a~m~n- '
stead, I found that I had to use crutches all istration that GHlis epitomizes the spirit,of
the time, which I had not had to before.
, good-Wil! an(br?therh?Cd. that we, st:rrv~
·iso I stayed in my room. My family to achieve andJoster. Lisa 1s an extraortli· '
used to call me- 'the ghost' when_I would , nary human being." \
come out. Then I discovered walking. I had GILLIS, Page A18
\(,
By Phylli~ Coons
Globe Staff



will

THE CAMBRIDGE TAB
CAMBRIDGE1 MA
W, 55,000

SEP 22 1982

('qew

Englanil
Newsclii>

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throu~~~he following activities :1,·
_ Continued development of .t.
.
', ·t 's new Learni , '

Unl vers1 Y
to 1mpro :i11

Resource· Cen t er
t
~
1 student retention. development ..~
·
_ Curriculum
'!I"J
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needs J8
e meet high tech~O ogr
t,·
1
:r eluding new mtJor; ~ 1;;~p~ •
1. engineerin~ eec n ng in e er in· •
e 1e ctr on 1 C
g- technology·
. t Of t h .
>e
- Im p r o Ve m en
t 1 fj,
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tran .vnrJ."
le , university's d adminis1an 1
.
· ·
1·ts p
·al services. an
·
•• •
1is capability....
. t of caree!
_ Improvemen
. . ~.
~ct
lanriing and placeme_nt serv1~esj1.
of P - Improvement of -~stru~:o:~
in programs anc:J. adv1stgminoriti'J. ..
id a courage women an
.
;•n
students to p.t;'ep~re for careers. f.,:,
i; in
- Establishment of a facultp.
:hat development program.
i
.~
the
- Development of a progr~m tlf.
im:- • international management m t ~·:
lan School of Management
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Gillis wants to go to a conservatory and train
as a musical therapist. She has never learned to
read music, but she has written songs for gui·
tar, piano and organ. Sometimes Sh h bee a
she writes
poem, arid the music comes to her. e as
n
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10 and has used
p aymg !Y ear smce s e was .·
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music to work with the elderly.
.1
"Now I think it's time that I learned to read
music,'' says Gillis, who studied singing last
year in Brookline With Hanni Myers.
"Lisa has a good soprano voice," says Myers.
..She is a reliable student and a very mature
person, who knows how to listen. I should think
that musical tht';,r_apy would be a very good career for her. She's a·most unusual person."

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Jr reviews
f scubadiving
.t

. THE CAMBRIDGE TAR
CAMBRIDGE. MA
W, 55,000

Bostoa.~style as detnoa.strated by Gerald

~

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~d Comeau, a diver
years and teacher of
:1 Physics and Physi11 the Marine Sci·
lrogram at Boston's
. University, recalls
~-discovered scuba
while it_was i11_jts in"·

owns 800 pools in the
United States and they
came up with a. skin diving
course outline," he says.
Today, there are about
10,00 0- p eo P le in
Massachusetts trained to
dive, says Comeau,and he
. has. Re.~s<ln~Iy,,:'i~tJ1Icted

~··

SEP 2 2 1982

;-•i

the~~::tit~~~e~h~~:i~~~~
"To Martin Luther King
You're still here,
You never left.
You're.still here,
· ·
·
·
.In the l_i(lart of every free man,
..
Every c;treamer, everyone
·1
.. ,.
·
. An·d. anyone m me.
Iloved what you stood for,
You cha'.p.ged the world:
It ch~ngec},yt,>u.
.
.
The teaf;;;,you cried were µot in v~in.
1
The 1paiy. you felt is, still the same'.
Laughter will come one day,
Peace it
be.
I know, ~ause.,. Martin,
·
You're'still here, in me."

---.
'
,ter Pioneer
.

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Eng,l.an£1
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SEP 3
""''~.'
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'•.

1982

New
Englund
News.r:lip

WOBURN/PEOPLE
.

By WILi.JAM F. s¢µ\T AN

, Llons Club, Pre&ident PHIL!~ McGANN of Rock Street,·
, cmnounced this week that plans. are well underway for ,the- '
· i$lllual :aalloween Parade and festival, The parade is sch_eduled
ioiSunday afternoon, Oct. 3l, and details will be annqunced by
··tile respective committees in the days and weeks to come ...
,NANCY MATZA Director of Stude:,;it Services at Associated
· Technical Institute, West-Cummings Park, has·been appointed
to the public relations committee of NA'ITS, the National
. ·Associatiog, of Trade and '.!,'echnical Schools, Washington, ff£.
'. Her husband- BRIAN MATZA directs the ·successful East
('.Woburn education. faciUty, specializing .in eiectronics,, ,
p digital/coµiput~r, refrigeration -and air co~ditioiling classes.
i ',. ANN.MARIE NEWSHAM and MARY JO CONWAY both of
, .• Wo~urn' were 'recipients' of Friendly Ice 'bream company
;; ,Traditions of Excellence Awards in recognitioti of high
, achievement in'aIIphases of customer service. Ann,Marie is.
: Wit;tvthe 60 Bed,ford 'Roaq, Lexfogton, outlet, while Mary Jo is
: .~mployed atFrtendly's 376 Cambridge R'.oad, Woburn, store ...
'. EDWARD C. SlilNNICK of 5 -Jnnifou Road was recently· intJmned vice: ptesiqent 9f the North Life Member . Club of
\,l'elephon~ Pioneers. Mr. Shinnick re~ently retired from New:.
,'_'E,ngland~Teleph,one after many years service. He is the former ·
:/chairman of the Woburn Golf and Ski Authority, and has been
f>active.inWoburnaffairsformanyyears.
,
'. . ·lV[arineReserveSgt. TYLERC. GATELY son of JEROME i;:'.
-icATHLE:EN T. GATELY of 37 Bruno Terrace recently
participated in exercise '"Phantom Fox" at the Marine' Air',
Station Cherry Point, N.c. He is a memt>er o{ Headquarters and
Maintenance ,Squadro; 41, . Andrews, Air Force _ Base,
"W~hiri.gton ... CHRISTINE VIEZENS of'Woburn, a stu,dentat
c- S ~ University, atten~ed the \Yashington Center for
, Learniilg Alternatives in the slimmer '82 intern,,sbip program in
the:nation's'cai:)ital, . .
. . . ' ROBERT.F, PROKOP, Jr.·son of ROBERT F. and JOANNE·' -· 1¥(. 'P~O~QP ·of-.~~ Montvale Road, East. Woburn; recently
received· pi;aetical, work in. military leadership in the, Amry .
ROTC A4vanced Camp at,Fort Bragg, N; C. Prokop is a student _

'· and

'

·--:"'"';

· at the University of Lowell .-.. Pvt. CHARLES M. WEBBER son
ofIRVING.W. and ADA.WEBBER of'20 Richardson St., has
completed, one station unit trainil}g at the Army Infantry
,School, Fort Bem,rtng, Ga, The program lasted 12 weeks. ,
. .
· Afrman MICHAEL B. WASI,IISKO , son · o~ · ARLENE · H. ·
WASIDSKO of 210 Westgate Drive has graduated from the U.S.
Air For.ce aircraft maintenance specialist .course at Chanute
Air Force Base, UL He will now,.serve at Pope Air Base, N.c; :
with the 317th fieldmainteQance squadron ... PAUL DOWNEY,
Pr~sideµt of ~hoate-Symmes Health Services, attended the
American· Hospital Association Convention in Atlanta, Ga,,
recently. The th.eme of this year's conclave was "takipg charge
oftomorrow." .
'
'
'
.
Marine amce Cpl. ARTHUR J'. SPICER son of Mr. and Mrs;
ROBERT J. SPICER of 17 App Court, has· departed on a
deployment to Marine Air Station, Futenrha on Okinawa. He i~'
a member of the Marine m~avy Helicopter Squadron 361, based
at Tustin, qalif,.,; Airman TODDL. ANDRE, son of LEER. and
RENEE L. ANDRE of 13 Mountain-St. has graduated from the
- U,S. Air Force aircraft maintenance training course at Shep- 1
. pard Air Base, Texas. He has been assigned to McClellan Air'
B~e, Calif., with tQe 43-lst Test and Evaluation Squadron.
MARGARETBASTOLLA, a graduate of Woburn High School
has' completed the E:i:cecutive secretarial progrrun with, Legal
Specialization at Burd~tt, Bost~n. Sh~ is cur:reµtly employed as
a legal secretary: with Craig and Macauley, Boston .. ,
MICHELE ALDRICH of 29 Liberty Ave:, daughter of JOSEPH
and RITA ALDRICH has completed the travel training,
program of the William Boyd Career School in Pittsburg, Pa.,
and is now employe<;l with Fqx Travel in Waltham. She,is a ,
graduate of Wol)urn High School.
·
JOHN H. BARRY'of Woburn has been named to the Dean's
List for the. recent semester at Salem State College~ .. Recent
Fire , Department retirees · Clµef Robeft E. Peary · and
Firefighter VVilliam Langill, wiH be guests of' honor at the annual ~~tof theWoburn,@'efighters Association Sept.17 at
the Elks Home., Fishing is the pastime for both retiree~, Peary
mostly on the ~bores of Horn Pond while Langill ~~s-to th~ far
north hills of ~ew Hampshire near the Canadian border.

~

BOSTON SUN.DAr GLOBE
BOSTON, MA

s.

600,339

DAJ1YEVENING REM

i::y MA
~~«tl

ftew

DEC 1 9 1982

E:agland

N~J?

ksl;iop
,
.cir TV commercials
1

BOSJ'Otf Iii.OBI
BOSTON. ML

l :~ ald R. SimpSO~~
~
Don
171982

JIIIU~::

ex-..1 schoo··1 d.e·an
aw

~


B ·!La~ra White
of the equipment. Sinc;e Proposition i112',

S ciaj to The Globe
•. many local schools have ha9 to cut out :
, ffel.~vision commercials signal a snack- such. programs as s~eech ~nd. drama I
.MEREDITH, NH
b ak"''dash to the kitchen for some TV classes /and video equipment training," I
Road, former de .• - Donal~ R.. Simpson, Dale
e~~- But a growing number of adults said EsteUe Davids. director of The Worlc~ I · · dted suddenly
Suffolk University Law School,
children. ranging in age from 8 to 50 shop. .
·.
·
·
.
,
dence R I He w y-at Rhode Island Hospffal Provirs old, hope television will be their meal
. "The school greu: ~ht of a need. to. pro(Setc~ell). Simpson.as the husband of Mrs. Deborah
et.a.s a full- or part-time career, as a v1dt! professiona.l trammg toJocal talent as \. .. . Born. in Swamp.scott,
ping stone into acting or some other more TV commercials;: movies and inqus- ; , he was the son of the lat
5
a aas of broadcast or as a way to make trial films werr pro~uced .here. Flft~n , · \ Frank L. Simpson, also!
c: q.tacts to expand careers in totally differ,- years ag.o. the.re -~.as .only one pr.od~ctwn f~ ,"_former d.ean at Suffolk
e. 1field~. . , .
,_ . .
·
· com:p~ny in fl?ston, ~ow there are about :,
and Mabel (White) Sim:
:Courses aimed spedffcai1y at,, train(hg 35. Eocal advertising age_ncies and many of l; • Pson.
dple for on-camera t~levision comfuer-· the major Boston-ha~. companies are us- if i . • A colonel in the
1
cl ~ work'are.h6t pa.rt of the regular cur- inglocaltalent," conttm.ied Davids.
foJ7.._m_er Army Air Corps
ri · !um in communication departments at An i~crease ~ usin&local ~lent
~ World War Il, Mr.
rst:1n• College, Boston and S\lffo.lk Unk • ·. Ann Finucane, vice president and. exfolk P~n taughtlaw at Sufi ties.. Emerson and Suffolk t•do offer eputive producer of Hill Holiday Connors
1~5-55. He reer
· !urses in TV news reporting and Cosmopulos, and. Mary Moore, creative diadvis toactive ~uty as an
brmn:lea:sting, but both require some pre- rector, at Humphrey J3rowning and Macvocater
the Judge advw=ournalism ,eourses;
·· ·
' Dougall _; boJh major :advertising agencies
four eat thebPenta:gon for
~me 180 adults and 360 children have in Boston _ agree there has been some inin ~ears, efore resumP~ $255 and $355, respectively, to attend crease in using local talent. Boston clients,
.PO~t at the law
!!Wtt-week training sessi6ns at The Work- su,ch as the First National Bank. Gillette,
nanied •d w e!e he was
. ..
New England Olds, the Massachusetts Lothad nior ean m 196,t He .
Donald Simpsoa
·s~p for Television at 392 Boylston st.
~n a simulated television studio, stu- tery and Fayva Shc;ies,,they say, like local·
Pierce
reSchoocently.!,)een_a professor of law at Franklin·.
d~ts learn to walk, talk. smile, and sound ~cenes and personnel; it's also cost-effecs
. this Ma · w
l m Concord, and upon bis retire
·
amJ look enthusiastic, yet sincere. They tive compared to filming and traveling to
bfthe%:!1awardedanhonorarydoctoroflawdement /
n~t be believable and know how to make New ~ork or Los An~eles. But those cities
·
A ca ·
·.
,
.
gree
TV ,capi,era capture a naturalness that are still a mecca for a(ivertising. .
-i'eceiv:f /uate of ~ynn Classical ffigh, Class of 1 ..
h~: s sel.l \1.l
pytliing from shaving cr.,eam to . Children are divid,ed into three classes.. . : 192! and bachelors degree_from DartmoUth Coll~'~
t ~- new:est 1
widget.
ages B to 11, 12 and 13, and 14 to 18. They
. Bosfi>n U: .'!as _graduated mfign~ cum laude · fromge ID.
§:. he, :Workshop opened four years ago
receive 16 hours ti"airl,ing over eig~t weeks :·; he taught'1:Versity School of Law in 1932. Before the the
a':" is .Heep.sect by the Massachusetts De- with a different instructor for each class. .1 an assistan:w: Northeastern University and sert/;_ar
P:. merit Education. .
.
Instructors .come frol)'l Harvard, Emerson
i the aUthor -~ ,~ey ge~eral for Massachusetts. He. w!s
0
We're :the only school in Boston Ii- ,.and Sirtimqns and are,ptrformers as well_ ,1 Tenant."
assacbusetts Law of Landlord'
c
d to train children to perform in tele- as educators,
./' \ \
f
He was
.
·
vi n ~omrtier1:ials and to work with some TELEVISION, Page AH}
!Masons,,Marbfehi;:;iber of the Wayfarers Lodge, of
3
.......- . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - , _ . , , ; ; ; : . . . c a n Bar Associatiom. and the Massachusetts and Ameri0



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C_Services will :be private.

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..• ,T~LEVISION
·• •
_pontmued from Pag~l7
.• · t:feacMng children is more
· ·~O~ted than adults. Children
~i,-e more self-conscious until they
becl;>.me · accustomed to their surro4n.dings. They must learn to be
~ware of every facial expression
andc:JJ~W to control them," said Da· v_ids, and they must be taught to
geL.into character, she said; "We
use•mime as an early class. Once
. theY.'._gvercome that road block,
<.ttiey lose the giggles and fear.''
· ·· MQst of the children enrolled in
.; , the \~orkshops have some exper-

............... ..

ience. SOn1~ have ha~·dance and
music lessqn:s or performed in
school plays; others have done
some. modeling as early as second
and ~hird grade. But it takes some
training to sell pearmt butter or cereal on TV..
"Charisma,. a special quality
.that just stands out. is necessary.
We can train children and adults
how to stand, move, talk to the
camera and project sincerity. But
there's always that e~tra something that so111e people have and
· i. ,
·

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others don't," said Davids.
Every chilcf has it in the eyes of
his parents, but casting directors
and even visitors to the workshop
sessions ca.n see how so.)lle children
nat!-lraily seduce the camera and
outdistance even prettier youngsters.
"I love to see myself <;;n the,video
ma~hine," said Christine Dilks, 9,
of Somerville. "I want to do commercials and then _go into acting." ,
Christine and her brother Stephen, 8, both attend The Workshop. Their mother, Frances, a
nurse and single parent. admits
the double tuition put her own
0





. hopes of going to graduate school
on the back burner.
. "Christine's always been.inter¢stediil acting and television. She
r,trote a play in the second grade.
She'd always asked to take a class
like this. With tne' change in the
family, it seemed like a good time.
Stephen's close to Christine. He
wanted to go too, he's into hockey
and thought .school for commercials was gfrls' stuff, until we
showed him the Patriots and Bru- -

torjn_er Army· A.Jr· Coq,s·
d ~ World War II, Mr.
Sunpson taught law at Suffolk from 1945-55. He re~ed to active duty as an
adVISer to the judge advocat«~ at the Pentagon for
four years, before resuming his post at the law
school, where he was
named dean in 1964. He ._
Dopald Sknpson .
~d mo~ recently .been a professor of law at Franklin
-•~rce . · . w School in Concord, and upon his retirement
this May was awarded an honorary doctor of law degree 1
by the school
·
·
. ,
. ~ graduate of Lynn Classical High Class of 1924· he ·
-received a bachelor's degree from Dartmouth Colleg~ in,
1929• and .'!as ?aduated m·jl.gnjl. cum laude' from the
Boston Umvers1ty School of Law in 1932. Before the war
he ta~t law at Northeastern University and serted as
assistant a~!"°ey ge~eralJor Massachusetts. He was.
Te~!~or of Massachusetts Law 'of Landlord and

f:

1

He was a member of the Wayfarers ·Lodg
l
Masons,:Marbl~h!ad, and the Massachusetts and
can Bar Associations.
\ 1966_ms ~st wi(e, Vir.·ginia (Dolphin) Sim1>son, died m
..

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: .

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OAJlY EVENINI mM

LYNN, MA
D ,32,4-W .·
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JUti171982
others don't," said Davids.
Every child.has it in the eyes of
his parents, but casting directors
and . and even visitors to the workshop
d in sessions can see how sqme children
iorie naturally seduce the camera and
cond outdistance even prettier young.ome sters. '
1r ce"I love to see myself on the video
machine," said Christine Dilks, 9,
1lity of Somerville. "I want to do com.ary. mercials and then go into acting."
lults · Christine and her brother Stethe phen, 8, both attend The WorkBut shop. Their mother, Frances, a
>me- nurse and single parent. admits
and the double tuition put her own .

BOSTm Gl.OBE

QOSIQN.ML

o..wm

ins doing TV commercials," sai.d
An eight-week course doesn't
Dilk~'s. mother of four..
·· turn students into professionals.
Davids, however, says about one. "Christine's always been. interLastmonth, Stephen auditioned third of her students, children and
ested in acting arid television. She , for a hot dog commercial. "He was adul~ are doing some' work in the
}\'iote a play in the second grade. nervous before, but afterwards, he field.
She'd always asked to take a class said he did a good job. We're wait''.It's not all on camera, doing
ge( cqm- TV commercials. Some children are
l.ike this. With the' change in ·the ing to hear. If the kids
family. it seemed like a good time. mercial assignments, that money better at modeling for both photogStephen's close to Christine. He can help with their college· educa- raphy and runway work. For the
wanted to go too, he's into hockey tion. If not. I have noticed that they adults, there's work in radio comand thought sch.ool for commer- seem more confident in themselves. mercials, voice-overs for TV, indus~
cials was gfrls' stuff, until we He speaks right up now," said his trial film work, both audio and vishowed him the Patriots and Bru-,.. mother.
sual," she said.

hopes of going to graduate school
on the back burner. ·

Iot~ef filmy Air Co~s
diiruig World War II, Mr.
Simpson taught law at Suffolk from 1945-55. He returned to active duty as an
adviser to the judge advocate at the Pentagon for
four years, before resuming hi,s post at the law
school, where he was
named dean in 1964; He
Donald SimJJSOD
~d more recently _been a professor of law at Franklin
P1~ce .Law School in Concord, and upon his retirement
this May was awarded an honorary doctor of law degree 1
by the school.
·
. !a- graduate of Lynn Classical High, Class of 1924; be
Nee1ved a bachelor's degree from Dartmouth College in.
1929, and y,as graduated magna cum laude' from the
BostQn Umversity School of Law in 1932. Before the ~ar
he ta~t law.at Northeastern University and serted as
, · UI: assistant attorney ge~eral for Massachusetts. He was.
the author of "Massachusetts Law of Landford' and
·
\
Tenant."
He was a member of the Wayfarers Lodge, of
Masons, Marblehead, and the Massachusetts and American Bar Associations.
His first wi(e, Virginia (Dolphin) Simpson, died. .in .
. ..
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BELMONT (AP) - Stephen P. Mugar, founder '
'<>fthe,Star Market supermarket chain and a philanthropist who donated to many New England
colleges, died Saturday. He was 81.
Born in Armenia in 1901, he came to the United
States .with his family five years later.
In 1916, his father bought a small grocery store,
the Star Market, in Watertown, and ran it with his
son and thre.e daughters. The store was the start of
w~at was to ;become one of the largest supermarket chains in New England with more than 8,000
employees and approximately 2/:i stores.
' In 1~60, Mugar bought the Brigham's Ice
Creaqi c~a~, andin 1964, he merged those and
the then,36 Still' ~arkets with The Jewel Tea Co
Inc. ofChicag9.·He continued as chairman of the
board of$tar until 1969, when he retired after 50
ye;ll'.s·with the markets.
· He a.h!Q'became one of the largest private owner-developers of shopping centers in the nation
:with tji(>l'~"thIUr 4 million square., feet:.of.r.et~il
space, · including interests in malls in Masisachusetts .and Rhode Island.
.
.While going fo high school, Mugar worked parttime at his father's store, went to classes nights at
the Bentley School. of Accounting and Finance,
and sold brushes door-to-doorfor the Fuller Brush
Co.,
When his f!lther died in an automobile accident
'in 1923, Mugar took full responsibility for the
store(working 12 to 17 hours a day. He opened a
second store in N e'wton in 1932 and a third store in
Wellesley in 1937. '
·
1
During the Depression,he advertised in a newspaper qeclarjng his faith in the United States and
announcing that-·during the 1932 hank holiday, ~
Starwowd·extendcredit to customers and would [
cash their checks.
.
i ia·
When-the 1938 hurricane knocked out electric-;
ity in the Bostop area:, he had Star employe.es )
deliver, blocks of dry ·ice to hundreds of homes
where children and elderly lived to preserve their
food.
I
Jn·l.960, he s't.udied marketing t~chniques·and/
food distn.'bution. in the Soviet Union on behalf of
the U.S. State Department.
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founder of .Star
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OCT 1 71982

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lanth~plSt who donated to .many New England
colleges, died Saturday. He was 81.
.no111 i11Armenia in 190!, he came to the United
States with his family five years later.
Ip. 1916, his father bought a small grocery store, 1
,the StarMarket, in Watertown, and ran it with his :
· son andthre.e daughters. The store was the start of ;
wl].at, was, ~o :become one' of the largest supermarket chains in New England with more than 8;000
e~ploy~es t;tnd approximately 21:i stores.
;; In 1960, Mugar bought the Brigham's Ice /
Crea:qi cp.11~1 and in 1964, he. merged those and i
thethe.1.1,~6 ~t~ ~arke~s with The ~ewel Tea Co i
Ille. of Chicag9. ·He continued as chairman of the
board of$tar until 1969, when he retired after 50 /
ye!ll'.s ·with the markets.
..
1
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.
,~r7dev:elopers of; shopping centers in the. nation
:with rpi>rlnh"a-n 4· million-square,.feeQCJ".et¥1,
.Space,· including interests in malls in Mas;sac.husetts ,and Rhode Island.
..
, , While going to high school, Mugar worked partti:me at his father's store, went to classes nights at
.the Bimtley School. of Accounting and Fiqance,
and sold brushes door-to-door,for the Fuller Brush
:Co.. ,
.
.
When his father died in an automobile accident
in 1923, Mugar took full responsibility for the
store,iwprking 1~ to17 hours a day. He opened a
second ~tore in Newton in 1932 and a third store in
Wellesl~yin 1937. '
.
1
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...
..
announcing that,during the 1932 bank holiday,[. ~
,S~r would extend credit to customers and would &.
cash their checks.
>c
When·the 1938 hurricane knocked out electricity 'in tl,le .Bostoti area., he had Star employe.es
deliver, blocks of dry ice to hundreds of homes
where children.and elderly lived to preserve their
food.
.,
Iti 1_960;' he stµdied marketing t~chniques ·and
foQd distribution in the Soviet Union on behalf of
the U.S. State Department.
JUs donatfons to colleges included the Mugar
Memorial Libra'.\')' at Boston University. He also
· gave to Northeastern University, Colby-Sawyer
Col~ege, Suffolk TJniyersity, Tufts University,
Boston College, Brandeis'"trniversity, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Haigazian
College in Beirut, Lebanon.
He also contributed to many Armenian organizations and. churches.
H~ was trustee of a n~mber of colleges and had
r,eceived several honorary d~gree~. PresidentLyn<lon B. Johnson presented him with the Democracy in Action Award, one of a number ofawards and
citations he received.
He is iiurvived by his wife, two children, 1three
gra,ndchildren;·asister, two nieces an.d a ~ephew.
The faini.ly asked that instead of flowers,. donations be made to the Watertown Boys Club and the
Armenian Assembly.

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WAL1HAM, MA.

Mtrf'ORll DAILY Nf.WS
.MILFORD, MA.

D. 15,360

». 13.413i

OCT 181982 OCT 18 1982
,---;.

----

New
England;

MAY9

Newsclip

New

1982

~gland

.Stephen P. M ugar, was~~: r
·founder of Star Markets: Rev. Dr.Mabel Sahaki~ll,
·

-

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1

BOSTON (UPI) - A private
funeral service-was scheduled today for philanth-ropistbusinessman Stephen P. _Mugar,
an Armenian · immigrarit who
transformed the family grocery
store into a chain of 62 supermarkets.
Mugar, the founder of the Star
Market chains and a nationally
known real estate developer, died
Saturday at age 81 after a brief illness. .
''
He donated millions of dollars to
New E;ngland colleges and
charities in the Greater Boston
area. (A Boston University
library bears his name.)
When asked why he gave so,
much money away, Mugar said,
"I can't explain that. I get great
pleasure from it.' What would my
ability and .wealth prove if I did
nothing with it?"
"Money should be considered a
public trust," he said.
In 1966, the late President Lyndon B. Johnson presented Mugar
with the Democracy in Action
award.
Mugar immigrated to America
with his Armenian parents in 1906
and his father opened a small

"

~~;:~

pas.tor·, love was her theme

:or;a~:J:~~d l~hey~!i~;
later. Mugar took over the store '.
after his · father's death arid ;
''Absolutely and above all else,
gradually built it into a chain of 62 : I rm a woman," Rev. Dr. Mabel
1
stores with annual sales of about : · (Lewis) ;.si:\.hakian once told a re.:
$1 billion.
porter.'"l'm feminine , .. " Thus a
The chain, 80 Brigham's~ ice· central theme of her ministry cream stores and five other shops
love - may have come to her quite
were later merged into the billion- ~• naturally and stamped her life.
dollar Chicago~based firm, TheRev. Sahakil'l.n, 61, died Friday
Jewel Tea Co,, of which Mugar, after a long illness in her home at
was a major stockholder.
;',. Eisenhower circle, Wellesley. She
Mugar, who lived in surburba~ · had been the pastor since 1978 of
the Riverdale Congregational
Belmont, was a founder of Th~
Hundred Club, which aids Church in Dedham.
. The first woman accepted, in
families of policemen and firemflg.'
killed in the line of duty. . .
•;;· 1944 by a special vote of the faculty
He donated an art building ali' at Boston University, to earn a deColby Sawyer College ll1 New !-,on.;. gree in Sacred Theology - which don, N.H., the library at Bosto_n she earned in 1947 - she was also I>R. MABEL SAHAK{AN
University and the Life Scie~ce~ : the first woman minister in the
Building at Northeastern Umv~.~;.. I Massachusetts .Dau hters of the
sitr ·. and helped _fund_ other f'liil"Fe:-:":f:Loniv~e;"liiiaisli1mmnpn'ort.j:j'anii'tt'Tror:ailrpn.eoFSt···~pi1ie•,-crettrt,s,rcr:rraicrni'l::rt'"'.ba:mhmrtrrbUllding~ at T~ts Umvers1ty~.;,.. ~ from babyhood right along through Hitchcock Medical Center, Han
folk Umv~rs1ty, Massaclmse~t§ ~ every phase of life.
over, N.H., wqo plans to wed .SteIn"ffltute of Techn?logy;, B?stop ~
"And too Illany people die, they phen Orme Nunn, an assistant at~
Colleg~ and Br~mde1s Umv~r1st~··· . [:' actµally die frolll la_tk of it - in par- torney general of Tennessee. !. ,
H~ 1s survivt:d by his wife o, ~ic~Iar,ct,he ~lqetjf,~pq,J~el they
Mrs. Sahakian actuated
~ar1on, son David, who runs the .1 · ar-e unwanted~ _
µseless·2rrot needed
family enterprises and WNEV-T¥ by-anyone or anything~· th~y haye
in Boston, and a daughter) no will to live."
,
Carolyn.
•/J
Rev. Sahakian saw love, or the
_
__,..-J~ lack of it, as the main cause of-de:u.__ linquency, drug addition, strain \
-' and tensions that can ruin marfC riages and careers. She saw love as

i

SfCJte-CD pl0-11rl0r: Nuke attack 'survivable'
BOSTON <AP> - Even i~ _.an
estimated 500,000 to one mdhon
people died in an all-out nuclear attack on Ma~~achusetts, a state Civil
Defen~e off1~~al calls such an assault
"sµrv1vable:
. "It's survivable," Douglas Forbes,
director I Of planning for the
Massachusetts Civil Defense agency,
said Monday about an attack. "The
survivors wouldn't like what they
come outto. It would be grim."
He estima,ted that many p~ople
would die in st1ch an attack even If tile
state's "minimal" civil defe,nse
worked to maxiinum efficiency.
He ~id not explain how he ~rrived
at his -de.a th toll estu!(ate.
Massachusetts has a population of
about 5. 7mnlion. _
Forbes estimated_ the U.S. death
toll in a nuclear war would be 40 to 50
million __ people, .even if pl~ns to
protect people through relocat.1on and
~-;-..:,

.

_.,...!.,;.,

::..

commu,nity shelters worked. . ·- · · plans; also would buy time (or
Forbes called nuclear war diplomacy ·while saving millions of
"probably the least li~ely thing that lives
·
· ·
·
will ever happen" but said having a ·
do nothing, whife we•fe waiting
plan to protect people w~s a deterent for the weapons to go away, just
tonuclearwar.
.. .·
doesn't make sense," he told the
Forbes said about 3 cents per students
person ill federal 'm~,ney is Spent in 1.

Massachusetts on nuclear protection.,·
_____
Hedisclosednototalamount.
----;'The program that we have is
certainly minimal," he said. "When
· we tal.k about spending 3 cents per
person in the state, I think that's
ridiculous."
Forbes spoke to about 25 people,
mostly students,_ at Suffolk Univ~r-sity'§..SCience Week &ffograrn oii1he
consequences of nuclear war.
1982
Forbes said that nuclear protection
plans that included relocataijon from
•·risk" areas" deterred nuclear war
by eliminating any s.>".~t ,strategic .
advantage in los~ of li_(e. l.J!e· ~aid the

· .F!)rbes. said

federal government
reviews ID· tl'le 1970s roughly confirmed Soviet claims they could
protect. 90. perc~nt or more of their
_populatIQn, while . the U.s.. w~uld
suffer 50 percent ID casualties ID a
nuclear war.

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ruru :,MUU 1H HERALD
PORTSMOUTH, NH.
D. 18.000

APR 6

1982

New

England,
~Mtltt

8'111>81111!1111' l!l&Ma<W~'Cll:9

WAllHAM, MA.
D. 15,360

Mll.f'ORll DAILY Nm
.MILFORD, MA.

BOS10N . . . .

f.DB·

». 13.41a

OCT 181982 OCT 18 1982

New
Englarut
Newsclip

"

New

1982

Ji;ngland

Newsclip

-----

..
Massachusetts Ci 45
said Monday abo1
survivors wouldn 48
.-n '/
comeoutto. It would grim."
He estimated that many people
would die in such an attack even if tile
state's "minimal" civil defe,nse
worked to maximum efficiency.
He did not explain how he arrived
at his de.a th toll estimate.
Massachusetts has a population of
about 5.7 mttlion.
Forbes estimated the U.S. death
toll in a nuclear war would be 40 to 50
million peocle, even if _plans to
Pf~~ect peop e through relocation and
--- "'· · "'

tiiil "Realms of Philosop.hy" \~,hi~h

.. ~-.---~lXtIO~
w..-- cU 11 mtal amount.
,
'The program that we have il
certainly minimal," he said. "Whe1
. we talk about spending 3 cents I
person in the state, I think thffi
ridiculous."
.
.
Forbes spoke to about 25 people
mostly students,. at Suffolk Univ~rs.
sity's ,Science Week iffogram ofilhE
consequences of nuclear war.
,
Forbes said that nuclear protectio~
plans that included relocatat~on from
"risk'.' ~rea~" deterred !)Uclear war
by ehmmatmg any S0".~t ·Strategic
advantage in los,s of li{e.:}!e ~aid the'
~
· ·

went into its third edition in 1980
and "John Locke."
Mrs: Sahakian made headlines
·
h
f ·
• d
_in t_h~ 1_96Os w en: a ter he_r or inati~m . m the Umted .Church of
~hnst m _1953,_ she begf.n _attractmgattentmp with her_m~mstry:
S~e o~ce told a ?lobe m;t~rviewer her fITst choice of sermon
themes was love· and the second,
The Lord's Prayer. "So .many say
it, but have no real comprehension
_as to its meaning. so I urge them·to
pray from the heart and with the
full understanding of the words
they are directing to Heaven."
And on Love, she said: "Love is

__ _,_

.._, .... ..,'-'

YYUO

.Gll.

the Riverdale Church in Dedham.
where she started as an assoc1ate
minister in 1953. She served the
South Congregational Church in
B · t
f
1968
·ttl 19·69
ram ree rom
un • . ;
the First Congregational Ch~rch in
Norwood, 1972 aQd 1973, and the
Riverdale Church as pastor since
1978. Among the many personal
pastoral experiences ~he enjoyecl
was the privilege of performing the
marriage ceremony in Jurie. 1979
between her daughter, Dr. Barbara
Jacquelyn, and D. Trevor Robbins
. of Cambridge Uniyersity, England.
, And, Rev. Sahakian _had been
looki1_1g forward to officiating at the
marnage of her second daughter

·--~~~:~b~f1~ ?~p2tt~ntlla11~§~~; ,~~;;;;e~~-[i~:~!;/:1~~~~~~ ·- ~
from babyhood right along through Hitchcock Medical Center, Han1

every phase of life.
"And too ~any people die, they
actually die fro.m la.ck of it - in par. ticular. the e;lq:etjy ,~l:194~1 they
are unwanted,, u,s~Je~~;'1:1t1i;"rn;eded
by·anyone or anything..:. they have
no will to live."
·
Rev. Sahakian saw love, or thelack of it, as the main cause ofdelinquency, drug addition, strain
and tensions that can ruin marriages and careers. She saw love as
a requirement for one's relationship with neighbors, business associates, his country and, the
world. "If this love were fostered,
there would be love between ·nations'." she was quoted as saying in
1964.

.

over, N.H .. wl.Jo plans to wed Stephen Orme Nunn, an assistant at~
torney general of Tennessee. '. . ••· ;
. Mrs. Sahakian. graduated (r9~,
Gordon College, YJenhaiµ(,h~lg'"it+f::'~
honorary doctorate from €urry00:il~M
lege, Milton and also had. received
the Hester Ann Beebe Fellowship
from Boston University. For many
years she had been a member of th
Boston Authors Club and of the
American Philosophical Assn. She
also was head of the American
Cancer Society drive in Dedham in
1964-65.

_.

.

·

She had been senior state chap" .
lain of the Children of the Ameri~
can Revolutio1_1 (Massachi:isetts)
. a~d was listed m the Marquis edi~
""' -tion of the Who's Who in .A.:merica:
Who's Who in the World and '
Who's Who of American Women. ·
She traced her ancestry to two
signers of the Declaration of Independence, John Read of Delaware
and John Ross of Pennsylvania
where she was a native of West
Newton, Betsy Ross and Gen. William Thompson of the Revolutionary War period.
Besides her husband and two
daughters, she leaves two sons,
James William Sahakian of Watertown, assistant district attorneyof
Middlesex Country and Richard
Lewis Sahakian. of Natick, assistant vice president of Winthrop Financial in Boston: her father. Paul
Tyson Lewis of Cairo, Ga., and a
brother, James N. Sample of Corinellsvile, Penn.
Burial in Knollwood Park, Can··
ton, is planned.
- WIL9AM P. C()UGHLIN

fi,teW

li','Dgia,..4

Ci.e~sclit

-.- ~even Days To Go
Edited by/.

MONDAY
A tough commute

W

hen job prospects In the U.S.
are this bleak. working In
France Is an appealing alternative .,,..
at least you can loaf at a cafe near the
Seine instead of on a bench In the
Boston Common. Find out what
Judith Frommer of Harvard University has to say about the t?plc in her
lecture. "Working In France: Fact,
Fiction, and "F4UUC Pas!"
{The lecture is at 3:30 p.m. tn the
Special Functions Room at Simmons College. 300 The Fenway. It ls
free.} .
-

W

It'll be jun!

e can shut our eyes. but it
won't go away & the prospect ot a nuclear war is too close to
reality for comfort. which ls why ~flolk Unfye15it¥, Is dedicating Its
""Science Week to a program enWled.
"Considering the Consequences of
Nuclear War... The program opens today with a talk by Douglas Forbes of
the Mass. Civil Defense Agency about
nuclear protection for Massachusetts.
(The lecture is at 1 p.m tn Room 25

B

ee bop and boogie are on the
. agenda tonight at Brookllne's
Tam o· Shanter, when rock groups
Natural Boogie and The Visitors strut
lhclr stutl and swing their mikes tor
a nuclear referendum benefl.t concert. All proceeds will go to the Mass.
Nuclear Relerend.4m Campaign. Slt
back, relax - aQd. vote yes.
(Tam o' Shan.ter is at 1648 Beacon
St. The concert begins at 8:30 p.m
and tickets are on sale at the door.)

of the Archer Building. Deme SL.
Beacon Hill. For more irifo. call 723A 700. X23Q.)

TUESDAY -

BOSTON LEDGER
BROOKLINE, MA.

Free Verse

W.15,000

APR

WEDNESI

Do the Fallout

We'll all go to Maine -

Get down, Il

T

hey may not h,
but the nwn and
17th and 18th centu1
how to kick up their
the New England Con
present a program c
dance from these eras,
music of Lully and
choreography from
Playford - the Bob Ft
time. The performa
presented in pe1iod cc
authentic Instruments.
(Admission is free }01
pro_qram at Jordan He
tington Ave. For more i,
1120.J

Bring out the Ii

0\982

F

oxes and other s
tures- will be lnl
stage at the Lyric Theati
week engagement of Lilli;
"The Little Foxes." Set .;
the century, the play
wealthy Southern fam
sumed by greed and a lu
and money that they w,
all who oppose them own kin.
(1'he play will run Jron



May 9. Tickets are $5.5(
discounts available. Fo1
performance times, call

Drama at the 0.1

S

D

M. Thomas. noted English
•poet. winner of the Cholmondelev Prize for poetry. and author
ol the best-sellin.({ novel "The White
Hotel" joins Diana Der Hovanessian,
talented Boston poet and translator
of the "Anthology of Armenian
Poetry... in a poetry reading at the
Boston Public Library
/Toniaht at 7:45 o.m. in tlw Rnhh

am Shepard's l~Jei
Western·-· bul you
it won't be of the John Wa
''True West," perlorm,
American Repertory The.
llrst-showing outside New
story ot the reunion of twc
lerent brothers - one
educated screen writer, U
itinerant burglar. But
blaze of the desert sun.
quite as it would seem.
(ToHight at 8 p.m. at the 1
ding Theatre. 10 Hol
{'nmhrirt.-,.n

·, ·,.,.., _ _.. .. -

Severi--Days To Go
We'll all go to Maine It'll be jun!

te

:he U.S.
,tng In
atlve -,tear the
in the
t what
Untverc In her
:: Fact,

in the
tt Sim-

ay. It is

W

e can shut our eyes. but it
won't go away & the prospect of a nuclear war is too close to
reality for comfort. which ls why !.:4!flolk Un1yc1~5lt¥, Is dedicating its
-SClence Week to a program enllded,
"Considering the Consequence& of
Nuclear War." The program opens today with a talk by Douglas Forbes of
the Mass. Civil Defense Agency about
nuclear protection for Massachusetts.

ee bop and boogie are on the
agenda tonight at Brookline's
Tam o· Shanter, when rock groups
Natural Boogie and The Visitors strut
their stull and swing their mikes tor
a nuclear referendum bcndit concert. All proceeds will go to the Mass.
Nuclear Relerend4m Campaign. Sit
back, relax - and vote yes.
(Tarn o· Shanter ts at 1648 Beacon
St. The concert begins at 8:30 p.m
and tickets are on sale at the door.)

(The lecture is at 1 p.m. tn Room 25

of the Archer Building. Deme SL.
Beacon Hill. For more info, call 723A

TUESDAY -

700. X23Q.)

GER

Get down, m'lady

T

hey may not have had disco.
but the men and women of the·
17th and 18th centuries still knew
how to kick up their heels. Tonight
the New Eagtand Conacrvuory will
present a program of music and
dance from these eras, Including the
music of Lully and Ramuea, and
choreography from Caroso and
Playford - the Bob Fosses of their
time. The performance will be
presented in period costum~s with
authentic instruments.
(Admission is free for the 8 p.m
proqram at Jordan Hall. 290 Huntington Ave. For more in.Jo, call 2621120.)

Free Verse

Ml.

!Ne'WI
E.ngtana
t{ewsi:~ _;.:z
___

WEDNESDAY

Do the Fallout

B

Edited by Amy Brown

Bring out the Hellman

F

oxes and other stealthy creatures· will be Inhabiting the
stage at the Lyric Theatre for the five
week engagement of Lillian Hellman's
"The Little Foxes." Set at the tum of
the century, the play examines a
wealthy Southern family so consumed by greed and a lust for power
and money that they would destroy
all who oppose them - even their
own kin.
(The play will run from April 7 to
May 9. Tickets are $5.50 to $8, with
discounts available. For info ,about
peljonnance times. call 742-8703.)

'



Drama at the O.K. Corral

S

am. Shepard's !,~test play is a
Western·-· bul you can b.e sun:,
it won't be of the John Wayne variety.
"True West," pt'rformed by the
American Repertory Theatre, in lts
first-showing outside New York, is the
story ot the reunion of two totally difterer1t brothers - one, an lvyeducated screen writer. the other an
itinerant burglar But under the
blaze of the desert sun. nothif!g is
quite as it would seem.
·
(Tonight at 8 p.m. at the Hasty Pud-

·

D

M. Thomas. noted English
•poet. winner of the Cholmondt'lev Prize for poetry. and author
o! the best-selling novel "The White
Hotel" joins Diana Der Hovanessian.
talented Boston poet and translator
o! the "Anthology of Armenian
Poetry... in a poetry reading at the
Boston Public Library
!Tm,inht nt

7·4."'i

n.TTL

in the Rabb

ding Theatre.

10 Holyoke St.,

,.., __ ,.,,.,.i.....,,...;,.1,... ....

_.,

"T":-1

"The Little Foxes." Set at the tum of
the century, the play examines a
wealthy Southern family so consumed by greed and a lust for power
and money that they would destroy
all who oppose them - even their
own kin.
(The play will run from Aprtl 7 to
May 9. Tickets are $5.50 to $8, with
discounts available. For irifo .abo.ut
performance times. call 742-8703.J

Drama at the O.K. Corral

S

UONDAY

am Shepard's lc~test. play is a
. Western - bul you can b,e sure,
H won·t be of the John Wayne variety:
"True West," perlormed t:iy the
American Repertory Theatre, · in its
lirst-showing outside New York, is the
story ol the reunion of two totally differer1 t brothers - one, an lvyeducatfd screen Writer. the other an
itinerant bur~lar But under the
blaze of the desert sun, nothing is
quite as it would seem
·'
·

D

M. Thomas. noted English
•poet. winner of the Cholmondeley Prize for poetry. and author
ol the best-selling novel ..The White
Hoter· joins Diana Der Hovanessian,
talented Boston poet and translator
ol the "Anthology of Armenian
Poetry... in a poetry reading at the
Boston Public Library.
(Tonight al 7:45 p.m. in the Rabb
Lecture Hall. Boston Public Library,
Copley Square. Admission ts _free.
For morl5 info. call 536-5400, x216.J

{Tonight at 8 p.m. at the Hasty Pudding Theatre. 10 Holyoke St.,
. Cambridge. Tickets are available
eai:ch day at theAR T. Box Office. the
Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattlt; SL,
Camb. Call 54 7-8300 between 11
a.m. and 5:30 p.m. _for more irifo.J

THURSDAY

This Bud's For You

I

t"s lime; again to don our prettiest
pastels and hid{' goodle-filled bas·kets around the house ~ but what
would Easter be without flowers? The
Massachusetts Horticultural Society
is olfering to the public their best
selection of orchids. lilies. azaleas,
and other spring-flowering plants in
a sale that starts today and ends on
Good Friday So don't miss out Grandma won·t be too pleased if Y<?U
lorget to bring her Easter lilies.
(Today through Friday. IO to 5 p.m.,
Wednesday evening until 8 p.m. at
Horticultural Hall. 300 Mass. Ave.)

e can shut our eyes, but it won't
go away & the prospect .of a
nuclear war is too close to reality for comfort, which is why Su~ University is
dedicating its Science WeK to !tprogram
entitled, ..Considering the Consequences
of Nuclear War." The program opens today with a talk by Douglas Forbes of the
Mass. Civil Defense Agency about nuclear
protection for Massach1;1setts.
(The lecture is at 1 p.m. in Room 25 of the
. Archer Building, Deme St., Beac1:n;i HHL
For more. info, call 723-4 700, x230.) . .

avin · a Johnny Cash attack.
pardner?Youcanflndreliefat
"Kickin' Rock & Roll," the Boston
Country Concert Series which contlnues tonight at the Paradise Club.
Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin Brothers
plus Ricky Skaggs Will have you
stomping your feet - with a little
sawdust on the floor. it would be the
real thing.
(At 8:30 p.m. at the Pradise, 969
Comm. Ave.. Allston. Tickets are $5;
MIi

?F,4-2052 for

more irifo.J

.• .

(

+

I'

H

Countrified Paradise

H

Playing the numbers :·

ave you got a bad case ot math
phobia? Let the Boston YWCA
help you find your hidden expertise
in their Math Finders course,
designed to get you into the math
.. place" you need to be to achieve your
- objective - whether ifs making
change. balancing your checkbook.
understanding your investments or
checking up on those who do handle
them. rrs all part of their April
program series on learning how to
manage your money effectively.
(The course begins tonight and runs

.for the next two Thursdays from 7:30
lo 9:30 p.m. The cost is $12. orS10jor
. ~nJq~~··Call Roslyn Saunders at
~;,.,.:,.i':::"7~40. x134jor more trifo.J

JuSTON HERALD AMERICAN

BOST ..,N HERALD AMERICAN

3QSTQN, MA.

BC ;JN, MA

c;

o,

436.814
Ne"9'

APR 4 t982

England

kuffolk 14~ Fram. St. 13

.,

APR\

{

I

110 52 41-14 6
~(0-2)
306 10 12-13 13
Blanchard; Elliott (3), Romano t6 .•
wood (7} aod Romano; Villani (61. and Romano {7); Grogan, White. (4), R~odes (6),
st Martir\ (7) and Hughes·. W-Romano O· ,
Ol L-'-Rhodes 10-11.

Newsclia

APR 7 1982

LOWELL. MA.
D. 56,04;5

NI Division 1 poll
11st Plac• votes. records

tn 1111rent11eses>

1. Maine (4) (Ml.
2. Ver"*lt (l) (5-1)
3. llrovldenee (6-10)
~. URI (,H)
5. New Hampshire IHl

u

~~~~----.......

i

1
2
1

· ( h t ~ Yotes. records ln 1i,arenlllesesl
..
l. Qulnnlplac (5) 17-2>

Pis.

' , 25

2. Lowelt{2-H

11

New Haven (1-1
4. Sprfnofleld (O-Ol

5. Stonehill (2-3)
6. S41uthern Conn

11

19

9
8

<a.+ 1>

NE Dlvlllon 3 poli
nst ptac;e votes. retordl Ill parentheses>
l. Easter:n Conn. l7l 17-3-ll
56

2.
3,
4.
5.
6.
1.

SE Mess<7-7l
Wesleyan UP-I)

40
32

Amherst (2-~
R.I. College {4-7)

28
23

Mass. Maritime (8-2-1 >

QUINCY. MAI

1

BATTING

NeW

AB

Miles, Alt
CIIVIO, Merr.
Westerberg, Ass.
VanHOuten,AIC

)!;.ng111u'1

l'i{e:wsclla

I

;r:~:.· :
Cannertv, L-.
packer, Sht.

~..-. -,wha~lo ~- Suff_olk
~~·
\},.•:
The
ntley ·College baseball team scored 26 runs ,.....
yes, ·26 ( six in the second
inning, five in the fourth, eight
in the seventh and seven in the
eighth)~ yesterday in rolling
over under-matched :suffotk,


8
6
6
8 ..
1
;
.5

n
11

~

. · ·

. . The victory was .Beniley's
first of the season, and broke
. last year's school record of 25
runs in a game, which was
also set against Suffolk.
Leading the attack for
$entley was Bob John~n wiih
three hits and seven RBI, .and
John Allen, who had a honie
rup and four R.BI. M~e
O.'Connor added four hits for
the Falcons, and Larry Copponi chipped in with th.tee..
. El&ewher, Dean Junior Col' lege got off to a fas( start,
·. scoring three nms ill the first
lnping; • but Rhode ·1sland
Community CO.llegeJetcaliated
' with six in the bQttom hall of
th¢ inning .en toiJJejo a 9~3
· decision. Dean's Bob Barori:e
;:l.tilocl{oo 'm:two riihs with a
siru:de.

W,L

13
14
20

'-

APR 1. 6 ,ss2

,. .~--

IP

Rldl, QulM.
2-0
we1s11. arv.
2-0
VanHCJulen,AIC 2.0
Tralecce. Qulm. U
DiFal:iblO, SQlnn. 2-4

17

22

88

SO

7
6
5
n
9 · 22

---- 10

.

'

.._SEBALL

Avg.

15
23
5
5

Smith. seonn,
-r
12
Clark, Ass.
Wengler, Brv. PITCHIJ~

BentleY. lllile

·

H

· 15
12,
12
17

, . ' :,

Harvard 12; B.C 7
Middlebury 25, Babson 7
../

2

Ni Div. 2 leaclert

D, 73.GlS

,!Sewscliu

s.: c.:~~~

21
14
, 3
2

8. es leld St. (1-31
9 WN6C(3-l)
.
10. Bates (2· 1)
Brandeis (H))
l2. Tufts ('0-2)

PAlRIOli LmG.m

26-1.

30

~~f !fnlvenltv (3--0l

England

~sumption 11, Clark 5
S~16, Curry 4
·
Era6soi'i 12, i=ramingham St. 4
Eckerd 7, Harvard 6
Eckerd 7; Harvard 6
E. Conn. 23, Colby 3
_
. .Massasoit 11, R..t; Junior College 3
,
'Northeastern 9, Holv Cross 9 CBJnns., darkness), •.· ··
,
· •,; · · ·· · ,
Quln·nipiac 10/ Bridgeport2 ° ,
S.E. Mass; 11. Mass. Maritime 4
Suffolk 16, Curry 4
SOFTBALL
BC 9, Merrimack~
· Brown 3; Brvant 1 ·
Brown 2; B.rvant o
Gordon B,. Barrington ,1 ,, ·
Gordon 5; :Barrington oi· .
Rhode islari'd t, Providence 2 '1 ' •.
RhodeJ.sland 3/Providetice3,
. Sal_ent: ~ta.~e 3;


6

NI Div11lon 2 polt

.
'

NeW'

1982

:_ College resu Its ·· 1

Pis.
24
21

'

7. Harvard 12-1>

. Lapsley, a sophomore, Js
expected to be a key player for the
Rams, who are coached by former
Red Sox pitcher Jim Willoughby.
·

NAR 31

Colleges

,. Yale (5-9)

· -·Lap;i~y Centerfielder For Suff-0lk
Sophomore Dave Lapsley of .
Quincy is the centerfielder for the
_~olk Uniuer,ity baseball team
which opens its season at Curry
March 20.

SUN.

:t'ilewscllg

/~folk (~O)

New'
Englancli

286,101

13

~ 12

.533
.500

.500
.,i7l

:m
.,55

.,ss
.,26

.,11
.'17
ERA
0 00
o 114
1.35
1 69

2.CM

~

Falcon bats explode, 26-7
The heavy cannonading of the
{Bentley College baseball team
' was certain to do in some opponent this spring.
.. · .
The inevitable happ·ened
Wedri-esday against S~olk
V n i ~ at the Bentley A .. etic
Field-as~e Fa~corui! hammered
a ·i'tlnaway
out, 25 bas,eknocks
_26-7 triumph. Suffolldu1d :stopped
Brandeis, 1-0, -Only. 24 _hours
earlier.·
'
Bentley, notching its first vi~
tpry mthree outing$,. belted the
horsehide ·all over·the. ballpark,
Tlie barrage included hQmertm,
fourJriples an~ fOlll' dolibJ,es. · ·
Bob JohnsQn, the .shol't$wp out
of catholic Mexriori,al, ,collected'

m

a

two singles and a· double to drfve
in seven runs: John Allen,
sophomore centerfielder from
Norwood, belted out a pair of
singles ahd a round tripper
four RBIs. Second baseman Andy
.Joakirµ, (Hyannis), first sacker
Tim Courossi and Larry. Copponi:
had three safeties apiece.
Righthander Kevin MacIntyre
was credited with the pitching.vi~
tqry•.. It· was ,a Bentley school
record, for the most runs scored,
surpassing the previous 25 scorea
against Suffolk last year. The
s~ry:
.

for

BEN_TLEY 1261-~0ombrowski 3-1;
~ohrison 6-3; Joakim 1~3; Courossi 6-

3: Copponi 7-3: Hoffman 5-3~ Crupi 1- ·
0; Allen 6-3; Clifford 5-1; Ruggerio 1-1;
O'Conrior&-4. Tot. 53-25. ·
SUFFOLK (71~-Clancy4-1; McH6ul 53; Romano 3,1; Bell 5-2; PeriUo•· 3-1; •Zecha 5-1; i>isa 1-0; Blanchard 1-0;,
Fabbia 1-0; .Sor-renti 3-0; Swaf! .3-0.
Tot.34-9.
,
Score by innings:, ·
Bentley ••.•. ·.......... 060 500 81~26 .
Suffolk .......... ~ .... 400 030 0Ck7
Doubles-.-Oombrowski, J.o~on;',
,Copponi, Hoffman, O'Connor. BeH2.
Triples--Joakim, Coµ.rossi; Hoffman, O'Connor.
· ·'
Home runs,-Allen, Perillo ...
Walks off Delaney 3, ll/lacli,tyre 4,
Pisa,3; Blanchard 2, Fabia 2, Elllot 3. . ..
,
Strikeouts by Delaney 3, MacfntyrSJe
6, Aisa 3,: Blanchard 1, Fabia 2>EHiot 1; · ,
WP-M.acfntyre. LP-Pisa.
.

....

U\WRENCE EAGLETRIBUNE

LAWRENCE, Ml

N\tttON RECORDTRANSCRIPT
MILTON. MA.

Ne-W

MAR2 2 1982

w. 6,220

England
,N" ,,·sdifi

Ne<#

England
Newsclii

11AR '2 5 1182

"-.s.iiffolk Nin~-Faces Curr)'
,, .. ·.

,

'

.·,

.

.

in Ope;~
.

. f,,lfQS'1'.9N . F~rty· candid.~tes, in- · .300 hitter, o( Steve Passateinpo,
waging a battle at first base.
· ' c1,\illing lt Jettermen, reported . to
'.~Were looking · for a dramatic
h~~A q~eh Joe.Walsh as the operlipg
.Jitpoor workouts 'for,·_the 1982. SijUolk inipr~vement ,oyer last ye~r,"
assesses Walsh. "March 30 can't
-:JJ;ruversityJ~_aseball team. got ·under
come soon enough for \JS, .We should
w~y._. .
.1
be stronger up.the midllie and while.
'The Rams, who open their season
we have a few· ifs, the potential pitCurry ~ollege Tuesday, March 30,
ching of Dalton, W<>od and Blanchard
·will be· trying to improve on a turgives us a lot to be optimistic about."
, brilent 1981 season, which saw coach
Suffolk will play a 22-game
Jim,Wmoughby resign in mid-season
s~hedule, all of the~ on the road, a
, and the team finish with a 5,15 record.
tradition Suffolk teams have endured
. Walsh; 1976 graduate and former
Suff()lk player , from . ·Milton· who . ~,Se their existence.
.a$5-~med the head coach position last
June, is· optimistic about the· coming
season. "We haven't got outside yet,·
butthere's been a very good attitude
attd a lot of spirit and we .will have a
·lotgfri~'W faces this.year."
TIMES • FREE PRESS
' f ! i\mQllj'the:rri is a hign hope pitcher,
EASTPEP~M
f'{f9nif··wood,.il transfer from Boston
w. 11.1100 ·12'i,J
·'St'ate ;-where he, was· the ·a:ce of that
.tea1~f.s>s~ft Walsh'·is counting on
righthariaer Wood to be 'a_ leading
Ne'1'
pjtc~er along with 6~4 junior John
Englattd
24 1982
J)altori of-Dorchester, a s~rter a year
Newsclig
:ag9, 'junior right-hander Jay Blan:ch~r,d of Weymouth, who also saw a
lo~ <>f-caction a year ago, and lefthani -~PiGar.y;Pi~a1,_a,foa9sfe1(froinr~ass.

at

a

'

:Max Bishop

Playdon, had
.
solid seas.on
'

1 Sophomore Sharon Play don of Salem,,
'"'-~.H.., turned in an outstanding performancei
this season for the nationally ranked Spring-,
.field College basketball team which wour.id U_!?
wfth an overall 23-3 record.
'
The Salem High gr.ad was named to the
Northeast-8 Conference AU-Star team and
'"was further honored by being selected as the
: , Outstanding Player in the New England Re., gional Tournament in which Springfi(ald defeated Bentl~y. She was tbe key in the victory
with'--24 points aAd eigtitcreb9unds.

, ;, •

MAR

':ifa~©MnmunttyiC~ohege.h0,.[n:u t1 ,.,>.JL

:~~ne''l>f'W'alsh1s', pM~tiJ ~ms Wilt'
~e to tighten -up1a •pboous<Rams ,m~'
· fieJp, which cost the Rams a number
.ofwins last year. He thinks he inay
have with sophomore third baseman
Joe Clancy of Hirigham, two freshmen, Eric Swan of :O<>rcllester and
I Catholic and !,Mark Foley, former .
Milton High captain, both battlh1g for
· - sHprtstop( berth, second baseman ,
. Diwe Sorrenti of Whitman, a~enior
who' hit .. 290 a year, ago and. first
baseman Steve Bell of Weymouth, a
i

.,;_

\J~r;-wooc1 s.-1~~
To Pitch For' 1982
Suffolk BaU Team

John Wood, of East Boston,
was among the 40 candidates, including 13 lettermen, who ,
reported to Head Coach Joe
Walsh as the opening indoor
workouts for 1982 Suffolk University baseball t e a ~ y .
Wood, a high hope pitcher, is a
transfer from Boston State
where be was the ace of that
.
team's staff.
Coach Walsh is counting on
rigbtbander Wood to be a leading
pitcher along with 6-4 junior John
Dalton of Dorebester, a starter a
year ago; Jay Blanchard, of
Weymouth, who also saw a lot of
action a year ago, and leftbander
Gary Pisa, of Middleton, a
transfer from Mass. Bay Com-

, m~e.

~

, >;··

Sharon_ Ploydon

_Gil Desrosiers

~

1

·Sharon,'a 5-·11 forward; used h~r height t~
great advantage. She led .the Maroons in rebounding (1.1.5 per game) and was very strong
offensively inside, finishing second in te,am
:~scoring with 411 points (15.8 per). Shtf II have
''a big ro,le to fill next s~aso~ as Springfield's
other two All-Stars are seniors.
GaljY Lindgren, an All-Cape Ann League
defenseman at North Reading High, wound up
his hockey career at the University of New
, Haven this winter. The Chargers finished at
... 12-12:1 including a victory over Merrimack
·?College.The hard-hitting backliner, who led
~ the team in penalty minutes, scored nine. goals
_and assisted on 17; others.
·1 •
,'
_ , Mike Regan, of' Haverhill, co~captain of the
. Williams to11ege~swimming team, was the..re.:
, cipient of the Robert Muir Award at the recent'
New England Intercollegiate Swimming Asso,
· ciation championships held at the Univ. of
Rhode Island.
'
,
It is given to the senror who has scored,the
. most points in th!3 championships over a four
.. year period. This year, Regan ~on the 50 free, style, 100 freestyle and was a member of two
winnirg relay teams. H~ wa'.s -a high school AIISch.olastic-for two years at Haverhill.'
·"
Ex-Lawrence High cager, Gil Desrosiers.
/
"./
.
. '
: will be able to say he was a member of the
' last team to represent. Boston State Qollege~ in
,. basketball ..Come ilP.Yt fall,' A.ncitAn, ca~+,..···"'
·t~-

Oaseman
· ::Jo¢ Clancy of Hingham, two freshm,¢ii,, Eric Swan .of I;>ortjlester and ·
'r, Qatholic· ·and ·-Mark •Foley, former .
.Milton Higlt captain, both battling for
_· silortslop . berth, second baseman
· :Diwe Sorrenti of Whitman, a §.enior
wh<rhft .. 290 a year- ago and first /
baseman Steve Bell of Weymouth, a '
...;.~•;';' .. vv.<Wl "U}.lllUllJUl"t:

L!lll"O

was among the 40candidates:~:
eluding 13 lettermen, who
reported to Head Coach Joe
Walsh as the opening indoor
workouts for 1982 Suffolk University baseball t e a ~ y .
Wood, a high hope pitcher, is a
transfer from Boston State
where he was the ace -of that
ie.m's staff.
Coach Walsh is counting on
rigbthander Wood to be a leading
pitcher along with 6-4 junior John
Dalton of Dorchester, a starter a
year ago; Jay Blanchard, of
Weymouth, who also saw a lot of
action a year ago, and leftbander
Gary Pisa, of Middleton, a
transfer from Mass. Bay Com. m~_,.e_.- - -...--. __

oounamg ( 11..1 .5 per garpe) and was very strong
offensively inside, finishing second ii) te,am
~scoring with 411 points ( 15.8 per), ShEf II have
big ro,le to fill next s~ason l:ls Springfield's
other two All-Stars are seniors.
~ary Lindgren, an AII-Cl:lp~ Ann League
defens~man at North Reaqing High, wound up
his hockey.career at the University of New
, Haven this winter. The Chargers finished at
. -·• 12-12-1 including a victory.over Merrimack
· :, College. The hard-hitting backliner, whd led
., the -team in penalty minutes, scored nine. goals
~ and assisted on 17, others.
' .
- .,
Mike Regan, of' Haverhill, co-captain of ·the
. Williams_ CoUege~swimming team, was the re~
. cipient of the Robert Muir Award at the recent' '
New England Intercollegiate Swimming Asso~
ciatiOlil championships held at the Univ. of
Rhode Island.
·
,
It is gh(Em to the senror who has scored the
, most points in the championships over a four
. year period. This year, Regan "1{0n the 50 free. style, 100 freestyle and wa~ a member of two
winnij,g relay teams. He Was ·a high school AIIS<;:holastic -for two years at Haverhill. '
-/
Ex-Lawrenc~ Higy cager, Gil_ Desrosiers,.
will be able t_o say he was a member of the
' last t~am to represent Boston $~ate follege in
'' basketball. come next fall,' Bostotj, State will
',, be absorbed by'u'Mass Boston. This winter,
'the 1978' Lawrence grad averaged 7.2 points
and 6_.5 rebounds a game. He got off to" a slow
start -but came on in the second half of the
r season.

J\ccordi~g to.Suffolk University\ baseball
coach Joe W a J s h ~ e t t y well set
a_nd includes sophomore Bart Perillo, ex-Me·, • thuen High in left field. Another area player
,: who Walsh .figures can help is Masconomet's
Gary Pisa, transfer from Mass Bay CC.
'•
·· A couple of local boys captured top ath~
letic honors at Austin Prep. Don Foucher, a
:' co-captain, was presented the Most Valuable
,, Player Award'in track and Andover's Dennis
1 , Glynn, also a co-captain, was thE:l co-winner of
~ the MVP in baskE:itball.
,
,
.
-. t
Timberlane Regional track"coach Peggy
t 'Morsch has been selected Coach of the Year
p for the N.H. Indoor League season. In her second year, she gu)ded Timberlane to its best
;: +indoor season ever, 23-6, and had·two state
\· '* ·champs, Patsy Booker and Beth Latham.
\i
While on tbe subject of Timberlane, bas-ketball coach Bucky Tardif will coach the New
Hampshire All-Star squad that will face, the
Vermor;it Stars in the Alhambran Classic-June · 26 at New Ha_mpshir~ College. Two of Buck's
boys, Dave Kirsch and Andy Etuley are on
' ; the N.H. team. The N.H. girls will also play on
, the same card and include Pinkerton's Robin
: Blattenberger and Londonderry's Kathy Hud:· son.

··a

_

_



0

a

I

t

John l\tlOrin, ex-Met~uen High·ctefenseman, had'another fine season with the
Babson College hockey team tnis Winter. As a
, freshman l~st season, he took a regular turn
· and became our best defenseman by the end
{,/
.
.
t'
,,
, of the season," noted Coach Steve Stirling.
,
At the recent Ni.chols College basketbaJt ,
· banquet, sophomo~e Jim Grover : who played
under Bob L.icare at ·North Andover High, re~
ceived his varsity letteri

J$2~·1m drive launched by Sitffol_If U~iversfty, '_ -~;
1

,_: Trustees of Sy.ffolk University launched a cam-_ Donahue and Archer buildingsaliS,Q i;u;e pfa:nned:
paign this week tp raise funds for the renovation of
Although he is retiring as
c;~; ·
·· ·
. -~veral universit~. h~ildings'.
_:
,;,
direct·. th~ canipaign •s l~dershiQ g ·
·. . The $2. 7 million Campaign _for Excellence was .. whic~ plans to SQlicit alumni gifts
announced.at a dinner honoring retiring Suffolk six.>.· thsofig··si
·
'1.'
.. ,
.· ·
·
mon
,, ...._.,:·,<:.~---.-.t _._._.r.",. .......... ,J\-;,,.,'
preside~t Thomas A. Fulham. The money will be
·
. _ . ·
.
. Cf,,;;,:' ,, .,,;
used t-0 renovate the 12-story former United Way
Aboµt 400 alumni .and friends att¢nded Tues- ,
bttifding on Somerset street and Ashburton place. It day's dinner honoring FUiham at the .Park' Plaza. ·
~W'tll house the university's school management Fulham, the university's sixth pi;es\aerit, l1as
~rid other facilities, according to board chairman served.since 1979. H~ is due to retire July 18, }:lis
VJnceht A. Fulmer. Alterations to the university's - 65th birthday.
.. ·
·

pres~~9

BOSTON GLOBE
BOSTON, MA.
D. 480,691

4UN5

Newscli~

of

~-·

BOSTON HERAID

AMERICAN
BOSTON! MA.
D. 286,10

JUN4 1980

New.
Engl~
.t'l[e:wsd'i~

-

New
England

Fulh&m, Suffolk U~, honore<i· ,

Suffolk University honored its
retirin'E President Thomas. A. Ful. ham last night, and at the same
! time announced the start of a $2. 7
l: million capital campaign.
,· · Some 400 alumni and friends
paid tribute to Fulham, the univer. sity's sixth president, at a dinner'at
,. the Park-Plaza. Fulham is scheduled
L to retire July 18, the date of.his 65th
Lbirthday, after 10 years as head of
the Beacon Hill Institution.
Vincent A. Fulmer, chairman of
t; the university board of trustees,
1·· said the capital campaign, entitled,

~.'The· Campaign for Excellence,''
will provide fors tptal renovation of
~he 12~story former United Wa.y .:;
Building on Somerset Street and ;:
Ashburton. Place,. which will housl ;
t~e 'university's School-of Manage~::;
ment and other academic divisions... ;
There also will be substantial alter~ .;
ations to the university's Donahu/ '.'
~nd Archer buildings. · _,,
• ,t
i Fulham, although stepping do'wn· ,: ;
as p:i:esident, will direct the lead- · '.
ership gifts committee for the cam- ; l
paign, wkich will conduct general . j
solicitation of alumni gifts during· ·.
the firstsix months of 1981.
·. · -'--~.:;..,;,.

.-

'

C2 THE SUNDAY SUN, LOWELL, MASS., NOVEMBER 8, 1981

AT ·s0Fi61.K uN1veRs1rv r:uNPRAtSiR ·
·...John Howe, trustee chairman, M~lvin Cheney; ~hairrncin Qf fL1nd for col!;g,s, i,,niyerslty President Dr. Daniel
Perlman and his wife, t>r. Suzcinsit, Perl!'l'lal'I, al'ld ~harles tsapi:atsar-!s, host

"1.1.ffnllr lTn.1,rA···i~txr.;];giJ,,:S;•bchL:-QQ

AT SU'FFOLK UNIVERSITY FUNDAAISER·
...John Howe, trustee chairmctn, Melvin Cheney, ~halrman of ftmd for cc;ll;gcts, !,Jniyer$ity President Or. Daniel
Perlman and his wlfe, Or. Suzanr•ut Perlm,a11, and Charles Tsappt~ar·!s, ht:>st ·
·

$Qff9Jk Uniy~nri:tylau~~ -··' ~···--·

appeal to Lowell ·area tilutnni

Iiaw School; t}le CQllege af A'tts ·@ti · Among those in attendance: ColSciences, the School of Ma11g~m.ent. ette Cheney ... the. Walter Coqks ...
LOWELL.,- Looking ahead to, a
The universi_ty recently ti~qµired Atty.JosephHannoq.,.Dianellarris
decade of development, Boston'!! 75~ one of Beacon :Elill's mosfpr9iriinent ... Frank Whitson, Suffolk's directeir
..... yeat.old_.~uft'olk Vniversit! 11ent its, buildings, the fgrmer Uniteil Way of of development ... Mrs. Jon Whitson
biggest guns, new president Dr. Mass. Bay offices at 8 Ashbttrton ... Linda Cummings ... Robert West,
Daniel a.-Perlman and chairman of Place. Putchased for $605,00(),;the Suffolk's director of Alumni Prog.
1 the board of trustees john Howe to
12-story building answers Suffolk's rams.
Lowell tp help raise sorhe of the nieeiJ.s. in many ways, and its renovaAlsQ; Kenneth Latham , .. the
$2,735,000 needed by the end of the tion ts a first step in a carefully plan- Michael :Unquatas ... Georgia and
year to complete it~ "Campaign for · ned development project that jn. Atty. William MeColough ... the
.', Excellence". At a co6lt,tail party held volves re,wotk:ing and maintenance ,Joseph Shanahans ... Dr. l3eatrice
at the home of Elizabeth and Charles . of all the Univeraity's existing. build.· St1ow' ... William Spallos .,. the :Frank
Tsapatsatis on Andover Street, sons . ings. Costing just under $10,000,000, T~tys ... Peter and Elaine Tsafsat,i; .and,daug_htersofSuffolkheard_t_heir ·$2,735,000ofthisisbei:µgra:ised,tia
·
d ,,
·t ·
.
, saris ... ca.to1yn artdJ ~es we1.a ... ,
;,,- AlmaMatere,ctolle as aunivers1 Y the·"Campai,gn ·for E~cellen,ce' Dr. Arthut'Best.
·
" of our times''"Where,;said Dr,,Perl- which·is'headed by :Mr. HQwe, who.
t in~. ''the.seats hardly have a chance· r spuire' al,outthis in Lowell-:-~. . . ..... .
• tocobl" as classes are held continualOr. Pe:i:lman pointed out that Suf, ly, night and day. ·
. folk, the 8th largest law school in the
.Dr .. Perlman, who assumed his country:; has the largest law library
. • duti,e11 as Suffollt prexy this past in Bostoh - its apace to be inorea~ed
:; September, is the· youngest ever to by 40 per cent in the expansion prog•
(5 . 11erve ·Jn that post. Formerly vice ram. He ·and tvir. Howe enlal'ged
2'. president. for administration at on the-development plans and thank:if Roosevelt UniVersity in C~icago, h:e e~ the '~proud, conc.erned alumni"
reminded his listeners of Suffolk's Whp are itrengthening and enriching
tradition ofexcellence, begun fn 1906 theil'. university with thefr pledges of
wh~n a young Boston lawyer, support. .
·
,+ Gleason L. 1).rcher, ·established a CocktiJils and a burt:et were folschool of law "for. ambitious young lowed by:a s.l.ide 1:1how t~at illcluded
men ·who are obliged to work for a shots of the University's "main c_amliving while studying'\
. pus". A display of paintings owned by
Currently, a student body of Melvin Cheney, BA '50, enlivened
almost 650(); is servt!d by full and the lj-ving room, These included some
_part-time programs in all the urider, striking originals Mel has· acquired
graduate ancfgraduate departtne?-ts. ovet the years, oils and lithographs
An~· 10 per.~ent ~f them ?ol~ Jobs py l'icasso, Dali, Touliause-Lautr~c, ,
whllepursu1:\}gth~1reducationm the Duf}' .and others.
l . ,
'/' .-:-_.
·

By NlA~Y S~PAs

Sun Con-esvon~ent·

I

-

Jr_

----

~~--

':flt i'Mm1,·•".P·····~Jlf~f~1ii~tal·1'-·

,.,,r/(, ,/,,. 't~:,r,, '...:: .~r-t. '. .,:
1

t

. . . : ---~;~~ ..:.·

niver~ity :h8;S e~~eed~ by 31 ~f-. ,non~gt.;::W~ieh forinei-1Y. housed .th; SftAooJ oL,
1;1aign for. Excelle11c:e . g~al. ~he.. 7a"' .managemept, were sold for reconversion to resi~
, Y~!.S,~tY, o~ ~~:11 Hill\ ~hic;I:i. ,~~s . dential µ~and r«:turned to tii~_city's.~ rolls i~
HiIL
,19-°'? a,~ an evening ta.w school, now accordanqe with , promt~ m11de to
Otltm;1e,nts taking d8:Y and 1?-ight neighbo~ ,lJy Suflolk President Daniel ft Retlits ,!::i~. S<Jhool,. coll~g~?f liber~I <lfts man:
ff · .. '.':
· , , ,. • ; · · .
a~~ 1t~-~hoo~of11,1~n11gement . . · q1f,ts:1o.Suffolk during the c11mpatgn. which
'entc;aijpaign, Jaurieh~ in '~m- • was/ ~a~ized ,by John S. Howe, include a
it 1979, rat~·· if'i!t6 mill~oh)tawards lgng- ·. $25p,~krchallenge ~rant from t~e Kresge, F,oll:n-::
r~~ge fl,nfn~ipg,~~,Jih~ ~~dversit:y's $10 million dationl} . oy, Mi~h., $150,000fro~ the lf11yden
,1'\,Pilit1'S\De've1opment Program. Funds ,will. Foi.:,r>,d!ltion of Nf:w York 11nd $75iooo from the
mitke .~ible th~ rehabilitation of Suffdlk's Perm11rtent Charity·Fund ot Bos~n.
. .
.
M~ ii~stbry····· building al: 8 Aspburto~p.l., hous.
~.'!mni pledg~ l!ll. l milJion durin.g 26 even-..
·t~g,the ~hool 'of m11Qage~J1t, tlie Mildred Saw- Ing rhon11thons.
..
1 y~.r;Library. c)a~srooms, office~d1 computer cen.. Jl4ajor gifts from individu11I benefactors total
..
··
~l.5*1,000. given by Frank Sllwyer, .Esther E.
ter;,llnda c11fetert11.
)Th~ two towhhotises at 45 an~·47
$p~ane; Stephen P. Mu~ar, E: Albert PaJlot, Id11\
....,.
. •j .
.
.
Mt, Ver~ 11nl!Cecil Green, and Jµage C. Edward.Rowe.·

Beacon.

·.

1

1



F:

I

_______ --~-

lege

Donald H Smith,

·. ·



.

_

Gladys Chang Hardy

i

_ _

.

_



••

• • • • • .•

. __ .,- .......... -.1v1111e;::r:-pr€fsident of U·. of

Illinois, December 28 in New York

(!i,ronilJt,, d llt1her £iuuftin

/-1j-p.3.-

Pr1vate Gifts and Grants
SHELBY CULLOM DAVIS FOUNDATION
70 Pine Street, New York 10005
Business-university relations. For programs to improve understanding ·and cooperation between
the business and academic communities:
$200,000 divided among 12 colleges and universities
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
343 State Street
Rochester, N Y. 14650
Associations. For support of programs: $547,225
divid~d !'mong 34 education organizations and
associations.
Minority groups. For programs for minority
• groups: $1 I-million divided among 61 colleges
and universities
Research. For graduate fellowships and research
projects: $1?0,~ _divided among 17 depart·
. .
. .
ments ~t 16 mstltullons_.
Studentaid. For scholarships: $1.3-milhon d1v1ded
among 617 undergraduates
Support. For undergraduate scholarships and designated projects: $628,300 divided among 124
colleges and universjties
GENERAL ELECTRIC FOUNDATION
Fairfield, Conn 06431
Management. For a professorship in corporate
management and for the center for management
policy, strategy, and organization: $1 5-million
to U. of Pennsylvania
HALLMARK EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION
P 0. Box 437; Kanstrs City, Mo 64108
Business education. For the g·raduate and undergraduate business programs, '$750,000 to Rockburst College
WILLIAM AND FLORA HEWLETI
FOUNDATION
Two Palo Alto Square, Suite JOJO
Palo Alto, Cal 94304
Support, For programs of faculty and curriculum
development: $200,000 to Skidmore College
(This grant was given jointly with the Andrew
W Mellon Foundation )
HOUSTON ENDOWMENT.
P.O. Box 52338, Houston 77052
Student aid. For scholarships: $50,000 to U. of
Houston Downtown College
KRESGE FOUNDATION
2401 West Big Beaver Road
· Troy, Mich 48084
Facilities. For a dining facility: $150,000 to Aurora
College.
-For a recreation center and fm= renovation oJ a
recital and rehearsal hall: $150,000 to Briar Cliff
College.

-For a computer,sc'ience center: $75,000 to Carroil College (Wis ) :
-For renovation projects: $75,000 to Cornell College (Iowa) and $25,000 to Webb Institute of Naval Architecture '
-For a student center: $100,000 to Hartwick College
.
-For a physical-education center: $400,000 to
Kalamazoo College,
-For a biology and chemistry facility: $200,000 to
Linfield College. · ·
-For a chapel: $100,000 to Meredith College.
-For a centra!:seniices b_uilding: _$150,000 to
Southern Baptist Theolog1cal Semmary.
For renovations: $150,000 io St. Olaf College
'fFor purchasing and renovation projects).
$250,000 to Suffolk u.
For a natatorium: $300,000 to Swarthmore College · . .
.
-For an mterculturat~enter: $850,000 to Tufts U.
-Fo~ a mall and student housmg: $200,000 to
U mon U
.
-For construction projects: $750,000 to U of
Southern California.
-For expansion. and, .renovation of the library:
$250,000 to Wittenberg U
-For renovation of 'a laboratory: $300,000 to
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
McDONNELL,OOUGLAS FOUNDATION
P.O. Box 516, St.Louis 63166
Engineering. For the Missouri Engineering Research and Education Mirror Fusion Facility;
$I-million to U o_f Missouri at Columbia
ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION
140 East 62nd Street, New York 10021
Support. For programs of faculty an<! curriculum
development: $200;000 t.o Skidmore College
(This grant was given jointly with the William
and Flora Hewlett: foundation )
.
M. J. MURDOCK CHAlUTABLE TRUST
915 Broadway
Vancouver, Wash 98660
Forestry. For a research facility at Lubrecht Experimental Forest: $524,000 to U. of Montana

KATE B. REYNOLDS HEALTH CARE TRUST
910 First Union National Bank Building
Winston-Salem, N C 27101
Nursing. For a bachelor's-degree program in nursing; $143,060 to Gardner-Webb College
Z. SMITH REYNOLDS FOUNDATION
1225 Wachovia Building
Winston-Salem, N.C 27101
Regional l'rograi;.s. For the Center for Improving
Mountam Living: $250,000 to Western Carolina
U.
·
ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION
.
.
1133 Avenue of the Americas
. .
New Yor~ 10036
.
. .
Medicine. For research m geographic med1cme:
$75,000 to Case Western Reserve U
SAINT PAUL FOUNDATION
I 120 Northwestern National Bank Building
St Paul 55101
·
. •
.
.
Fund ra1S1ng. For the capital campaign: $60,000 to
M~calester Co!Iege.
CHARLES J. STROSACKER FOUNDATION
907 West Park Drive
Midland, Mich. 48640
Research. For research by junior faculty members
in the graduate school of business administration: $100,000 to U of Michigan.
WHITAKER FOUNDATION
875 Poplar Church Road
Camp Hill, Pa. 17011
Engineering. For research in biomedical engineer"
ing: $104,479 to Case Western Reserve U

Gifts and Bequests
Cornell University, For the computer-aided-de·
sign instructional facility, the laboratory of
atomic and solid-state physics, the college of engineering, the department of chemistry, and the
National Research and Resource Facility for
Submicron· Structures: $288,000 over three
years from Xerox Corporation
Florida Atlantic University. For a pro.fessorship in
community education: $600,000 from Mr and
Mrs Raymond Pearlson, U; S Sugar Corporation, and Charl~s Stewart Mott Founda_tion
Furman University. For professorships in economics and business administrat!on: $1-million

NORTHWEST AREA FOUNDATION
W-975 First National Bank Building
St Paul 55 IOI .
Health services. For a research-and-teaching professorship: $250,000 to· Minnesota Medical
Foundation . (This corrects an item that ap- '
from an anonymous donor
peared in the December 9 issue )
University of 'Oregon. For the library, music
school, and academic scholarships: over $!-mil·
PEW MEMORIAL TRUST
lion in stock from William and Doris Scharpf,
c/o Glenmede Trust Company
Lois Scharpf Ree·d, and George Scharpf
1529 Walnut Street, Philadelphia 19102
Princeton University Press, To,continue work on
Libraries. For the library's computerization prothe papers of Albert Einstein: $I-million from
gram: $118,000 to Case Western Reserve U
Harold W McGraw, Jr

I

I
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I

i--pi~--~or The·. Future ·
-· ~

-lied

The L - e 1ew
four times a
year, in J
ary; March, June and September. The editorial board consists _of an
editor-in-chief, PhilipM. Cronin, a managing
editor, Professor:.Jos,eph D, Cronin of Suffolk
L~ool, · and about twenty associate
editors. The board meets regularly once a
month to dis<:uss articles ready for publication, articles submitted for acceptance and
important -decisions of the Massachusetts
Supreme Judicial Court and Appeals Court
and The United States Court of A ~ for
the First Circuit.
.

MA~ACHUSETTS
LAWYERS WEEKLY

preme Judicial Court, traces the history of
the· Appeals Court for the decade-, and the
other by Judith Miles, staff attorney for the
Appeals-Court, descnl>es the internal procedures of the Court. There will also be articles
on efforts to erode the ethical improvements
in the Bankruptcy Code and on a program of
mediation in the courts as a means of dispute
resolution.
·

Members of the 1982-1983 Editorial Board
include:
Philip M, Cronin, Boston
Joseph D. Cronin, Boston
The Review· receives both solicited and
William H. Abrasbkin, Hyannis
J · M Berry Bo
· unsolicited manuscripts from members of
the Massachusetts Bar. The Review urges
W~m.J; Brisk,
and encourages members of the bar to does _
subHeory E . Clay, J r., Boston .
mit articles for publication. The author ·
Hartley c. cutter, Chestnut Hill
not need to submit a final draft of an article,
- - · s• D-ibb'- J r., Spriogfi-•di.,.;__ . .
r&cua;lS
:ae,.
~
· but the Reviewwelcomestelep,JUUC inqwnes
Richard M. Gelb, Boston
of interest and article outlines.
Bart J , Gordon,- 1:-.....n Id
ut"UUfiUe

:S::0

The Review's policy isto print in-depth and
perceptive articles that are also of practical
assistance to practitioners. During the past
year,-.tbe Review published a three-part
analysis of the new Massachusetts Rules of
Criminal Procedure.· It al$> ran an article
discussing the difficult question of the right
to jury trial in actions under General Laws,
Chapter 93A.
The Massach~tts Appeals Court is now a
decade old. TheSeptemberissuewillcontain
two articles in recognition of that: one by
Daniel F. Jobnedis, legal counsel to the Su-

Jeremiah F. Healy, m, Boston
,JQlm H. Henn, Boston
Mark R. Karsner, Taunton
Gordon P. Katz, Boston
Brian T. Kenner, Boston
- Judith E. Miles, Amherst
Yoland~ R. Mitchell, Boston
Stephen R. Politi, Boston
S. Stephen Rosenfeld, Boston
Mar~hall R. Stein, Boston
Gilda M. Tuoni, Boston
.James E. Wallace, .Jr., Worcester
Jerry E. Benezra, Melrose

BOSTON, MA.

w. 14,000

OCT 11 932

New
England
Newselip

BOSTON SUNDAY. GLOOB
BOSTON, MA

s.

606,389

SEP 12198l

Law flJlls

i, .iclding
Wiarfor
tlew lawyers
... •-.,•,,1

',.,;_. .
BY. N.J.ck King
Globe-Staff
:r,j.(•
-~ l~Jhis period of national recession, when
mtnY.: · graduates of professional schools are
h~r~r:Pressed to find jobs that can support
t¥,f ,salaries for. new lawyers are cqntinuing
t~e1r;:~f}atp upward spiral.
:{

".i -

<AJ

-

'

top Boston law firms this fall, lawyers
fr~sq Qut pf law school are being paid first-year
s~}a(ies of about $35,000 - about $3000 more
th~tr..last year ...In Washington, D.C., starting
salarres are up to $40,00Q. In New York. the trac_
diMnal pay-scale pacesetter, beginning salaries
h~v~reached the $45,000 to $50,000 range.

,i "It~ j1,1sf like any other market," said attorn,:: J~~es ~- Chase of Bingham Dana & Gould
in,, .Boston. You have to pay what the market
will bear."

~ But there is concern that bµrgeoning legal
s~laries are widening the gap between public ·
a,d private sector wages, turning many young
l~)Vye:s away from government and community
w~rk .. ,

~t,+•.:.+..

Rob~rt-Bonsignore visifs .fobe's downtown.officeJo present ·Globe-I
Santa with.a $1000. contribution from members-of.. the Student Bar·,
~ssn. of ~qffolk Univetidiy;'Law School. . GLOBE ~H<?tchY JOE DENNEHY .

'

. ',

;

Recent studies have shown that fewer law~
yet,s"a're taking public sector jobs or indigent defertse work because of financial concerns. lnsf~d, more roung lawyers than ever are joining
la~e law firllls or businesses, such as banks,
aocounting houses and insurance companies,
w~ich have expanded their own in-house legal
s~ffs in direct competition with outside firms:

OEC

'VI!

22198,

~One recent study by a special Massachusetts
co)pmission noted that governmental salaries
h~e are so low that many qualified professionals can't afford the financial sacrifice of working in the public sector.
,;:
1For instance. a new lawver in the corpora-

1111 -.u."" ...............u.L oLI.A'-'J'

Assn. OI :StU,IO.IX UntvettiJLY, L,a\V ;::;c11001.
'

7

'

'

'

'



LJJ

a

~J:''CA,J.CU J.YIC:U~:>i:ll.:UU~C'LL::i

co7:nmission noted that governmental salaries
h~fe are .so low that many qualified profession. als, can't afford the financial sacrifice of working in the public sector.

'

~

'

~For instance, a new lawyer in the corporatiop counsel's office of the city of Boston is paid
about $22,000, at least $12,000 less than the
st,rting salary at a leading Boston law firm .
.;

~ "This places an absolute premium on finding. people motivated by something. other than
s'1ary to work in the r• 1blic sector," said
B(ownlow Speer, a lawye. ,fth the MassachuseJts Defenders Committee.
'i(,

t Despite the continuing rise in lawyer salari~s. the lat~st increases are less than in prev«,us years. 1Law firms, according to law office
nfitnagers, are searching for ways to cut over_tijad and redl!_c~_,c_l_l~nt.c.olr!p_!_air.i!s-. ab_<?~t ~igh
fees.

·

::

-

· ·

,/

.{ "The size of salaries is certainly a matter of
c@cern," said James Cotter of Choate Han &
S~wart in Boston. Added John Repola of Gasto;h Snow & Ely Bartlett ih Boston: "We don't
wlJ.nt ~o price ourselves out of the market. We
tlave to be more efficient."
.
~

'

~ Starting salaries have been an important,

aoo sensitive, issue for law firms ever since the
ID¥11960s, when the bidding war for new lawyers began in New York, sparking the salary exp~ion. SinGe 1966, first-year associate salaries
in• New York have grown more than five-fold
$8000 to $45,000.

fr?m

· ;; The competition for the best and brightest
fiist-year associates is, stiff, particularly in a
small, crowded law market such as Boston's or
i~:a high-powered one such as New York's. One
lawyer compared the bidding for top law students with competition among sports franctv.ses for "bonus-baby" athletes, who are offeted high salaries in the present for anticipated
performance in the future.


. ~ "The good law student has multiple opportuJiit.ies, so salary is important," said John C.
Deliso, assistant dean at Suffolk University Law
School.
; ; David Walsh, 24, of Cambridge, who gradua;t~d from StG'ol~aw School this year, isa case
in:point. He me dow.n law firm offers to work
instead for IBM's legal department i.n Armonk,
N.Y.
-

' : "I chose it because I can avoid the usual twoy~ar apprenticeship at a law firm, will get busil)ess exposure and will be paid competitively
"!Jith New York firms," Walsh said.
; ; Catalyst Legal Resources Inc., a_ New YorkD!'!sed legal recruiting firm, recently surveyed
s,tarting lawyer salaries in 10 ·cities; including
Ji3oston. Because of the recession, said Catalyst's
J~mes Pantaleo, first-ye~r sal~ries are up 9 per<!ent or 10 percent instead of the 12 percent or
~q percent of past years.
~ According to the survey, Boston firms with
in.ore than 100 lawyers are paying about

$35,000 to new associates this fall, while busi-·
fi¢sses pay new lawyers about $28,000, and gov~r:nmept;.z,apout $21,000. Law salaries drop
1)1;:trkedly w1fb the size of the firm, however,
1m{ firms of under 20 lawyers offering new as~~tat~s $25,000 to $28,000.
; ' In addition to new salary increases, large
~ston law firms~_are also continuing to expand
this fall, ,the traditional season for bringing new
...i....,___ !_J......:_

J

· · i

-''---

~ -

"

-



'ln ~nnw 1<:. t~Ll'inrf nT'\ ·,"'

.•

ua:vc; LV UC u1u1c:;: CUJl,;H:;IJl.

-

JStarting salaries have been an important,

aoo sensitive, issue for law firms ever since the
mid 1960s, when the bidding war for new lawyers began in New York, sparking the salary expli!lsion. Sinc;_e 1966, first-year associate salaries
in: New York have grown more than five-fold
friim $8000 to $45,000.

· ;; The competition for the best and brightest
fiist-year associates is· stiff, particularly in a
small, crowded law market such as Boston's or
i~;a high-powered one such as New York's. One
la~yer compared the bidding for top law students with competition among sports franc}tises for "bonus-baby" athletes, who are offeted high salaries in the present for anticipated
performance in the future .
. :, "The good law student has multiple opportuQities, so salary is important," said John C.
Deliso, assistant dean at Suffolk University Law
School.
., ~ David Walsh, 24, of Cambridge, who gradua,t¢ from Su«olk~aw School this year, is-a_c_ase
in:point. He t rne down law firm offers to work
instead for IBM's legal department in Armonk,

N.Y.
.

'

· : "I chose it because I can avoid the usual twoy~ar apprenticeship at a law firm, will get business exposure and will be paid competitively
\Vl.th New York firms," Walsh said.
'

'

: ; Catalyst Legal Resources Inc., a, New Yorkfaised legal recruiting firm, recentl)( surveyed
s,.tarting lawyer salaries in IO cities, including
~ston. Because of the recession, said Catalyst's
James Pantaleo, first-yea,r sala,ries are up 9 per~
(!ent or 10 percent instead of the 12 percent or
l5. percent of pa.st years.
: According to the survey, Boston firms with

in.ore than 100 lawyers are paying about
$35,000 to new associates this fall, while busi-·
l'l~sses pay new lawyers about $28,000, and gover:nmelJ,,t;/a\)out $21.000. Law salaries cfrop
l)iarkedly wltti the size of the firm, however,
1ith' firms of under 20 lawyers offering new assqctat~s $25,000 to $28,000.
'.
.
r,. In addition to new salary increases, large
~oston law firms_.are also continuing to expand
t,his fall, ,the traditional season for bringing new
a~sociates aboard, .Gaston Snow is taking on 25
l)ew lawyers: Goodwin Proctor & Hoar, 18;
~¢pes & Gray, 20; .Hale & Doar, 28.
: .. But at the same time law partners are lookii\g closely at new economic strategies. Several
l~).vyers said their firms are relying increasingly
on paralegals for basic legal tasks and cutting
t:>ack on travel with increased use of automation
~Rd telecommunications.
~
, ; Attorney, Repola said Gaston Snow. is alsc
ta,;king a look at-its pay scale. "What we're try
. ipJi,t9.,J~O ,is not re'.Ya~d the new people as mud
...~~ we ~an,reward'some of the older ones," ht
said.
,t

. \

HYDE PARKJMATTAP'ffl
TRIBUNE u:i{:C "
HYDE PARK. mo.
Wo 5.300

JAMAlr.A PLAIN CITIZEN
AND ROXBURY CITIZEN
HYDE PARK, MA.
W. 4,800

NOV 2 5 1982
()

I

:d

I

/ ,:

BOSTON SUNDAY GLOB.E
COSTON, MA
S 605,339

Tess's thought for today: "Newspapers are the schoolmasters of the
common people." (Harriet Beecher
Stowe) ·

********

Committee of the Greater Bostm
Real Estate Board. The Committee i:
compri!3ed of real estate leader:
from severaL commuitities in th1
Greater Boston area.


*i****** I
Stork market report: Mr. and Mrs.
IN THE SERVICE: Gregory S.
John Ruscito, Hyde Park, are the
Tapb, son of Catherine and William
parents of their first child, Maria
Tal;>b of Blake StreefHyde Park, has
Grazia, born November 12 at Beth
been promoted in the It.s. Air Force
Israel Hospital. Grandparents of the
to the rank of airman first class. He
new arrival are, Mr. and Mrs.
Donato Oddi of Wellesley and Mr. · i& a 1979 graduate of English High
'
·
School.
and Mrs. Sossio Ruscito of PontePv~ Thomas Civit&rese, son of
corvo, Italy. Great-grandmother is
Joseph and Lena Civitarese of Hyde
Mrs. Mary Franciosa of Revere.
Park, has completed one station unit
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Graham,
training at the U.S. Army -Infantry
Jr., of Dorchester, are the parents of
Sc;:~ool, Fort Benning, Ga. He is a
a daughter, Christine Marie, born
1976 graduate of Hyde Park High
November 8 at St. Margaret's
School.
·
Hospital for Women in Dorchester.
Army National Guard Pvt. James
Grandparents of the new arrival
A. MacVarish, son ofDonald G. Macare, Mr. and Mrs. John R. Griffin of
Varsih of Dorchester and Dorothy
Dorchester and Mrs.- and Mrs.
MacVarish of South Boston, has
Stephen J. Graham, also of Dorchescompleted a wheeled-vehicle
ter.
mechanic course at the U.S. Army
********
Training Center, Fort Jackson, S.C.
That very nice gentleman, Arthur
The pi:ivate is a 1979 graduate of
Anderson of Hyde Park, will dediSouth BostOH High School.
cate a tree in qiemory of his parents,
Airman'George Stephatos, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Anderson, on
Kostantinos and-Alice Stephatos of.
November 26 at .7:00 p.m. in Logan
Dorchester, has been assigned to
Square. If some of our readers are
Sheppard Air .Force Base, Texas, )
surprised, upon attending the dediaft~r. completing Air Force basic /
cation, at the rapid growth of the
trammg. Stephatos i3 a 1978 gratree which was pictured in last
duate of Karlovasi High School,
week's Tribune, it wasn't magic that
Greece.
made the tree taller, it's a different
********
tree. Rumor has it that there. was
The .
Dedham Choral Society under
quite a mixup with the original purthe direction of Brian Jones presents
chase and the subsequent re-puras its 29th annual Christmas Concert
chase of the tree. The trouble is, no
two performances of Christmas Ora:Jnc is talking.
'
torio (Parts ! & I!) by Johann SeDave Ziemba, of Jamaica Plain,
bastian Bach, and selections from
program co-ordinator of Jamaica
the Coronation Anthems by George
Plain High and Agassiz Community
Frid~ric Handel, along with' tradiSchools, and his wife, Laura, are the
tional carols. The 150 voice chorus
parents of a new daughter, Kathryn _will be accompanied by orchestra.
Lee, born November 12 at Beth
Soloists are Natalie Moechel, mezzoIsrael Hospital.
soprano; Kyle Bradford, tenor; San********
ford Sylvan, bass; and Judith PlotArea students who were named to
ner, soprano. Performances will be
the honor list at Boston Technical
held on Sunday, December 5 at 3:00
High School ar1e: from Jamaica Plain,
p.m. and Sunc~ay, December 12 at
James Foster, David Colon, Osmond
3:00 p.m. at SL Mary's Church, 420
Findlay, Carla Johnson. Bernard Gil- High Street, Dedham. General adbert. Ines Peguero, Shawn Blaney mission is $5.00; students and senior
and John Lorusso. From Hyde Park,
citizens $3.00. For ticket information
David Slocum and Mag'alie Desire.
·
call 326-6050.
The annual winter concert of the
Five Dorchistet'residents ai:e perUMass/Boston Chorus 'will be held
forming in the world premiere of
Wednesday, December 8 and Sunday, December 12 at the Healey SIMPLICISSIMUS by Louis E.
Library Harbor Campus. The Dec. 8 Ro,berts to be presented by the
performance will bi;i at 12:30 p.m. Theatre Arts Department of
U.Mass/Boston in Theatre II of the
ainrl tho nan 1 'l -n~f................. _ ........ _.._ ,,

uCT 3 11982

recast for tne, 'BOS

~-- - - ':',l'1'.~,~VN,8ttllli~::1tti~~~~i~U~..t~;'IJ1ll,J~
~f·
~

:~,i!,~-

),/'

§fJftr:istin~ p,,"Reagle
- - - - - - ."'"·- - - - - - - - •
or~· r~ponden:t. ·
Co:nie,~JxtJune, 75,0
0
.• ~-~ltj_p~~{~ stint as_a gr,ac:luhigh school students,.
at:e.assistant or a ~ r as a.farm laboreif high schoql or co1tege teacher. farn::1er Massachusetts, are
01\ffl~~[OftQe clergy'. tllink"a ·n. Ac- . expected to graduafe-~
cgrding to'Herinis. MeSW'~,;i.e.y:;_ ·.
·al
45 perce·nt of them w1·
CG9Ilomist for the Bureau·of Labof;
..• ~ .
'
.
tics}henumber of jobs i!) those fi~c:ls wi ~-\~~ter the job market
declnie between now and 1990. ·
• ···,=
d· t J
iCome• ri:exf tJun~.;75.QQp. ·llighi 5-chool
Imme .1_a e Y
stqdents in Massachusetts 'are,e!~t~: •.. - - - - - - - - - - - - - to graduate and 45 percent of thegi wilf
· ,,
enter the job market immediately, ac_cord- Bureiu, there will~ be. IDOie people a
ing to a spokesman for the Massa'chu- to need legl:!,]Jii!p'tsM~w~ney citei
1
s~tts. Department of Education:
of the reason for the 'Ifugi!:Jwn1t l
.
With national · unemployment scales need for para~eg~l a9y,1.s~rs as a rei
tipping 10.1 percent fast i:nonth and the more companies incorporating leg
Massachuse.tts figure at 7.2 percent vice as a fringe benefit')n compan:
pragmaUsril tnay be gaining as a factor in tracts.
... · ·.
cl:loosing a job field.
.
·
"There ·is no degr~\required -ti
. So. whether you willbe a new gradu- paralegal advice. Most students wil
ate or are planning a job change.- tl\lere is a BA in liberal arts. '¥.hitlaw firn
a)pright ~ide if you give seri9µs cc)rlsider- · · looking for is a graduate\from a ~
ation to becoming a ·paraJegal, a dat~ pro" · liberal arts 'college .• Basica1il.y,, · you
c~sing maclline mechanic, a hospitla:l or- need tra:ining;' you r:eceive it on th
d~rly: a secretary or. a cqmputer-gp~rktor. · Th_is makes if appealing for recently
;,;;".;Wl;J~ are the job ar~s projected t~ Un-: · · uated students.,·· said Marjorie O'Do
d~fgo'Jhe IIlOSt significant growth fot the director of admissions~ for Suffolk
re,st ofthis;decade,"c in otllerwotds, tlley . School in Boston. '
.
,-ffl!-!.;:!!~J;t :!.1:1~ ~os,t jqbs, ~yailable 1a~d . If that .~oesn't pique your intere
w¥;WJ,gJo',~J, ' .' ' Q..1,l~lififo.-sworkers; . . per<:ent mote dafa processing ma
)'iJJ~f-~xa.,m:p~'.i" • ,_ p~~~fe$51Q'Il§.' . inechanics,are~~fJ~.tp be need,
ar;e·expect¢ to gi::o\Y,, by _ 09" 1'.!e_rce1it~:x, ".f<laµ~; <Jf ;growth in eomputer-rela~
l
1990. Because tfie pbpulatio.q ,~ .~x'pt!9te!i · >: qustries. Growth in the field of l
to'..tnc.rease front''now until 'at least-.tlle care is creating a great deman
year 2000: according to. the US. Cerisus . nurses' a'idesa:nd orderlies - 508,00

tf;rrt

0

C

• -

- --r---,.• J•

-&.t...£&.J.UJ.J.J.,

Jr., of Dorchester, are the parents of
a daughter, Christine Mai:ie, born
November 8 at St. Margaret's
Hospital for Women in Dorchester.
Grandparents of the new arrival
are, Mr. and Mrs. John R. Griffin of
Dorchester and Mrs: and Mrs.
Stephen J. Graham, also of Dorchester.

********
Thatverynicegentleman,Arthur
Anderson of Hy.de Park, will dedicate a tree in n;iemory of his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Anderson, on
November 26 at .7:00 p.m. in Logan
Square. If some of our readers are
surprised, upon attending the dedication, at the rapid growth of the
tree which was pictured in last
week's Tribune, it wasn't magic that
made the tree taller, it's a different
tree. Rumor has it that there. was
quite a mixup with the original purchase and the subsequent re-purchase of the tree. The trouble is, no
::mo is talking.
'
Dave Ziemba, of Jamaica Plain,
program co-ordinator of Jamaica
Plain High and Agassiz Community
Schools, and his wtfe, Laura, are the
parents of a new daughter, Kathryn
Lee, born November 12 at Beth
Israel Hospital.

- ----- ----·
training at the U.S. Army-Infantry
S<;:hool, Fort Benning, Ga. He is a
1976 graduate of Hyde Park High
School.
Army National Guard Pvt. JameE
A. MacVarish, son ofDonald G. Mac
Varsih of Dorchester and Doroth,
MacVarish of South Boston, ha:
completed a wheeled-vehid
mechanic course at the U.S. Arm
Training Center, Fort Jackson, S.(
The PJ.:ivate is a 1979 graduate c
South Bostoa High School.
Airman' George Stephatos. son I
Kostantinos and- Alice Stephatos
Dorchester, has been assigned
Sheppard Air Force Base, Texa~
after completing Air Force basi /
training. Stephatos ;3 a 1978 gr·
duate of Karlovasi High Scho
Greece.

********

The Dedham Choral Society unc'
the direction of Brian Jones presei
as its 29th annual Christmas Cone
two performances of Christmas O
torio [Parts r & II) by Johann
bastian Bach, and selections fr
the Coronation Anthems by Geo
Frideric Handel, along with traditiona1 carols. The 150 voice chorus
will be accompanied by orchestra.
Soloists are Natalie Moechel, mezzosoprano; Kyle Bradford, tenor; San********
ford Sylvan, bass; and Judith PlotArea students who were named to
ner, soprano. Performances will be
the honor list at Boston Technical held on Sunday, December 5 at 3:00
High School a~e: from Jamaica Plain, p.m. and Sun~ay, December 12 at
James Foster, David Colon, Osmond
3:00 p.m. at SL Mary's Church, 420
Findlay, Carla Johnson. Bernard Gil- High Street, Dedham. General adbert, Ines Peguero, Shawn Blaney mission is $5.00; students and senior
and John Lorusso. From Hyde Park,
citizens $3.00. For ticket information
David Slocum and Magalie Desire.
call 326-6050.
·
The annual winter c'oncert of the
Five Dorch;ste;'i,e;idents are perUMass/Boston Chorus will be held forming in the world premiere of
Wednesday, December B and Sun- SIMPLICISSIMUS by Louis E.
day, December 12 at the Healey Ro,berts to be presented by the
Library Harbor Campus. The Dec. 8 Theatre Arts Department of
performance will b9 at 12:30 p,m. U.Mass/Boston in Theatre II of the
and the Dec. 12 performance at 2 Harbor 'campus, December 2nd
p.m. David Patterson is Chairman of ' through 12th. ·All Performances are
the music department. Thei,public is free. For further· irtfo'!'mation ·call
~vited.
.
_
'-"'€Jl~9-7720. Julw ·~A,- ~~Gendrolis,
,; Paul R. T1ern~y of Hyde Pafk. J.D. 1fa\igRter of Mr. and Mrs. John
.'.64, is a member of the comm~ttee Gendrolis, plays "Oliver." Last year
planning the annual Suffolk Uruver- Julie played one of the lead.roles in
sity Law School Alumni Dinner, THE HOSTAGE and was a membe/
which will honor the seven justices of the chorus in MEDEA. She will be
of the Massachusetts Supreme Judi-. performing in the Spring of '83 with
cial Court, on Thursday, December 9 The Boston Youth Theatre. Ms.
at the Park Plaza. 'I:he _trciditional Cheryl Ann Wilmoth, daughter of
dinner usually attracts more than Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Wilmoth will
600 alumni and friends.
appear as "The Painter." A senior
Paul Mitchell of Jamaica Plain, a at U.Mass/Boston, Cheryl performed
junior at Ohio Wesleyan University, in a student production of the
is studying in Washington, D.C. this musical Runaways last year. She has
term. Mitchell is one· of three Ohio also performed in The Me Nobody
Wesleyan students involved in-ihe Knows and Raisin In The Sun at
program. He is the scin of Mrs. Irene Emerson' College. Krystal Marble,
C. Mitchell of Pond Street.
Michael Kirwin, and Andre ElichaltAngela Acevedo, owner of all residepts of Dorchester, will also
Jamaica .Plain Real Estate, has been be performing with the SIMPLICISnamed to the Equal Opportunity SIMUS ensemble.

:h

45 percent of':-llie~

e';<ynomtst totthe Bureau'.ofLibori'~m~, .
tics.,_thenumber'ofjobsi_nthosefi¢Ji:IswiU "\~enter theJ"ob marli
d~lme between now and 1990. .
· · • ·':"-,i, . ·ct· •

:come nexf'rlune,;75,0Q.0 )Jig1tl school
lffilll€_,Jate}y
s~dtnts in Massachusetts 'fire e:kpeet'e.cL __...,.___- - - - - .
to gracfuate and 45 percent of them willenter thejoQ market immediately, a~ord- Bur~u. tfiere'Y:!1J'.be ~ore peo
ing to a spokesman for the Massachu- to need Iegi:!.l,h~!P';''M~§~eeney
setts Department of Education/
. ,
of the reason for the Ifug~JM
· With nationai·unemployment scales need for pan1Iega;I qc:Msers as
tipping 10.1 percent last month arid the more companies ·incorporatin!
Massachusetts figure at 7.2 percent; vice as a fringe benefi(in com
pragmatismmaybegainingasafactorin tracts.
,
·.
·
cl:loosing a job.field.
··
·
"There is no degr~\requiri
..' So, whether you
.be new gradu- paralegal advice. Most st\tdents
at~ or are planning a job change., tl(tere is a BA in liberal arts. Wh:it law
a{l:Sright ~ide if you giv.e setj9us cqrlsider- · looki,ng for is a gradui:ite\from
a,?ion to becoming a·para:legat a dat~ pro;:, liberal arts.· college. Basica'ily,
c~1gg machine mechanic, a llospital or- need tra:ining; you receive it 01
d~fbz;, a secretary or a cqmputer o~rator. This makes if appealing for rece:
\~\fE!¢searethejob ar6;1.s prajetMcit~ tin-: : , uated students," said Marjorie c
dfrgo the lllost significant growth for the -director of admissions~for Suf
r~t ofthis;decade,-'- in other words, U;iey School iQ Boston. ·
,~J,Z1!F~,;}-~~ )tfQs,tJ<>bs .~y~ilable 1an,:d
If that doesn't pique your inJ
~i~g,Jo~J,
a1m~5t~or~~nv _. percent more data processing
¥;,1£.f~r:e.xanip .·· '" .... _. .
J~r~fessl~D§_' mechanic~ are~-~~':t~ t? be rn
ar,e expected: to gtow: by l09;p.~rceI,1J;_!?~ 2_:,,<:;aµ~ ,()f <gfQwth in computer-re
1990. Because tfje population ,ts {xpe~tw ,:-: dustries: Growth in the field o
to)ncreas~ frmn··now until 'at
the care is ,creating a great dem
year 2000, according to. the US Census nurses' aidesa.ndorderlies - 508,

will a

least

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By~~firistine D. Reagle
·
9:l~ooi.Corr~~~<;>~de~t '
'
Come next June, 75,000
high school students_ in
; flfyou'.retn1n19~gp{.astinta~ag1,)1duate assistant or'a car~r as a farm laborer,; htgh school or coliige teach~r. farmer
Massachusetts, are_
01\ffi~l!l~.f of tl;:l~ cler:~; ._thinJ.t;a;gi~· Ac- · expected to graduate ·a]Jd
cording to Dennis_ MeSweeney,,;r~gi~pal
. . _ - . ·t -r·.:-th .
-. -. ,.
.
economist for the Bureau'.of Labof:'Stal'.18'1. . 4 5 percen · 0 . .em :Wl11
-_
tt2s ..~henumberofjobsinthoseficl,dswilf'\.:s~pJer the job markef'·.
dec_.Une betwee,n now and 1990. - i
irif:media te}y
._
·v
.
Come next Jun~.,75,QOO"high1!'/Choo_l ·
st1;.1dents in Massachusetts are, expect~
to.'grac:luate and 45 percent of the~ will
-'
enter the Job market immediately. a~cord- Bureau, tberewm be more people around
ittg to a spokesman for the_ fylassa~hu- to need leg!!l:J1~t,p:''Mi~weeney cited part
setts Department oj Education.
·_ of the reason for the htige.<J»mP. ill the
With national· unemployment scales need for paralegaJac:lY,~~ers as ii"'resiiltof
tfpping 10.1 percent Ill.st month and the more compariie.s incorporating legal adMassachusetts figure at 7 .2 percent vice as a fringe ben:efit\fn company conpragmatism may be gaining as a fa,ctor in tracts.
._
:
cl1oosing a job field.
__
"There is no degree\required to _give
: So, whether you will .be a new graduparalegal advice. Most st\Jdents will have atr or are planning a.job change,· there ts a BA in liberal arts. What law firms are
a,Jpright ~icle-if yoµ give serjous (.:?[\Sider- looking for is a graduate\from a strong
ation to becoming a para:legal, a dat~ pro- liberal arts, college. Basically, you don't,.
ce:1,singmachine mechanic, a h.(_)spit~I or- need training; you .receive it on the Job.
d~rhf/a secretary or a computer qp"'rl3,tor. This makes it appealing for recently grad~. J:Jl'.f¢se arethejob arefis projected t~ uri-. · · uated students,,. said Marjorie O'D0 !inell,
d~fgo th<! n1ost significant growth for the director of admissions for Suffolk Law
,-- -·
rest of.this-decade, .... in other words, they School in Boston.
w,#thave '.the rnostjpbs :a.yaHable :and
If that doesn't pique your interest, 93
wi"tmi~'Zo·tfelifUl' _·· ,,qµ~lifl~d4W.Orkers: . - . ·percent more data- processing machine
;,;~~!:ex~,ii:tp : . ,p~l~!~ii'f.)rPfesBl.Ot1§,' mechanics,, are,,_rt,X.~~r~g.Jp be need~ ~
art·sexpect¢ to grpw by 109;_j:>t_rcenJ;t>Y,, :: J~~ll!3~ ;o( :grQwth m computer-relat~;J9,~ .
1990. ~au:se tiie·populatioq-ts .~jfpe~te!l < dustries. Growth in the Held of health
to increase from·now uritil ·at leasf,the care is creating a great demand for
y·e~r. 2000: -according to. the us·- Census nurses' aides and orderlies - 508,000 new

l

positions·are seen by 1990. A,nd.if;you're
-· If you _think the word "computer"
stOI scratching your head over 1~hat di- keep~ popping up, you're right Th<t need
rection'.yourli(eshouldtake,eonsiderthe for workers in computer-related indus700,000 secretarial positions that are ex- tries is expected to increase by 58 percent
pected to be available nationwide:
by 1990, __
"Neither office automation nor econ6mic
According-to tndustrlal outlook projec'..
downturns are expected to have an ad- tlons:prepared earlier this year by the Buverse impact on employment of secre- reau of Industrial Economics at the us
taries,"·accordtngto the 1982°83 "Occu~ Commerce Department: "Job.opportunl~
pational Outlook Handbook;'' which ..of- ties ,in the computer industry will expand
fersjob,d~~rip;t.iops and informaJlon on substantially in the future [but] concern_
about 250 occupations. ,''T~i;l}~~logtca~ has .arisen that the United States will not
developµients in office equipment ar:e·cer- '
'eriough qualified people 'to fill these
tain to\ continue, and they will bring positions."
.
about fyrther changes in the secretary's
And, ·perhaps as a surprise: the. buwork ertvironment.. However, automated reau predicts that 251,000 elementary
office equipment cannot substitute for school teachers will be needed. The·gain
the pe$nal qualities that are essential is attributed to the need to rt!p]ace retirto the job."
Ing teachers rather than to growth, butit
Accor1ing to M:cSweetl~)',~.JlfJiox,i~I _is a,n e11couraging note In an otherwise
growth also.l~~expected in other tecfil'lttmt~~1:'Q:leali,-piQ.t.u-rei,for those Interested in
occupat~ohs: computer operators, 72 per- ,_ · teacllintt '
cent: computei~ystems analysts, 68 per· The Jastest~growing in,dustries?
cent; off.l,j:e and register ~achine :rervi~s. " McSwet!~ey·cites medical services (not in60, per~~nt; physical therapists, 51 per- . eluding fiospitals)and - yes :.. coal mtncent; copiputer programmers, 4~ perc~nt; · trig,: each ex:pec_ted to grow by 65 percent
spee,eh Jli',ld ,hearing clinicians, 47 per- by 1990: _ _,,.
cent; -afro-astronautical engineers,._ i3 . : The · 'Occupation l Outlook Handpe~cent;;and economists, 42 percent.
'CAREER,$, Pai· 14
·
,

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BLUE HILLS TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PHOT~

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<, has
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Newsclip

look at what's hot
111\CA;;;iis> ';{ ' ·

ContJniied frBb., p.\ge 4

.
book" giv~thefollowing details concerntrrg growtll .br (\ecljpe in its 11 occupational-groupings:--'· . '<,,"', •
• Professional and technical work"ers: Includes many highly trained work-

·";ers such as scientists, engineers, medical

practitioners, teachers, entertainers, pilots and accountants. Between 1980 and
1990, employment'is expected to grow between 20 and 26 percent.
Greater efforts}n energy d(:;yelopment
ai:id industrial production will contribute
to a growing demand for scientists, engineerS and technicians, and the medical
professions are expected to grow as the
health-services industry expands. The demand for systems analysts and program, mers to further develop i;i.nd use computer
resources is projected to grow rapidly.
Not all occupations in this group have
a ~sy outlook, however. 'Efi.lployment of
secondary and college and university fac• tilty is ~~pected to decrease som~what because of declining enrollments. Other
jobs, such as lawyf"r,and architect, are expected to grow 1?Ubstantlally but will be
very competitive because they attract
many applicants.
Managers and tidmtntstrators: Ineludes workers such as bank officers and
manager&, J>µyers, credit :Q1anagers and
sejf.:e_mployec_I busin~8-~, Ol)!!rat?r.s, a11d Is
~pectert,--:itt(gfow·~t~~n }3 a,nd 21 per¥rit- by,- 1~. ~~e ,numoer·c:uf-~lf-e~~
,

:•"·~~-

ployed ·business ~anagers will continue to grow because of high demand for resi- manufacturing industries. The projected.
to decline as large corporations and chain dential construction and business invest- slow growth of some manufacturing Inoperations·dominate many areas of bus!- ment in new plants before 1990.
_
dustries, along with improved production
ness. However, sniall .busfnesses such as
In contrast. the long:run employment processes, will hold. down the demand for,
quick-service groceries and fast-food res- decline in the railroad industry will con- many of these work_ers. Employment of
taurants still will prov\de opportunities Unue, and advances in printing technol- textile operat~ves, for example, .is expectfor self-employment.
·
··
ogy will offer ver.y little growth in the ed to decline as more. machinery is used
Clerical workers: The largest occupa- printing crafts.
;,
(n the textile industry.
.
tional group, including bank tellers,.
Operatives except transport: Includes
Transport operatives: Includes work- ·
bookkeepers and accounting clerks, cash- production workers such as assemblers, ers who drive buses, trucks, taxis and
iers, secretaries and typists. Expected to production painters and welders. Expect- forklifts, as well as parking. attendants
grow betw~n 19 and i1percentby 1990. ed to grow between 14 and 23 percent.
and sailors. Expected to grow between 18
Exception.s;JQgrowth in this group.are
Employmentfo. this group is tied close- and 26 percent.
... stenographers, \eypunch operators, and ly to the production of goods, because
Employme,nt in inost of th se occupaairline re~ro,;ij,tion··!lnd ticket agents - oc- most of these workers are employed in
CUpati00.S~tha,"t''aJ:~0
e1fpected to decline aS Ir--:::---..,..----,---=====-====:-,;;;
improved tethnology' reduces the need for
workers..,
..
Sales workers: Employed primarily by
retail stores, manufacturing an_(! wholesale firms. insurance companies and real
estate agencies. Expected to grow between 19'and 28 perceqt.
Much of this growth\ will be due to expansion in the retail; trade industry,
-which employs half of t~ese workers.
Craft workers: Includes a variety of
· highly skilled workers, such ,as carpenters, tool-and-die makers, instrument These students are studing a model used in their ai~hitectural training course.
BLUE HILLS ·TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PHOTO
makers, all-round machinists, electrlcians and automobile mechanics. Expected to Increase from 18 to 27 percent.
Employment in many craft occupatlons Is Ued to trerids in .a particular in_,!!11Stry. ~9'J>loym!!riHn ,11early all con-.,.struction':trades, for instance, Is expected

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/.has
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mation

tions will increase because of greater use
of most types of transportation equip·
ment, but some occupations, such as 'bus
driver and sailor, will grow only slowly.
Laborers: Includes workers such as
garbage collectors, construction laborers
and freight and stock handlers. Expected
to grow between 14 and22 percent.
Employment in this group is expected
to grow slowly as machinery increasingly
replaces manual labor.
Private household service workers:

Includes housekeepers, child.care workers. maids and servants. Expected to remain about the same.
·
Although demand for ma;ds and other
household workers should Tise as more
women work outside' the home and personal income rises, fewer people are expected to seek· these jobs. because of the
low wages. lack of advancement opportunities and low social status. associated
with the work.
Ser.vice workers: Includes a wide
range of worke~s - firefighter~; Janitors,
cosmetologists 'and . bartertd~ts· among ·,
them._ Expected to grow between :24 a,rid
32 percent.
. ·.
.. · · · · · ; ·
This is. the fastist gr:~win' ocf~Jpation·
al group. Factors expected to increase the
need for these workers are·the:risinfdemand. for health services as the population becomes older and - ·as incomes rise
- more frequent use of restaurants. beau-

'

ty salons and leisure services.
. Farm workers: ·Includes farmers and
farm managers and well as farm laborers. Expected to decline from 1O to 18 percent.
Employment of these workers has.declined for decades as farm productivity
has increased as a result of fewer but
larger farms, the use of more efficient machinery and the development of new
feeds, fertilizers and pesticides.

'

0

When considering a job or ca'i-eer,
you 're bound to"wonder about salaries.
· According to the. latest Colleg~ Placement Council national report, issued in
.July and rovering the period from Sept. 1,
1981, to June 11. 1982. college graduates
of the class of 1982 led the way ":'.JtfLan
average starting salary of$30.468 if they
took a job as a petroleum engineer.
· Coming in second among 1982 graduates of four-year degree ,programs were
chemical engineers. Job offers made to
them,carried an averageannual salary of
$27,072.
· . Among the business specialties, ac-·
counting majors drew the top average sal- . These students are studing a model used in their ar~hitectural training course.
·
BLUE HILLS ·TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PHOTO
ary offer: $18,540.
.
,
·And as for computer scientists. those
newly trained were offered an average
' $22,890.
The report is based on offers by company recruiters visiting placement offices
at 161 colleges and universiUes...
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by Linda Huckins

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a s1gmncant arop from the 'I centage of graduates who pasSed the Jul
record high in 1.980 when over 90 percent of I exam broke down as follows: Harvard le
the applicants successfully completed the t the ,;iercentages with, ~5 percent of its f
two-day exam.
applicants who passed; following Harvar
Alt)lough national comparative figures was Boston Unjversity which had 15.9 gradt
were unavailable at press time, sources ates take the exam, of whom 91.1 percen
contacted by Lawyers Weekly expressed the ! passed; Boston College had i63 representa
view that Massachusetts may, in fact, come 1, tives at the July exam and 85~2 percen
out on the high side in terms of the \ passed; Suffolk had the largest group of ap
percentage-pass rate when compared to plicants taking the exam with ·351 of whorr
other states. _
78.9 percent were successful; New England'i
For first-time takers of the· exam; which
CSee'oaqe'l.6
i,a,3=u,. clllu

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-

The old College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences library in the Archer building
has a new look, a new purpose, and a
new name.
The E. Albert Pallot Law Library, named
for a 1932 Suffolk Law School graduate
and founder of the Biscayne Federal
Savings and Loan Association in Miami,
will be dedicated Oct. 21. A Law School
1932 Class reunion will immediately fol·
low the ceremony.
The Pallot Library, which is adjacent to
the Law School's Stephen P. Mugar
Library, will contain a basic collection of
citation material, including all high court
decisions as w~II as legal encyclopedias.
It will also house three faculty-student
conference rooms containing multi·
media and video equipment and microform .
"None of the tnaterlals will be allowed
to circulate," said Law Librarian Edward
Bander. "This will guarantee that cases
will be there when students need them."
The Pallot Library will serve faculty,
students and alumni of Suffolk Law
School . only, and a door monitor is
planned to make sure that only authorized persons enter and that no library
materials leave.
Entrance fo the new library is from the
fourth floor of the Donahue building. It
incorporates about 65% of its former
space and seats approximately 200 per·
sons. The main floor of the library is a
reading room with a mezzanine above.
Pallot, who will be attending the dedication, was a Miami assistant attorney

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ca

Atty. E. Albert Pallot for whom the
library was named.•
general and the senior partner in the
Miami-based law firm of Pallot, Poppell,
Goodman and Slotnick. He also has lee·
tured at the University of Miami Law
School and has served on a number of
boards in the banking field.
Always interested in community work,
Pallet founded the Mt Sinai Hospital and
Medical Center in Miami Beach, was also
founder and first vice chairman of the
Pananicolaou Cancer Research Institute
of Miami, Inc., and is a member of President Reagan's Committee on Employ·
ment of the Handicapped "
According to President Daniel Perlman, Pallet gave a contribution to the law
school.

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Thenumbers::p-eup-butthepercentageis
dowti:
In tlµs case, the numbers refer to the total
number of. would-be lawyers who took the
July, 1982, bar examination. The percentage
reflects the number of would-be lawyers who
were successful.
ThetotalnumberofapplicantsfortheJuly
exam this year was 1,694, up somewhat.over
last year
l75'1norethan'the 1980 figure of
1,519.
.
.. ,
· But perhaps of greater interest is the fact
thatthepercentageofapplicantswhopa.ssed
the exam this year tallied oµt at 76.3 percent,
which reflects a drop over last figure year's
percentage of approximately 84 percent who
passed, and a significant drop from the
record high in 1980 when over 90 percent of
the appli~ants successfully completed the
two-day exam.
Alt.bough national comparative figures
were unavailable at press. time, sources
contacted by Lawyers Weekly expressed the
view that Massachusetts may, in fact, come
out on the high side in terms of the
percentage-pass rate when compared to
other states.~
For first-time tilker~ of the· exam; which

and

Old CLAS
library has

new look
by Linda Huckins

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~a,

~ r &am Perce•tage ~\ · · .
1

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The old College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences library in the Archer building
has a new look, a new purpose, and a
new name.
The E. Albert Pallot Law Library, named
for a 1932 Suffolk Law School graduate
and founder of the Biscayne Federal
Savings and Loan Association in Miami,
will be dedicated Oct. 21. A Law School
1932 Class reunion will immediatelyfol·
low. the ceremonv.

>..l.·

this y.ear nu·m··.bered·l,563, a\~·
..
passed for ~rcentage rate of , % , ~
But affecting.that Tate wereth~~ . ·r o;
repeaters;: and the figures for that grou1
break down as follows: second-tlllle taken
numbered 54, of whom Wpassed, for,a rateoJ
35.1 percent; applicantsfakin~ th'e'."*~01
the third-time numbered 34 · of -wh~L!l
passed, for a rate of 2fiA'percenf; fourthitmie
takers of the exam totaled 1~
3 of'them
passed, for a pass-rate of 25.0 percent; and
for those applicants taking the exam for the
fifth (or more) time, the number was 3.1 of
whom 2 passed, for 1a rate of 6.4 percent .
Local School Breakdown
For Massachusetts law schools, the per~ centage of graduates who passed the July
I exam broke down as follows: Harvard led
\ the percentages with;~s percent 9f its 89
f applicants who ,passed; following Harvard
was Boston Un,hrersity which liad 159 gradu. ates take the exam, of whom 91.1 percent
l passed; Boston College had i63 representa\ tives at the July exam and 85.2 percent
\ passed; Suffolk had the largest group of applicants taking the exam with 351 of whom
78.9percentweresuccessful; New England's
(See' oaite' 16)

and

MI\SSACHUSffiS

LAWYERS WEEKLY
BOSTON, MA.

w. 14,000

NeW

SEy: 1 ~ 1982

!:::!

_,,¥0/,c!
,

;,/
f''"·r.

'·1.1

" Women Lawyers: Numbers, Issues Grow-._
If you were a woman and wanted to be a lawyer ten years
ago, the statistics were not encouraging.
The percentage of women attorneys nationwide, according
lo the American Bar Foundation, was less than three percent,
and had hovered around that figure or less for decades.. And,
Massachusetts stood at 3.5 percent, even with 6 law schools at
that time. But more recent numbers suggest that women may
be gaining ground.
The percentage of women graduating from law school in
1!172, according to statistics gathered annually by the American Bar Assocaition (ABA), stood at6.9 percent. But that was
the number, ten years ago, that started to take off. By 1977,
according to the ABA, the percentage of women law school
graduates had Jumped to 22.8 percent. And by last year, 32.6
percent of total law school gra.duates were women, a five.fold
increase. A corresponding increase in the number.of ~omen
attorneys, now up to 12 percent was tallied by the National
Women's Political Caucus.
And the figures appear to signal real gains for women. Lawyers Weekly has learned by talking with women on the btmch
and at the bar that apparently, institutional prejudice agamsl
women practicmg law 1s now almost nonexistent. Women attorneys we talked with felt no direct prejudice in law school, m
law firms, or in th~ courts.
However, there are still individual hurdles, as Lawyers
Weekly discovered, including the logistics of Juggling a demanding legal career with a woman's potential roles as wife
and mother The formerly unusual sight of a pregnant attorney in court symbolizes the adjustments both women and men
must make as more women practice law. And there is still the
occasional comment ,rom an individual, who sees the woman
and not the attorney,
We talked with Nancy Gould, Suffolk County Probate Court
Third Assistant Registrar of Probate; ·Mary Allen Wilkes,
attorney with the Boston firm of Hale· and· Dorr; Roberta
·~'

-- - - - - - · - ............. "' .... ...,..,. .. b

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she did acknowledge that she had made some compro~ises.
In her early career, she wore dresses. Now she owns three
navy blue suits. "The 'Harvard MBA' suit," she laughs, "it
really works. It helps the people identify with you."
And there are occasional comments. Gould remembers
hearmg a Judge say of an attorney, "She's easy on the eye."
O_thers say that occasionally, though rarely, they note a man's
dJSComfort or a change in attitude when faced by a woman
attorney.
·

Alexander, also with her parents' encouragement, attended
Fitzsimmons, attorney with Shapiro and Petrucelly, also in
Boston; U.S. Magistrate Joyce London Alexander; Melinda Howard University and worked as a legislative assistant to the
Milberg, counsel for the Massachusetts Department of Cor- Speaker of the House in Congress. When she attended a black
(See page 16)
rection; and Susan Shepard, attorney with the Boston firm of
~
Bingham, Dana and Gould, about their experiences as women
practicing law.
J.D. DEGREES GRANTED IN MASSACHUSETTS
Ten Years Ago
The credit for the rapid increase in women practicing law
LAW SCHOOLS
appears to belong in large measure to the women's movement
1976•71
1981-82
1971·72
for poviding an atmosphere of encouragement, and role
models.Nancy Gould of the Suffolk County Probate Court says
778
786
716
Boston College
that the women's movement encouraged women to become
250·32°to 329-42°,<,
123-17%
Women - percent
lawyers, whereas before, women just didn't think of it as a
career. It took extraordimiry effort or encouragement to - ·
1,536
1,369
1,206
Boston University
choose law, prior to the 1970's. Gould says in her own case her
228-19% 402-29% 543-35%
Women - percent
family encouraged her plans. "In my family, it wasn't di- ,
vided, the boys did this and the girls did this." Gould was one of 1
1,821
1,787
1,797
Harvard
six women to graduate from Suffolk University Law School m
213-12% 433-24% 526-29%
1966.
Women - percent
Mary Allen Wilkes, of Hai(' and Dorr, remembers that after
913
1,055
674
New En&land School of Law
fimshing college, she talked about going to law school, but was
actively discouraged. "l was told I wouldn't get a job, I was
58-9% 215-24% 341-32%
Women - percent
told I would only get probate~ work or family stuff, or that I ~-406
would be a librarian. I wanted to be a trial lawyer!" Wilkes
273
446
Northeastern U.
chose a career in computer prngram design. But after 12 years
123-45% 214-53% 254-57%
_____Women - percent
..
and havmg achieved a level Qf success in the field, Wilkes ,
decided she would go to law school, and graduated from Har1,721
1,671
2,148
Suffolk University
vard in 1975.
195-9% 533-31% 664-40%
Women - percent
..
Magistrate Joyce Alexander, one of six black femnle federal
judges, notes that prior to ten years ago, there were not as
794
912
Western New En&land
many opportunities for women to ·enter law school. ConseSchool of Law
QIJl.1.0tlY, role models, older successful women at bench and
216-27% 312.31 !'Women • percent
bar, were at a minimum. In Ale~ander's own experience, the
presence of role models opened the way to her choice of
~

_

Source: A~A Division of Legal Education and Admissions to the Blr

career.

wnn r nzs1mmons cnat 1t reauy aoesn-t maKe a muerence
_Wilk.es r~calls the s~ory ofCo:1stance Baker Motley, a
D1sctnct Court J~dg~ 1~ Ne:-V York, who was hearing a case of
purported se~ d1scrimma.tion against a large law firm. The
defendants .~iled a motion rnquesting ber to disqualify
herself-because she was a woman. Motley noted that regardless of w~~ther she disqualified qerself, "The judge will
be of one sex. She heard the case. ,
Career Cons.lderatlons
For Susan Shepard, attorney with the Boston firm of Bin.

U.S..



-

,1 . ,r

says Muoerg, current president, by about 2.5 attorneys who
felt they would like to act as advocates for women's issues.
Membership 1s now about 500. The WBA actively seeks the
~dvancement ?f women Judges and women to executive posts.
1 he ~rgamzatmn has lobbied for or against various bills in- ,..
cJudmg t~e r.ape staircasing bill, and filed amicus briefs 10
cases which mvolved women's rights. In a particularly sue- ~
ces~ful proJect, says Milberg, the WBA has worked with the
·
National Lawyer's Guild to develop training materials for
~
lawyers who represent minors seeking abortions.

Lawyers: Numbers, Issues ~ro~~

(Continued!\>m page 14)
college, "with women and men from diveriie backgrounds,
whose parents were professionals," Alexander realized for
the first time "there were hundreds of black lawyers practicmg around the country." Alexander graduated from the New
England School of Law in 197'..!.
As one of two black female Federal magistrates in the U.S.
and one of three black woinen judges in Massachusetts, Alexander is conscious of her position as role model. "Now, with
the increase in minority women in the law, young minority
women see thatthere is a possibility, a probability," of Joining
the profession, says Alexander. But the real importance, she
says, i&not a token representation of minorities and women on
the bench. "Hopefully, I'm not only a role model," says Alexander. "If there is any significance to a woman's appointment, it is that more numbers must follow. Our appointments
have no effect unless more women are appointed."
But by the time Melissa Milberg, counsel for the Massachustitts Department of Correction, graduated from Brandeis
m 1974 and Boston University Law School m 1977, she did not
feel any institutional prejudice, and very little difficulty m
finding a Job. "My mother told me when I was seven or eight
that I would make a good lawyer," says Milberg, who pursued
the career wi~hout interruption.
The Difference
So there was a road to travel for women who chose law as a
career. Women still face the occasional subtle difference between bemg identified as a woman attorney and being identified as an attorney
Gould remembers looking for a job in the early seventies.
Gould, blonde, found "they expected you to look like a severe
Barbara Stanwyck, hair pulled back. lf you were attractive,
they didn't take you seriously as an attorney. But that's
changed now. I would say to women today, don't lose your
femmmity." Gould declined to define what she meant by
femmmity, "it means something different to everyone," but
she did acknowledge that she had made some compromises.
In her early career, she wore dresses. Now she owns three
navy blue suits. "The 'Harvard MBA' suit," she laughs, "it
really works. It helps the people identify with you."
And there are occasional comments. Gould remembers
hearmg a Judge say of an attorney, "She's easy on the eye."
Others say that occasionally, though rarely, they note a man's
discomfort or a change in attitude when faced ~y a woman
attorney.

Does It Matter
gham, Dana and Gould, how. to combine the demands of a
The question inevitably arises, has the presence of more career and a family should nyw concern an mtegrated legal
female attorneys meant a change in the practice of law'? The profession. Shepard, who ut pregnant, suspects that the
answer seems to be yes and no. Some ofthe women agreed that majority of women attorneys have spouses who work, but that
the practice superficially is different. But women trial attor- the maJority of men attorneys have spouses who don't work or
neys say that being a woman 1s Just another factor. Wilkes can afford not to work. Shepard asks whether a woman who
points out that for trial attorneys, the practice "is very much a works 40 hours a week while her peers are working 60 hours a
matter of personal style. You cannot imitate another lawyer, week, because she has the responsibility of day care
it Just doesn't work. If you're a woman," says Wilkes, "it's arrangements, should be considered less committed? Firms
mcluded as a component of who you are" in the courtroom. might also have to recognize part-time employment as bemg
There are male attorneys who have, for example, an in- equally as committed as full-time. Shepard says that most law
credible stage presence," says Roberta Fitzsimmons, of firms are dealing with such questions on an individual basts,
Shapiro and Petrucelly, an association of seven attorneys. ."and that may be a good thing, for now ''
"There are attorneys who know how to use body language,
One statistic quoted by National Association of Women
whoknowallthetheoriesonJurorsandknowhowtoplaytothe Judges spokeswoman Judge Margaret Taylor, of the New
box. Sure being a woman makes a difference, being pregnant York City Civil Court, indicated that 3 percent of the married
may make a difference-but so what? Everything makes a male Judges surveyed did not have children, but that 18 perdifference, even whether a man has distinguished-looking cent of the married female judges surveyed had no children.
grey temples. It all matters."
Taylor suggests that women, and the profession, have to be
As for appearing before a woman judge, only one of the
women Lawyers Weekly talked with felt that women attor- aware of the careerfamily choices.
Women's Organizations
neys might "get a break" when appearing before a female
There are two organizations for women attorneys in MassaJudge. Gould says she has seen a woman judge help along a
floundering woman attorney in court. Fitzsimmons says, chusetts to share their concerns. The Massachusetts Associahowever, that while she feels an unspoken connection, as if the tion of Women Lawyers (MA WL) is celebrating its 76th year.
woman Judge may be pleased to see a woman m practice, MA WL was initially a social organization for women, says
Jt~itzsimmons also feels that the judge "is interested to see how Gould, a former president, but in the last 20 years it has develyou handle your case, and is much more demanding that you oped an educational focus. "Our primary purpose is to give
know your stuff. But it's very subtle, and in fact I don't think it inexpensive but meaningful lectures, semmars, and 111! day
makes a difference."
sessions, to keep women attorneys current," says Gould. "We
Wilkes says that superficially, she feels a difference when get the best m their fields in Massachusetts to come." The
appearing before a woman Judge. "I suppose it's due to the seminars have ranged from becommg a judge to dressing for
fact that for on~e. I'm probably enjoying being in the maJor- success. The organization has between 600 and 700 members,
ity,"thatis,theJudgeandfemaleattorneymakingamaJority says Gould.
over the opposing male attorney. However, Wilkes agrees
The Women's Bar Association was formed four years ago,
with Fitzsimmons that it really doesn't make a difference.
says Milberg, current president, by about 25 attorneys who
Wilkes recalls the story of Co:1stance Baker Motley, a U.S.. felt they would like to act as advocates for women's issues.
Disctrict Court Judge in New York, wno was hearing a case of Membership is now about 500. The WBA actively seeks the
purported sex discrimination against a large law firm. The advancement of women Judges and women to executive posts.
defendants filed a motion rnquestjng her to disqualify The organization has lobbied for or against various bills, inherself--because she was a woman. Motley noted that re- cluding the rape staircasing bill, and filed amicus briefs in
gardless of whether she disqualified herself, "The Judge will cases which mvolved women's rights. In a particularly sucbe of one sex." She heard the case. ,
cessful project, says Milberg, the WBA has worked with the
National Lawyer's Guild to develop training materials for
Career Cons.ldera&Jons
For Susan Shepard, attorney with the Boston firm of Bin- lawyers who represent minors seeking abortions.

i

-

-~;I. H lj-HMB•~~b'1!!~---·~__,----··---

Suffolk Library I~edicate<l
AD £AST
BOSTON, MA.
M, 8,000

fl(.,,..

NOV

:EDl)anil

---,

Newaclitf
.~

Stone & Manning
Advertising, Inc.

1405 Statler Office Building, Boston, MA
02116. (617) 426-5275. Formed, 1963. Staff,
10. 1981 bill., $2,000,000; ant. 1982 bill.,
$3,000,000.
Pres., Warren Manning; vps, Burt
Lavine, Vivien A. Rock, Robert H. c
Jackson
.
Media, radio/tv, Mary Gillan; prod,
traff., Vivien A Rock; art, Linda D
MacGregor; pr, Will Manning.
A/S, Warren Manning, Burt Lavine;
. A/E, Robert Jackson, Will Manning.
Inc., 200Jo; csmr., 25; ind!., 65; pr, 10.
Media: NE, 150Jo; n, 15; r, 5; tp, 30; t, 5;
mag, 30; dm, 15
.
Clients incl.ude: Boston Machine Works
Co. (Lynn, MA) - industrial machinery; '
B.A. Corbin & Son Co. (Leola, PA)· youni
women's casual shoes, boots; Eagle Electric
Supply Co. (Boston) - electrical distributors;
Gould Inc ,, Electric Fuse Div.
(Newburyport, MA) , commercial & industrial fuses; Gould Inc., International
Div. (Lucerne, Switzerland) - commercial &
industrial fuses; Gould & Scammon, Inc.
(Auburn, ME) - heels & counters; Grant
Technology Systems Corp (Chelmsford,
MA) . analog 1/0 boards; The GreeneShaw Co , Inc. (Newton, MA) - electrical
distributors; ISSA (Chicago). maintenance
& sanitation supply association; Logan Air·
port Hilton (Boston) - hotel; MFE Corp~
Computer Peripherals Div. (Salem, NH) back-up memory systems; Miller, Hess &
Co., Int. (Akron, PA) - women's casual
shoes & boots; Parks Corp. (Somerset, MA)
- paint sundries; Pet Co of America
.
(Marshfield, MA) . pet products; J G Scott
Imports, Inc. (Boston) - fruit juices; Su~
• U ~ (Boston) · education; Superior
;:.:..(;P~P~u::, Inc. (Boston) - pet products;

E Albert Paitot (center), retired presideilt and chief execuU~e offker ?f the Bis·
·
F d
s · gs and. .. -an •;\ssociatkm in.Miami, Flonda, a~d wife, Honey
cayne e era1 avm
.....,
.
-•~ r~h E Albert
p n t pose beside Mr Pallot's portraitafterded1eation ceremo....,!Hl • e . ,
p!n!t'Law Library at Suffolk University. Beacon Hill, Bosto~. Looking on are (from
left) Suffolk University President Daniel H. Perlman, Da~1d J'. Sargent. dean of
Suffolk La\> School. and Edward J. Bander, Suffolk Law hbranan.

Legal Secretaries Board 1'o 1Weet
y1
~

r

Representatives of the 11 legal .secretaries
associations in Massachusetts will gather at
the Worcester Marriott Hotel on November
12-13 for the State Board of G?v~rnor: Meet~
ing of Massachusetts Association o, Legal

~t:retarie~ State presid.en~ ~!arg!~erite. A.

~~r1:~:,~; ~~~~l~~~~~~e:~~

1
~~~\

brate WCLSA's fifteenth anniversary as a
cha:oter uf MALS.
Reservations may be made by contacting
Karen Weeks, Leominster, or Gladys S Ab·
bott, 756-2475.
Monthly '..foeting Scheduled
The monthly rn2etingofthe WCLSA wiil Le
held ·ruesdf1y
16 at 7_p rn at tue

1

J

Taylor Elec.tr. ic, Inc. (~arble Falls, TX) electrical distrtbution products,


,_.,.,

.

'

•;

(\

BOSTON HERALD
BOSTON, MA
~.~1

DEC a '11982

r -1

f'd

~

. -~--

Posh, yes, bUt still the CitY

Crime is no stranger·
to Beacon Hill.
Burglaries are most
commonly cited as the
major problem, as ten, certainly' not with here for quite some. a little common sense that his own neighboripight be expected in an the frequency found in time now. I don't like · coupled with caution," hood is not immune,"
area peopled, at le~st in Roxbury and Dorches,, that it happened, ~ut it · the woman said. "No m~yoral spok~sman
.part, by monied folk. ter.
doesn't frighten me.
sense in asking for George Regan said last
with fine homes and ex·
.
. trouble.''
night. "He is hopeful
pensive, elegant fur- , "That's awful that
She was referrmg to
·
. the victim has a comnishings.
happened to that girl," a 23-year-old Allston
~ven Mayor Kevm plete and speedy recovMuggings are no sur-' said i 50-year-old worn- wto~band whdo was., fo~,!1 d .rhi~;s
Molit beVer- ery. and the case will be·
prise ,to_ res'ioents•· ei-' ari who' has Ti v~d on'' s a1:1 .e ap. rapel!l e~,1 - on ·.. Ql!le as en resolved soon."
Y
-ther. LB\.lt mbre 'vi6Jenf Mou:n'tj 'V'ernt>rl ~ Street 9'esterday .rn: th~• pa:rk;: 'brokelil. mto: · ·. ~ , ' · ' , · •1 tttink having 'the

crimes - stabbings, for 17 years. "We mg area behmd 85 1'The mayor abhors acts college students (of
rapings, murders - do haven't . had many Mount Ver.non St.
of violence anywhere in Suffolk. Univer.§.ity)
not tend to occur as of- things like that around . "You just have to use the city. an~ real.izes here· helps to make a

.'Not immune' to violence
I

C

iss

difference, because
there are people walking around all times of
the day and night," said
the owner of a posh
Loui~burg Square townhouse.
"
"You take all the precautions you can,'' he
said. "This is a lovely
place to live, and, I !or
one wouldn't trade it
for anythjQll. - Yori j{l;;t
can't 'lose sfght o[ tlie
fact that it is a part of
the city and crime does
exist."
j

BOSTON HERALD AMERICAN

BOSTON, MA

2 1HE CHROMCLE OF HIGHER EDUCA 110N

J>. 2Se..101

~Y3

1982
,.,..·.·.·

·whene.,;er' d~seussions arise con-

i-' ...

gest that-qur constituency c:>ffers·this

' cernjtlg the· future of. higher educa- · hope. The USAES is a nation-wide orl,.;t'i-on/one bright area often goes unnQ- ganization of ·adult, part-time colleg~

. ticed amid all the bleak predictions. students. At this ti~e the national
The article by Arthur Jones of -Mon- median age is 30 years old.. Our enroll·. day, April 26, ("Higher Education of ment in higher education equals (and
Future Will Have a New Outlook") is soon will surpass) the traditional fullindeed correct ...:... as far as it goes. tim~ enrollment. As more and more
Consider this, Populations continue to students find college costs beyond
decline while economic conditions con- their ability to pay, more of them will
tinue to tightert. Tenured faculty are begin their ec:lucation on a part-time
being let go and upward of 10 percent -: basis .while working part-time in a
.' '
of'today's inst_itutes of higher educa'- tight economy.
' ·tion will fall into insolvency within
.We concur with Mr. Jones' article
/ the. 'next five years. Meanwhile tui- that higher ec:lucation will S9Qn have a.
l tions continue to· rise as tuition aid new profile. But we also feeltha:t Mr.
• loans become inadequate to cover, the J9nes has overlooked the one poten·co$ts in the numbers . necessary to tial market t;hat represents the salva· ke¢p the class:rooms filled. ·
tion for higher education - the MuJt,
.
Where will our colleges and uni- part-time student.
. versities turn to find a new market to
Walter E. Michaiik
. fend off thfapotential involvency? All .
Vice-president USAES,
: IS pot lost. we of the United States
Suffolk University
: Association of Evening Students sug.
.
.....,.

.

'

The American Council on Education, announcing last week's memorial service for its late vice-president,
Stephen K. Bailey, invited "all
friends and well-wishers" to attend.

....

'

Raps choice of words
. . Referring to H.owie Carr'.s article
Gove. Street Church."
, of Ap~l 22 on· East Boston, was this
Treating these tragedies so ligh• •
• his effort of being facetious or was he
and irreverently is not our 'ide~.' of
being insensitive? ·~They're• burying
good reporting.
. .
..
F;d<iie Nastari o-gt of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church"'and ''they'll be . ·.
(Mrs.) Dorothy Des Roehers,
·
··
· pla11;t,i.11;g:;:Rr,an.k"Outditt~·ifrom':tpe ':'";'
'1" ~, LI'\

,

OORCHESTER ARGUS·
CITIZEN
HYDE PARK, MA.

w. 9,800

DEC 2 t982

···i~,'.:}~ff:lri~,\?

.;:f ',,n:~i'.:~}[ti}\)~Jl:tJJ

JAMAfCA PI.AfN cmZEN
AND ROXBURY CITIZEN
HYDE PARK, MA.
w. 4.800
-- - --.
RYDE PARK/MATfAPM
DEC
TRIBUNE
HYDE PARK MA
-- - --- 1 -~--

a

j

--

Patricia DelTorto Engag~d
To Michael O'Callaghan
Lieutenant General and Mrs. ..fil~aw SchooL She is em.ployed as a
Nicholas. J. OelTorto, of Medford, staIT assistant in the office of the
announce the engagement of their President, Suffolk ,University. Mr.
daughter, Patricia Anna, to Michael O'Callaghan receive<;!. his Bachelor of
Joseph OCallaghan, son of David and Science Degree in Accounting from
Phyllis. O'Callaghan of Dorchester. the University of Massachusett~ and
Miss QelToro received her Bachelor is a cost accountant with Standard
oLl\"r,ts. Degree in Communications Thomson Corp. in Waltham: An
from Bostcm College and is first August 13 wedding is planned.

a

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BOSTON GLOBE
BOSTON,. MA,

o...~

JUN11 t982

JEREMiAH MUR,HY
...

·Now he just
.st'ts

h°'scene at Bowdoin street and Ashburton place after ~•Capitol Police sergeant ~as
.k l>y car he was chasing. He shot and wounded one occ~pant~

;

GLOBE PHOTO BY DAN SHEEHAN

)an sh~t by Capitol policeman_

i ·,:

1:¢apitol Police sergeant shot and wounded

a: nti~h~ter man who police said ran the ser'gea4{ down with a stolen car on Beacon Hill ear_,.1
'
ly tlJJay.
, :,
,
·
- ~. Albert Webb, 49, was treated at Massachu~tts General Hospital xor injuries tci his left
leg ;1)1·.a~omen . He was later reiea:sed.
suspect, who was identified as Tirµotliy
McQ>llins, 32, of Dorchester, was reported in
good .condition today with a gunshot wound to
the tb,.est.

' · -q~e

'

.

,

with a second man in the driver's seat, accord- .
ing to ·capitol Police Sgt. Arthur Beaulieu: ·.
,
The Oldsmobiie, which had been report¢•
fl ·

stolen in Mattapan yesterday, ed tip Ash ur- ·
ton place and made an illegal left turn onto
Bowdoin street, Beaulieu said. Webb was running down Bowdoin street from the police headquarters at jhe State House. (The state buildings
and surrounding streets are under the jurisdic~
tion of Capitol Police.)
·

alone

· TEWKSBURY"".' The old man.yesterday
'afternoon wa:s nappiog in' his' bed at the Tewksbury Hospital when social worker,
. Tony Roscigno. gently put his hand on his
shoulder and said, "Hey, Jimmy, you've
'
got a-visitor." ·
, Visitors are relatively rare these days
for James Sulliya~. so he was awake in. a .
,moment and sat on the edge of his bed in
the big room with six, other beds and the
yellow tile walls. He is 7 4 years· old now
and four years ago he suffered a stroke
that partially paralyzed his right side, so
he held out his left hand to shake.
Jim Sullivan coached Somerville High
School's basketbalf team for IE! years and
led them to a remarkable 305 wins ,and 69
losses. He was an .outstanding coach in'
· the·days when the Tech Tourney was still
. held at the Boston Garden, in the days be. fore crowd vandalism prompted the tour~
nament games to ~ mClV'ed out of the Garden and back to the· high school gyms ,
. where they, really belonge,d. ' . ,· . .
~
But the. ch,~rs have}o~g ~Jpce.faded to
a. distant 'echo for.Jlm·.sollt;van; -because· stepped ciown'frtiirt' ~oa,cfling'; in 1966. :· .
.. 'and returned to his job as a house painter.
But there is a suspicion here that his
heart never really left the S<?,merville High
:gym. He had a: long run in the spotIJght,
· because he was somebody special in Som~·, ....
er'ville as. ~ong as he was cc»1ch19g their
. wjnning basket.l:iall teams: 'The~ it was
. over fqrever and then came the tough
years, ~ause he was a lifelong bachelor
. and baslcetball, the som:id 'of the crowd
and the 'satisfaction o( spotting a junior .
.V'arsity'sopllqm:ore_as a potenti~J .~iWAQ.Q.,,,1 ·
all the rest, had been the biggest part of
.
.
· · his life.
Thep everything changed. because he.
suffered a stroke and couldn't s~k and after a while the next stop was Tew}csbury i
' Hospitali~ which is a ~y:tte instttutipn c<>ntainin 99(),patients, tn.ost,of wl;lom neve.~ ,

:he

J;
/
The car ~truck Webb, pinning him against ;
, ~lice said the incident occurred.. shortly the wall of a coffee shop at the corner of Ashbur-''
afte, 'I a.m. They said a man was seen trying to ton place and ~wdoin street1 Beaulieu said. ·
br · tµto a Toyota parked outside Suffolk Uhiver 's Frank Sawyer Building at 8 Ashburton
Webb fired at least two shots from his .38
J?lac ; .
caliber serviee revolver, Beaulieu said. There
·
were two bullet holes in the windshield, one on
it11esses said a Capitol Police officer, and a the driver's sideand one on the passenger side.
Sufi tk Gniversfty police officer who wa~ ·sta- One bullet grazed the hood of the vehicle.
..
~O? .;..Inside the Sawyer. Building,. ordered the
The passenger fled on foot do~;Mt. Vernon
~ . ~.o stop.
. · ..·
·
_street toward Joy street, i'nvestfgators sai9, It
:
'lJlje man jumped into a _late-model Oldsmo- . was unknown todaywp.ether or.1?,ot the pas~n1
. tiilefr,1:hich was parked in front,of the Toyo~a, . ger was_wounded. ---·-·:____ - _·.. · .~ ,. ,
-- ... ~~lr'ii~'ffl"'T'Pllll9'ii""'IT"T!!!Tffl~rm=iltlrmrn'f'IF::1r

. ~~ ~t1f~;;s~==~!f8ld:tt~, •,
the
of'fne
·h¢2;..
diffeteqt from
•rest
patieiits;
cause for a long time he wolild not throw
in the towel. Perhaps it was a habit from
all th~ years of coachin~.,""P:fn Y?JJ h~vP

.

v10smov'.FiJ~h wa:s parked in front·, of the Toyota'
-·.----,.- J~· ..y~~ ....v

?- ,a.Lc-1uuu1::1·

,

;~J:.·

was unknowI1·toc1ay ~t.tet)i¢r'.or,~Hii;
ger was wounded.
<c, ·' ,,< · .
,---· __ I-~,_ - - __ ., -

.;._:.:_._.__:

1
.'



.

.

.----- - .-r ·- , . --··-· ..-,. .. J I

Hospital,. whicq is a-state i~tituti~n ci:m. taining 9PQ_ patients} roost of "!hoin never
: · ,watlrour"tit'tfi . ; · .· . ·•. .· .
·... · · . . e 1. e.
. . ~ut thfre w~s/~~ng;:~~t~c

ah<>1,1t~ .

-~!;et~~r~t~- ttf1;:f:th\a~:~:!1J?J,:/

cause for a long time he wotild no(thro\v
in the towel. Perhaps it was a habit from
all those years of coaching wp~n you· have
fo tell the kids that the·
'weuld com«r ,·
_ from l:x!hind in th~ last· quarter and win
the game. After awhile, Jim Sullivan apparently began to believe that h,imself. So
when he got to the big.hospital perched on ,.,
,a. small hill and surrounde(:l by lovely
.countryside, he didn't accept.that deep de" '
spair; that awful sadness, that the elderly
possess when they are exiled to ari.Jnstitu- tion, because there is no place else for .
.them to go. It's riot the hospital's fault.
Jimmy Sulllivan fought baek at first. He
could still walk, and so what if there was a
, slight limp, and the nurses would see him
walking around the grounds. He was ah
'ways a favorite with the nurses and the
•security people and the office workers, be- cause somebody would say, "Hi, Jimmy!"
and he would smile that Sullivan smile
and wave: He would not go_ to~ at night '
. but would sit near the nurses' station il'l ·
_ the first floor _ward, and during th~- day he
was in the lobby alm9St as the cin.offidal
greeter, l:x!cause he had to haye people
around him. Some guys are like'that and
we've all known them through the years.
.· ·
· ,
They need people.
, , But what finally did Jimmy in, what
eventually finished him was. he started .
leaving the' hospital grounds, walking
miles anq miles, and how he inust have
.Jpved the sights and sounds of the.
countryside, and at least once he walked
the several miles into Lowell andithe hos,pital had to send a car in to pick him up.
. i:hat's when he was grounded by the administration, and that's·when Jimmy Sul, livan began to be filled with that awful in- L.
stitutional despair.
He was limited to the ward and 'the
_nurses were directed to take away his
clothes except his bathrobe and slippers,
but the nurses couldn't do it, notto Jim,.n;iy Sullivan. That would have been toomuch. "Jimmy, you've gotta stop all that
walking!" said nurse Peg Gallagher with
make-believe severity. "Do you want td get
us all fired!" and for a few moments everything would be all right. He can ·understand perfectly, but. dammit h~ can't talk
except for a few Jumbled wQrfis, Thatd~
Jtie awful part about a stroke.
_
, The patients include 150 pomeless ,and '
, abandoned alcoholic~ The other:sai-e tll~re
- because of birth defects and auto accident
: ,injuries - or strokes. The visitors-too often
sJowly fade away after awhile here, and
when a patient dies, the hospital will notify relatives and the c1;pswer occasionally·
.
.·. ·
- is, "You bury him." "'
Jim Sullivan no longer can walk farther than the bathroom. That is wfiat he
lost while gaining that awful despair. His
- visitors have faded away except for his
two nephews. He just sits there alone and
waits., Yesterday afternoon he was wear, ing a blue and white basketball warmup
. jacket with-the monogramed words over
qis heart: "Somerville High-A Winning
Tradition."

team

<

SUNDAY SUN
LOWELL, MA,
S, 46.200

OCT 311982
------ -

Ne,t
England
Newsclip

NASHUA TELEGRAPH
NH.
___________

NASHUA,
_..__

-----

~A;,rl . . ,.;, .· . . . .
1,_~dle'sex .Diary.·
~o~
Jaa:;.~~~1,~:t::,

,.·

-------~-- --

t

.

.

Un.LERICA
McD Ou allJr
PEPPERELL
'
HOWARD Sr $20 000 non III et ux·, Lowol...vs, '$49,000, Francis
g
'
LOWELL
.
. . .'
' . ' Bank $42 800
-...
et al t.o Geil'ald Souza.
·
ON RD
345
- ~7
PAWTUCKET ID 1 '.. LAKEVIEW AVE., Lot •
BAYBERRY RD., ~8 :
B O S ~ T Inc. et
o}k·Univ.
. . BEACON ST., 672, $41,500, $17 500.
· 1225, $73,000, Marie nr ~ $20,158; TowntD1n1:,;J/J!° $61,000, Barbara
$f':'~'
E. Bos~
DavidMcArdleet'wtt.oNancy' .· JUNE ST., 17,19,• $50,000, PineDev.Corp.etal;B\nkf GeTaldSouza; we
., eontoMurielLNDai~ 128 ~nSavs Bank,$8,
·
,
Skene; .Bank of N.E. - Bay Paul Haritzis et ux to Anthony Middlesex, Burli~n, $45,TOOOONE. ST Lots.11-12-13,
TOWNSE C C 'lleyto
CARSON ST., 7, $~,oood,
State, $24,500;
.\_ ·
Pergakis; Lowell 5Savs. Bank, $340,000.
,
S
- ·t ,0 dr au to $73 125, Florence · row.
. y l nde Smith to R1char
. BOWE~ ST., 75, $46,i.OOO; .$27,900.
. .
·.
PAWTUCKET ED., $61,00~ Jenfie ie~~n':n-eau Ed~ard L. Tho~~s e60 • fuy!fHaltmark Mtge. Corp., man Will
;
Edmond Arsenault to .t'aill
LAKEVIEW AVE., $38,000, $175,000, Roger Cimonline Karen ean; enn
' 1,eominster Says.
ge.
·• · $48 000
,
h
Bo~cheretux;LowellB&TCo., RaymondDej!LisleetuxtoTho- IDev. Cori,. et al.

$51,000.
'$59,000.
EU'l ST., Lot 7, $16,500, , ave a1S
$34;000.•. · ·
mas Albeit et ux; Lowell Inst:
PA.WTtICKET BJ).,
··
Ahni'ay Davidson to Gustav ,iesofDe
.· BQYNTON ST., 81, $40,000, for Savs.1 $72,000.
$30,000, ;Enc Romano, to
TYNGSBORO
TOWNSEND.
Davidson et ux. .
·
hippie fo
.Stella Knigiit et al to Roberta i MARSHALL AVE., 59, Mark ~I!Ulnowski; Ericilla.
Nl{SHUARD., 320, $69,000, ,
·ClarlE; First Bank, $25,000.. · $.57,500, James Gill et al to nowsk1, $30,000.. .
.,.
.
.
.
· samueIShowah,etu:x to Ran, :s on tha
, B'URNHAM RD,, 178, Gregory Chenevert et ux;
PENTUCKET AV::Iil;ot
BRIDGEVIEW CIRCLE, 5,
DUDLEY RD ,.50, $62,000, daU Goldsinith et al; Comm 'pated ac
..
.$52,000, Paul Demers et ux to Comm. FS & LA, $51,750. . . 6A, $2,000; 333 AndQve\,v.· Unit l6, $44,900, Braeburn Brian L Russell to Steven D. Mtge Co· $60,850.
Mary Cote.
·
MIDDL:ll;SEX ST , 1000, Ine. et al to John Tiffany\x. Dev Corp et al to Claude Kalla· Bezansoiiet ux; Albert R,oberet
poND'ST., Lot 62, $68,00O,
B:UTLER AVE., $1,500, _$45,900,AlfredFreitasJr.etux
PENTUCKET AVEjot 'nia~;Conun.FS&LCAIR,$C3f>J00 . al s=·ooo
..
JamesCu:ttertoRa:,'Illond.BLAowJuvenal de Quadros et ux to - to Roliert; Pelletier et ux; Fidel- 6B, $2,000, 333 Ap.doyel'!v:.
'BRIDGEVIEW
Ll!i, 5,
'wobDLAND DR., Lot 11,
et ux; Revere FS. &
' endant ~
JamesZegouras.
ity Guarantee Mtge: Co., Inc'. et a_I to Evan,gehne\:Q· Unit 121 , $46,900, Braeburn
, Claire L. Leng to $20,000. _. ·
·· · . 32 promotE
··
7 o, 000 ' Al
BUTLER GARDENS, $34,400.
.
ganas.
. , · ·. · ,; De Co eta!toWilliamCros·
et ux; Wore.
ROBINHOOI) LANE,

. PINE ST., Unit 5,,$16!10, b
Comm. FS & LA, Ger~d L. Ba~S3 ooo.
$63 oOO '&ndra,McCu:dY ,to the·Flo~
$20,000, 333 Andover Dev. Inc. . MIDDLESEX ST., $2,780,
etal 'ro Michael-O'Connor.
City_ofLowell to John Cresta. Pm.e _Dev. C°Jlr.r al to \ui
50. '
,
No'. avs:
. '
··mc1'ia:rd' P1amoildon; F 1?,eh~y . awfully .i
45
_', C.AROT ST., 199, $285,000,
MIDLAND ST., 58, $43;000, De1s1~ret
;Co~elB
CARDIN AL L.A~E.
Guarantee Mtge. Co,, $55,00 ·
'Leo Lafortune Inc. et al to Pail! , Charkes McCarthy et ux to Des & T Co., $180,QOO. , L _ · 3 000 Unit 101, Cardinal
.
, .
.
· STERLIN~ RD., Lot 4 1 , Ile opini
Villeinarie et al Tr; UNB; nnis Carragher et ux; Lowell . SPRING ST., $10,o, t~v'.Cotp.etaltoSu,µPetro·
GROJON
$90;ooO, Burhngto11 Sa11.d
1atwom
,$185,000.
)
5Savs. Bank; $34,400.
Zi~os7D0w Corp.-et al to ·¥1 wicz; Comm. FS & LA1 $50,400.
Gravel Co. Inc. et al. to B &.
1
i.ix$!;>.~~ ~es~.TARBIRJ>. ST .• \:,· , FARWlL~
'$sr.,~~
~!iso~4t~
CHICOPEE ROW., 222, Holdings Inc. et al.
;erve as
. ~ , $62,500, A}exis L.MPe~~ton0 :~':, .Ronald Durand,et ux; Lowell mas Lippe; ~owell Inst. -for $Ro5g,oooRo;Roy 'lzRoear
A ~=~er ux.
. WK.s·~uRY
,
. r11ippie ,
00
. Inst. fQr Savs., $35,000. .
.
Savs., $15,000.
ert yet a; :qa.
t
MIDDLESEX ST., $41·,v, , · ux to David A. .ac . ers ,
TE . , : . . .
•r·o·m'' w··.t
1
1
:. J?AI~AX ST.,o'26, $67,000,
M'.I,'. HOPE ST., 50-52, ux, $50,000.
.
: Unit5 BraeburnDev, Corp. et Coo11BlUlkofConcord,$44,500·
,LillianMcCarthyetalExtr.to $49,900,Unitl,RKAhernCo.
SUFFOLK ST., Lot, 'ltoW~nHendersonetux;.
COMMONST.,42,$144,000,
' '• .·.
52 ' !acedne
Patrick Finneral et ux; Comm. Inc. et al to Peter Saloom et al;. $85,000, Courier Corp. et .· a omm. FS'& LN, $34,100. . . s edS.Rizvietu:xtoJosephG:
BRENTWOOD .RD.. ,
FS & LA, $60,300.
. . ,
Lowell ·Inst. for Se.vs., $39,900. Alfred Ekburg et al Tr. . ~' C OLD RD.,- Lot 43,' $15,000, ' ~erkwaz et ux; um!, $75,000. $113,000; Richard Car~o et°': 7 30 stal
. EIFTH AV.E., L'ot 32, ·- MT'. HOPE ST., 50a52,
WESTFORP ST., I;_o v Al ahder Staniunas et al to - LONGLEY lU),,.Lot 6, to Gerald Kooelsk,~()it J1X,
~0,000, James Eutize Jr. et ux $49,900, UmH, R.K Aheni Co $71,500, Frapcis Mahoney Jr(: · ~ ; Flana~; Alexander Sta~ ; $95,0oo; Frank P. Bonsavage et Comm. FS & LA,1J~ .,.,0000 protest t
to James Ste .. Marie et ux:; Inc;. et•al to Janet Langerfield; ux to LIFS_.Inc. et al. ·.
. , ,.. niuanas, $50,000.,
· ·. ux t.o Beverly L. Pendle~n et
CHARLES.D1:t., .. , "" ' 1 ' ying Wh
Lowell.h)st. for Says:; $.7,700.
Lowelkl:rist.for Savs., $39,900.
WYMAN ST, 120, ~,,oq,;>;_
·
·
ux; Conc.ord C·oop Bank, Paul femino et ux,to CbFS~ ,
FRED.A,LA,NE;59,$}6,500,
PARK AVE.- W.E.ST, 3~3AndoverDev.,Inc.etitl.f\·
.
$45,400. _
. . . GertettJr.etux; 0 om.m;.
;to the
, Rol>in lteenan· to Alexander $53,580, TBGDev:Corp.etal to Iris DeMauro et al Tr.
·.,, J
SHERBURNE; AVE.,,
OLD AYER RD., Lo\i!i LAJ,A.$8YO,SOTOO.,··S,·$69,500, Gerald 'i·e f·rom
_,_
: Keena.n · Jr;·. Robin Keen.an Bfan, Regan et al; Lowell
·.i
..
aid p d
,·0"", Unit 32, Rao Durgapra- $35,000, Create ~- Conestt~.
,$16 500
5Savs Bank $48 900
.
. . $7 > " "
F
t tux
I to John A Ma1toza ·•= Kobelski_ et.ux to DoB & '!)e8o. !elem en
,, FULTONST.,87,$45,900,
. PARK'Av'E. ·WEST,
D~CUT
:,.:\sa~1rJ1u°oa<iW~$15;ooo, nPINETRAIL,$49,Q~O,Elliot letonet~;CenturY
· '' i
El1
Louis Leakas et ux to·Stophen $53,605, Unit 6, Bldg. D, TBG
.
, . .
, · ):,Raymond Lambert et ux. to . L.aBvi!loodla·
to Ant~ny $25;000'. .
· •· · L 26 ~nge .
8
-~e~;:~t:itti~.Guaran: r::~~~~L>!~Jt15~~v~~B!~~
LAKE SH(?~ DRIVE, u,it Jo~phMcGurn. LANE, 10, MTOWNSENI)~p., $35;Q99, .. :t4,ERED1T'1.RD., ot., • ldirecto1
•• , HIL_DRETH ST., 16, $36,000.
·. .
. l,$22,400,Ph1hpShet1.toKevm . VILLAGE B b · B~ , Fl 'de. A Gilbert to Dale (C~ntittu~d- 9n Page p femal,
. \_:$31;_0_00; Be_ssie Mulvey et a.I to
.PARK A.VE. WE S'r, Lamarre et al '.l'r;,Philip Shea, $49,900, Unit ~5• Gar ara tux'; _R obri_ tson; et \ix' Fitchburg

·,·. •E7)_ · / V_ ..tnd Nor:
·..
.
·t
·
· ra1)41B e ·· o er
'
R · ert· B erub e; F irst Ban k , $53_'605 • Um 8• Bidg. D•. TBG $l2;400. · .. ·, · Lot 7,, ''dan lb Katherine Inc.1 $46,15?·- Savs).3ank,''s3·120'0• .
~_i·b
.
.
LAKEVIEW AVE.,
Coinm. Mtge.Co.
•"
~ · .. :___ .,_,,<- was statements on he
y..17,'900.
l
·
.
.
I>'ev. Corp. et al to James Shan,
·
J,
,
.
.

f' fredef1Jk"

)ll

0

~an

s

sl\t ~:

8
if!1!~

t

&!~~r!!'fa !!

jJ~·

ei

!P;;}t?·&~?~, .

Jil'~lri!J

1

· -·

,

--'sa~~t·~-i.in1;'M~ -~

~~7:e?~i~~ et al to Jofin C~ncoiq, $641000. - - -•'
OLDWESTFORDRD.,Lot3,
$80,000, Alphi Homes Inc. et al
AYER
to Gerald Loiselle et ux; Salem
·5Savs. Bank, $30,000.
$45
~~o~~ir1~l t~iI~~~i
1
Lane Jr. Comm. FS & LA, uxtoEdgarW.BrnceJr.Iletal.
S«ftoss ELL Mll.iL RD.,
$10'0h~OO, Francia Moran et ux Coveno, $46,800.
.
to J o n Tenag1· talTr·sal!l1D
1Se
;
I 5s¥°JJa:ui~ioioi:,,., !SO,
BOXBORO
Unit23A,$30~00,B&BRealty
Col"p. I nc.,...!,!t a I t O M',Itthew
CHESTER ~D,, $271500,

$l/o~ro~!W~~J~; J;

0r~f~!J;•l!_ ~i:r~

Moorreale, $110,000.
,

SHIRLEY
.
.
, ~
. LUN'ENBU:RG RD'.,
$14,200, J & ARealty Trust to
Roger
Cournoyer; Wore. No...
~vs. Bankl $50,4PO.
.·, ·
SCHOOL ST., $14,ooO; Eva, ,
Pileeki to Stephen E. Pileeki; ~
~,.$~9°0· d..
. • 1
w.nhl'IEY tw., $14,000, I.
s_te1>hen E. Longley et al to

w.

~c~~;~omm,!;_~ RaymondJ.Caccttoreetu-r:· S~p~-E.Long::~~- . . . . - ' '

~~1;;::!1a;i

'' Oµfoi her 24 yearsjn education, Ms. Whippie has to
~
be~n.in theDerry system for 14 years."Slle holds a. Boyce said he
ma.ster's degree in administration and supervision co·mpla·1'nt·, and.·B~
~
from the Vniversity of New Hampshire.
. "proper."
rr Smyrlhasbeenteachingforl3years,sixin'Derry.
1'he district's·;
ne a1 holds a mast~r's, from Suffolk University, formal answer to
SO
Boston, and has a-Certificate of Advanced Graduat.e_r-..;,_
Sfudy (for post-master's work) fromJ.Wli.. . .
.J
Afte r a length y mves t·1gat·10n, th·e EEOC·m August I
. ..
.
.
.
told Ms. Whippie that she had a right to sue the
district.
, .·
.
Inhercomplaint,Ms. Wllippiemaintainstllerehas
ri~tc~~~~e~s~e~:~~ principal in the school district

'sne points to a plan pr~pared by the School Board
, in 1976 in co11nection with the fed,eral "Title IX" anti.sex discrimination law.
In that plan, she says, "The School Board expressly
found and admitted that de facto discrimination .
exists at the administrative level in Derry."
.
"This fact should be strongly considered when the •
· n~xt vacancy occurs," she quoted the plan assaying.
."The School Board.expressed its-intent to correct
e'!:en subtle, unconscious, deeply imb.edded discrimina'tion in its hiring practices," she maintafos.
j
Yet, Ms. Whippie goes on, th,e board, fo 1,977, hired
as assistant principal at another elementary school a !
man whod!!:l not meet the.qualificationsfor the job.
. That m~h, _who is not naajed~ w~Si:>!cked over a.
QJ.1!,llified woman af(er tile qualificati0,ns )Vere
cp:~mged specifically for him, she claims. : · · ,
· ~.:,Jfhe three

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D-

NASHUA TELEGRAPH
NASHUA, NH.
D. 2&.IIOO

-"'

~
1ary:

New

NOV 1 0 1002 England
Jt..i ~ft U!!r.t, _Newsclip

rr

TYNGSBORO RD., 180, to Patrick T. Moran et wt.
Unit32F,$23,ooo,B&BRealty
'Co. Inc. efai:to Ral11.h Ki!Pat·
$113,500, Deca Uorp. et al to· rick \lt·ux:; Comm. FS 8!: LA, ·
.C.ONCORD '
Pau!Feminoetwt;Comm.FS&' $21,800.
,,
LAO $70,&_~.
. , •
·
ALCOTT RD., 23, $300;000;
' ·.NOlh.n ST., $58,500, James :··
WESTFORD
Ewan W. Fletcher to Daniel B.
~·Connors et ux: to David Cross ~t, .
«Greenberg. . ·
·
'al; Comm. Mtge Co. lpc.,
BffiCHRD.,Lot40,$70,000,,
$50,000.
.
'
DEPOT S'.1'., 31, $80,00!), Oliver·H. Woshinsky et al to
John J. CoNnell et al Extr. to Nicholl!S Dam11SSiotis.
· \
FITCHBURG TURN'PIKE,
Peter Moores et ux; Middlesex
. BURLINGTON
Savs. Bank, $60,000.

350, $200,000, John Ruze et wt
FIELDSTONE DR., Lot 11 to Paul J. Sandel'!; et ux; Coop.
, , -GARRITY RD., 21, $66,000, •. $132 ~ John Giaimo ~I\· et d Bank. of Con.cor·d., $100,000 , ; /
...
· The"'as c. Youn.\Jr. to Robert to John Jakubek et ux, Comm,
PARKLANE,183,$165,000,
'"
B k FS & LA $76 000
Edward S. Sternivk et ux to
· Kelly; Woburn· Savs; a.n •, . NONS'ET LAN'E. , 4, $72 ,900 , Kenneth D. Anderson et· ux·,
·
$45000
·
·,
.
~EE·NWOOD RD., 7', E.TraywickRealtylnc.etalto Coop Bank of Concord-,
$7;9,900, Howard•
·~i:.ac- William l'\t;e~iherJr. et ux; Old $1~~:RwsERRY
RD .• ,
Dougltll et ux to Robert D. Sad- Stone Bank, 65,600.
382, $82,000,.GladY,!! MaCOll.e to
9oo..
lereti,ix;B~ofN.E.,$75,
'
Ro.iber.t Haydock. lII; Ola.dys
ACTON
'SHEU>ON· ST., 1, $83,000,
Macone, Concordcit'""5 ,000 •
M1chael D , G'msburg et ux to
·
THOREAU 'k 'I"'
BELKNAP

HILL

Randy D. Covington et ux;
Bank/Middlesex, $67,000. Bay
WILDWOOD ST,, $75,500,
R6bert D. Anderson to Mark J;
Connaughton et ux; Leader FS
& LA '$40 000
. ,_
, ·

l

REAT RD 397 U ·t 5 STS:, $12.5.,00.0,. V·.alen.ti.·noOld ,
Re I Trus. .B.
$660000 G re. ., Blom' tonJ1ohn VCenLti toBQw&·eTt ll ty75 ·noot;
, , eomoy
o ony
· · o., $\ •"' · ' .
R; Burg; Honie Owners FS ·&
LA, $5~800. . .
.
. HIGnST.,248,$80,000,Lm· ·
. ·.
da ·Laughland to Na'ncy W.·
LITTLETON
Radar; 1st FS & LA, B~s~n.
.,
'
, .
WILMING'fON
$25 ,000.
..
,
KNOWLTON. DR., 9,
NEWTOWN RD., 486,
FED.E'RAL ST:, 197, $160,000,HenryM.Carre,tux $88000;.BarbaraD. Whitcomb
$79,5QO,WilliamBurnsetuxt9 to Hsiu Jen et wt.
·
· · to M Allen Wilde Jr. et ux; ~
..
Charles C2Chnuie et wt; ReadOLD VILLAGE RD., 31, Comm. Mtge. Co;. $61,200.
1
ing Savs. Bank, $50,000.
$154,900, William D. Morrow
·
· : ·;
TAFT,RD., Lot 187, $22,000, Jr:. et 1 ux, to 'William C. Hickeu
.
,
·
MAYN.ARD
.
Aum•utusDetatotoDavidNew•. Jr.,et ux; Comm. FS .& LA,
h
C
$123'900 ·
· ·.
·
·
9~0~t~ne am oop , wfws HOLDEN Dlt, Lot
, .. :
,
~
18A $'f65,000, TRW Inc. to\
.
' .,
· .
, rComin'Mtge.Inc $100·000. · WilhamJ.BUtl!retuxtoDavia
Ad.ela.rd. ·W C.oumo.yer et;ux;
..
~YE.SST,l·.9·&·
.11.$6.3,00~i
CHELMSFORD
·
·
·
WILLOW' ST)991 $85,000, • l\f Publicovet et al; Comm.-.FS
.
Frank BO-Coburn et ux to L &.,s · &i LA, $56,700. · ,
LEDGE RD., 30, $18,17,7, Builders Corpj Coop Bank of
M.AIN ~T., 5.5-59, Lot 4,
Alfred Guilmette et al to John Concord, $64,000.
. ,
$135,000, Linda M. Mm:eale to
Guilmette et ux.
.
·
, ·
,
•SalvatoreLandoetwt;LindaM.
OLDWESTFORDRD.,Lot3,
Moorreale, $110,000.
$80,0001 Alphi Homes Inc. et al
AYER
to Gera1d Loiselle et ux; SaleJll
·5Savs.Bank,$30,000.
NT. ST 70
, SHIRLEY
RICHARDSON RD., 8,
PLEASA .
.,
,
$48,900; David Hunt to Walter $45,000, William R. Wallace et
Lane Jr. Comm. FS & LA, uxtoEdga{W.BruceJr.Ill)tal.
. LUNENBU,RG RD\,
'
·oo
·.
MAIN
139, $58,soo, $14,200, J & A Realt. 'Trust to' ~
$44 O
RUSSELL M JI.;L RD. , Orlando Coveno et ux to Carlo Roger W. Cournoyer; W.o~. No ..
$16tlOOO, Francis Moran et wt Coveno, $46,800.
·
~VS, Bank: $50,4PO,
:, .
to John Tenaglia et al Tr; Salep:i ·
SCHO.OJJ ST.,,$14,00.0,f;va·t·•
5Savs. Bank, $100,000.
,
Pileeki to Stephen E. Pileeki;
.
BOXBORO
,.i
TYNGSBO~O RD:; 180,
UNB $14 000. . , ·
I
Uriit23A,$30.~0, B & B Realty
WHITNEY Rb., $14,000, ~
CMorp,ftilnc.,..ettall tCo Mat.tFhi:
CHESTER RD;, $271600, Stephen E. Longley et al to
.~~!!.t~Y e a ; omm.
Raym.ond J. Caccitonj. et a1 Trs. Stephen E. Longl~y. · .
.


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-Sex discrimination cl

(C · ti I d fr ' p ge
o~ nue . c:>m. a ·
:
· E6)

.a.

-- .

By STEVE SAKSON
Chairman William I
. ..
Telegraph Staff Writer
Walsh,havealsodisc,
·• CONCORD- Sandra Whippie, an assistant princ;i· activities of Derry's 1
pal in the Derry school system, has sued her bosses, Ms. Whippie insists, :
claiming they have illegally discriminated against ployees on that corn
women for six years and unjustly denied lrer a prp- participated actively
motion solely because of her sex.
: ' forts.
. Ms. Whippie, who has 2_4 years exp:rie.nce teac~- . "Defendant School
mg. ele~entary s~hool, file~. her CIVll rights co111· :and/or promote the p
pl~m! m fed~ral cour,t agamst. the Derry School cipal of the· Floyd and
D1stnct and the three male members of.th: Scho?l \vas unlawfully based
~?ard who voted to pass her ov,er fora pnpc1palsh1p lar, on the opinions of
m 1981.
.
·· .

.

Walsh that women as
She demands bac~ Pll:Y for the raise she. wo.uld men to serve as dnci
- have gotten and asksthat th,e board be forced,to give
P •
herthenextprincipaJshipwhichopensint.hedis(rict. Ms. Whippie has gc
(0l'.fy!S. Whippie is a!!5i~antp~rf1ipi:t(a'ndafeacher at support from withintht
the South Range Elen;,ientary School a.nd was one of first surfaced nearly t1
four finalists for the:principa:Iship.at the Floyd and 1
:

Qrinnell elementary schools in February 1981.
, •. Nearly 30 staff me~
Late that month the School Board , on a 3-2 vote letter of protest to the ~
hired Hood Junior High School Assi~tant Principai ,hired, saying Whippie '
·Peter Smyrl for the job.
. ·. Letters to the Schoo
Ti1e vote went along sex lines, with the three male aiso come from a for
members in the majority ancl the two women voting Grinnell elementary s
. '
"
·South Range Elertient
against Smyrl's appointment.
Four months later, Ms. Whippie filed a sex discrim- district's director of spt
ination complaint with the federal Equal Employ- · · The two female Scho
rrient Opportunity Commission, claiming she rather Yelland and Norma Sal
than Smyrl should have beert hired because she was statements on her beha
more qualified.
.. .
.
School Board membe
Out of her 24 years in education, Ms. Whippie has to comment on the suit
been in the Derry system for 14 years.'Stle l.lolds a Boyce said he ·had n1
master's degree in administration and supervision complaint, and Barka sa
from the Vniversity of New Hampshire.
"proper."
Smyrl has been te~ching for 13 years, six it'l'Derry. The district's attorm
He also holds a master's, from Suffolk Uni:versity, formal answer to the SU
Boston, and has a-Certificate of Advanced GradJ.late._r--.;,_
Study (for post-master's work) from,.UWi.
. j
After a lengthy investigation, the EEOC in August
told Ms. Whippie that she had a right to sue the
district.
·
In her c.omplaint, Ms. Whippie lllaintains there has
not beeri a femc1le principal in the school district
since at least 1966.
.
.
'
.·· She points to a plan prepared by the School Board
, in 1976 in connection with the federal "Title IX" antisex discrimination law.
'
In that plan, she says, "The School Board expressly
found and admitted that de facto discrimination .
exists at the administrative level in Derry."
.
"This fact should be strongly considered when the :
· n~xt vacancy occurs," she quoted the plan assaying. ·
."The School Board.expressed its,intent to correct
ev,en subtle, unconscious., deeply imbedded discrimination in i~ hiring practices;" she maintains.
j
Yet, Ms. Whippie goes on, tne board, in 1.977, hired
as assistant principalat another elementary school a !
man whod!d not meetthequMiticaUQnS forthejob ..
, That rriah, who is not riamed, was P!Cked over a.
q11,alified· woman. af(er. the g,ualifi~tions .,were
changed specifically for him, she claims.

~';;t~e three m a ~1mbets of the· School Board,l
~.,.

-~-

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~

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NASHUA TELEGRAPH

NASHUA, NH.
D. U.000

NOV 1 0 1982

se~ di;~;ifuination charged

.ary

1

i\

180, to Patrick T. Moran et we....

ealty

!PatLA, ·

CONCORD

'.

ALCOTl'RD., 23, $300;000;

Ewan W. Fletcher to Daniel B.
,Greenberg. , ··.
·
',
BIRCH RD., Lot 40, $70,000, 1
,000, Oliver "H. Woshinsky et al to \
tr. to Nicholas Damassiotis. .
FITCHBURG TURNPIKE,
lesex
350, $200,000, John Ruze et ux
to Paul J. Sandel'$ et ux; Coop
1t lli ·Bank of Concord, $100,000. ·•; ·
.eta
PARK LANE, 183, $165,000,
omm.
ux to '
Edward S. Sternivk
!,900, Kenneth D. Anderson et ux;
;al to CooJ) Bank of Concord-,
.
, .· .
t;Old $100,000. .
STRAWBERRY HILL RD.,
382, $82,000, GladY:s. Macone to
Robert Haydock Ill; Gladys
Macone, Concordr $35,000.
THOREAU 0t BELKNAP
STS.. , $125,000, Valentino B.
oit 5, Venti to Quiet ~alt)' Trus...t; Old
.
,John Colony B & T Co:, $75,000. ·
FS &
1

1

. ,LITTLETON
'

'

:., 9,

NEWTOWN RD., 486, ,
~t ux $68 ooo; Barbara D. Whitcomb \
to'M,_AI._len Co;,.. $61,200.
., 31, Comm. Mtge. Wi.lde J.r. et ux; ~.orrow
lickeu
'
·
c LA
·
.
MAYNARD
·•
t., Lot'
I

,

it~~ William,1.Butt!retuxtoDavi.111
HAYESST:i~&ll,$6a;D0~
o.

come

~
.

)0.

15,000, ~i Publicover et al; Comm, FS
L&,S &LA $66,700.
·
.
lnk of
MAIN ST., 55-59, Lot 4,

$135,000, Linda M. Mol'!'llale to
· •Salvatore Lando ~tux; Lmda M.
Moorreale, $110,000.

.

, SHIRLEY
., 70,
laee et
tletal.
'
58;500, 'LUNENBU,RG RD\,I ~
$14,200, J & A Realt_YTrust'to .
>Carlo Roger W. Cournoyer; Wore. No..
&,vs. Bank. $50,4PO.
,- . .
·
SCHOOL ST., ,$14,0Q.~1' Ji:Y!l' ;
Pileeki to Stephen E . .l'lleek1; ~
UNB $14000.. , ·
. ·
c
WHITNEY RD., $14,000, '
Stephen E. Lpngley et al to . ·,
Stephen E. Long1¢y. .
'

- ..__

.

...,._. . -- - .
.

By STEVE SAKSON
Chairman William Boyce, Ernest Barka and John
Telegraph Staff Writer
Walsh, have also discouraged and int~rfered with the
.. CONCORD - Sandra Whippie, ari assistant princi- activities of Derry's Title IX compliance committee,
pal in the Derry scl)ool system, has sued her bosses, Ms. Whippie insists, and have penalized School em,
claiming they have megally discriminated against ployees on that committee, including h~rself, who
. women
six years and unjustly denied her a pro- participated actively in anti-sex discrimination ef·
motion solely because of her sex.
•; f.orts. '
'
'
. Ms. Whippie, who has 2_4 years exp~rie.nce teacq:- . "Defendant School Board's decision not to hire
mg. ele~entary S~hQOI, f.ile~. her CIVIi nghts COill· and/or promote the plaintiff for the position Of prin·
pl~m! m federal cour;t agamst the Derrr School cipal of the·Floyd.and Grinnell Elementary Schools·
D1stnct and the three male members of.tn~ Scho?l ·was unlawfully based on her gender arid; iri particu~oard who voted to pass her over for. a prq1C\palsh1p lar, on the opinions of defendants Barka,,Boyce and
m 1981.
.
· .
.· . . . .
Walsh that women as a class are less qualified than
She demands bacJ{ P?Y for the raise s!}e_ wo¥ld meri to serve as pdncipals,". the suitmaintains.
have gotten and asks.that tqe board be forced.to give
· ·
~:rthene~t~ri~dpaJshiJ)wh~~h_o~~~J}n~~edis\rict.. ~.s. Whippie. h~s.gotten ~.·.~t~nifica~~~mO\l~t ot:1.;
,:i-'Ms, Wh1pp1e 1s a~~nt PO.Ff~1pl:ll.and a teacher at support from.w1thm the school system sm~e the issue ·
·
the South Range Elerp.entary,ScltooJ ·and was one of first surfaced nearly two. years ago.
four finalists for the,principalship at the Floyd and 1
...


.
. '
.
·
Grinnell elementary schools in February 1981.
, . Nearly 30 staff members at her sch90I wrote a
· Late that month the School Board; on a 3-2 vote, l~tter of p~otest t? th_e School Board a~~r Smyrl was
hired Hood Junior High School Assistant Principal hired, saymg Whippie was more qualified.
·Peter Smyrl for the job.
..
' Letters to the School Board supporting her have
Ti'le vote went along sex lines, with the t.hree male also
from a former principal at Floyd ,and
members in the majority anq the two women voting GrinneJ.I elementary schools, the principal at 'the
against Smyrl's appointment.
. '
"
South Range Elementary School, and the school·
Four months later, Ms. Whippie filed a sex discrim- district's director of special education.
ination complaint with the federal Equal Employ- ' the two female School Board members, Barbara
ment Opportunity Commission, claiming she rather Yelland and Norma Sabella, have also made public.
than Smyrl should have beeri hired because she was statements on her behalf.
'
I
mo.re qualified.
.
, ·.
.. .
,
School Board members Boyce and Barka declined
Out of her 24 years in education, Ms. Whippie has to comment on the suit this morning.
·
been in the Derry system for Hyears.'She holds a Boyce said he had not yet been served with the
master's degree in administration and supervision complaint,andBarkasaidhedidnotthinkitwouldbe
from the \Jniversity of New Hampshire.
"proper."
Smyrl has been te~ching for 13 years, six in.·Derry. T.he diStrict's attorneys have 20 days to file. a I
_
He also holds a maste.r's, from Suffolk University, formal answer to the suit. .
---(
Boston, and has a-Certificate of Advanced Graduate..~- ·
·
Study (for post-master's work) from~.
j
After a lengthy investigation, the EEOC in August
told Ms. Whippie that she had a right to sue the
district.
· ·
In her complaint, Ms. Whippie 111aintains there has
not been a female principal in the school district
·
.
·
since at least 1966.
··She points to a plan prepared by the School Board
in 1976 in connection with the federal "Title IX" anti·
.sex discrimination law. '
.
In that plan, she says, "The School Board expressly
found and admitted that de facto discrimination
exists at the administrative I.eve! in Derry."
"This fact should be strongly considered when the ·
· n~xt vacancy occurs," she quoted the plan assaying.
."The School Board.expressed its,intent to cQrrect
ev,.en Subtle, unconscious, deeply imbedded discrimin&tion in its hiring practices," she maintains.
j
Yet, Ms. Whippie goes on.the. board, in 1.977, hired
as assistant principalat another elementary school a 1
,
man who,di.d not meet thequa~ifications for the job.
, That mail, who is not riamed; was 'picked over a
qualified' woman af~er the qualificaticms _were
changed specifically for him, she claims.
. ' .
~~~ thre~ ma~~ets of the School Boa~

for

et

l,Lin:y W.
oston,

New
England

'

- ~ ~ - HYDE PARK/MATIAeM
TRIBUNE
HYDE PARK. MA

Wu 5,300.

Ne'l'!l

f £8 2 4 1983
Englan'lf
Newsclip
~ b (tt,J-,.;

Tess' thought for today: "Faith in
one's self is the foundation of
success." (Editor's Copy}
*****
Stork market report: Mr. and Mrs.
John Manzi {Lois Wallin) of Readville,
are the parents of a son, Michael
Vincent, born February 13 at St.
Margaret's Hospital. Grandparents of
the new arrival are Mr. and Mrs. Kurt
Wallin of Readville and Mrs. Clementine Manzi of New York.
Mr. and Mrs. George Kintz (Anne
Marie Byrne) of Dorchester, are the
parents of a son, Michael Edward,
born on February 11 at St. Margaret's
Hospital. Grandparents of the new
arrival are Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Byrne of Randolph and Mrs. Mary
Kintz of Dorchester.
Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Cuneo
(Brenda Johnston} of Quincy, are the
parents of a daughter, Jennifer Lynne,
born February 3 at St. Margaret's
Hospital. Grandparents of the new
arrival areMr. and Mrs. Robert L.
Johnston of Quincy and Mr. and Mrs.
John J. Cunningham of Dorchester.
Mr. and Mrs. William James
Clougher, Jr. (Barbara Marie Wyllie)
of Dorchester, are the IJ..arents of a son,
Wiliiam James Clougher III~ born
February 4 at St. Margaret's Hospital.
Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. James
L. Wyllie of Dorchester and Mr. and
Mrs. William J. Clougher, also of
Dorchester.
Mr. and Mrs. John Buckley (Linda
McIntyre) of Braintree, are the parents of a son, David Andrew, born
February 1 at St. Margaret's Hospital.
, Grandmother of the new arrival is
Mrs. Marjorie Draper of Dorchester.
Mr. and Mrs. Neal Santangelo
(Virginia McIntyre) of Dorchester, are
the parents of a daughter, Kate Elizabeth, born February 1 at St. Margaret's Hospital. Grandparents of the
new arrival are Mrs. Mary McIntyre
of Braintree and Mr. and Mrs. Renzo
Santangelo of West Roxbury.
Mr. and Mrs. Eamon McDonagh
(Barbara Burke) of Dorchester, are the
parents of a daughter, Barbara Ann,
born February 5 at St. Margaret's
Hospital. Grandparents of the new
arrival are Mr. and Mrs. Patrick
McDonagh of Galway, Ireland.
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Clancy, Jr.
(Susan Mills) of Dorchester, are the
parents of a son, Matthew Coleman,
born February 4 at St. Margaret's
Hospital in Dorchester.
*****
Captain Peter H. Turck, formerly of

Course at Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas.
Attending the ceremonies, along with
Peter's wife, Claire (Fitzpatrick) and
son, Peter Joseph, were his mother, M.
June Turck of Hyde Park and his
sister, Nancy Turck Foley of Wollaston. Captain Turck and his family,
who recently retll[ned from Germany,
purchased a new home in El Paso,
where they will live for the next three
years.
Airman Peter M. Kelly, son of Sarah
and Bartley Kelly of Dorchester, has
graduated from the U.S. Air Force
airborne radar repair course at
Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Kelly is
a graduate of Don Bosco Technical
High School.
Army Sgt. Flight L.S. DeBoer, son of
LuArta DeBoer of Dorchester, has
participated in exercise Team Spirit, a
combined U.S. and Republic of Korea
military exercise.
, Named to the Dean's List at Newbury Junior College were: Michael
Conroy, Charmain Jctmes, Muhamed
Koroma, Cassandra Lewis, Maria
Pacheco and Gina Vaughan, all of
Dorchester. Also, Josephine Dalzell
and Marie Magnus of Hyde Park.
Also, Alvin Jean-Pierre, Beatrice
Jeudy, Vita Register, Karen Sumpter
and LaTonya Williams of Mattapan.
Laura Panos of Jamaica Plain has
been named to the Merit Roll at The
Woodward School in Quincy.
Geraldine Geary of Dorchester recently completed the Executive MBA
Program at Suffolk University's
School of Management. Geary is director of medical records and quality
assurance/risk management at Carney Hospital.
* * ***
At Your Leisure: The Ninth New
England Doll, Miniature and Doll
House Show and Sale will be presented on Sunday, March 20 from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. at Danversport Yacht
Club, 161 Elliott Street, Danvers. The
show will help benefit the Handi Kids
program of Bridgewater, which provides assistance to hospitals and other
agencies by donating funds and
equipment.
Character etchings by Charles
Baldwin of Jamaica Plain will be exhibited in the Wheelock Art Gallery,
Wheelock College, Boston, from
February 25 to March 18. A reception
will be held on Friday evening, February 25 after the performance of
~h~nt~m ~! t~. Opera by th~ V:'?ee-

at Nick's Comedy Stop, 100 Warrenton street, directly behind the
Shubert Theatre. Barbutti, in the hub
direct from an engagement at Caesar's
Palace in Las Vegas, has a razor-sparp
focus on the Establishment and is a
very funny guy.
*****
The paintings and collages of two
women artists, Virginia Brennan and
Amy Singer, will be on display at the
Lillian Immig Art Gallery at Emmanuel College, 400 The Fenway, Boston, from March 7 through March 31.
A residen: ,f Dorchester, Miss Brennan received her B.A., from Emmanuel College in 1970. Miss Singer is a
graduate of Brandeis University. The
exhibit will be open to the public, free
of charge, Monday through Friday,
from 9-4. For information, call
277 -9340, ext. 261.
Five Dorchester residents were re·
cently honored at an employee service
awards reception held at the DanaFarber Cancer Institute. Recognized
for five years of service were: Lee E.
Cofran, maintenance; William L.
Gosselin, cel~rowth and re~ulation;
Mary D. Kayn~R.N., nursmg; Maxine E. Neil, development and Barbara G. Williams, clinical microbiology.

*****

Francis and James Curtis, sons of
Francis Curtis, Dorchester, have been
named to the Dean's List at Norwich
University for the fall semester.
Edward Senier, a member of the St.
Michael's College men's varsity swim
team, recently broke the school's record in the 100-meter breaststroke.
Senier, son of Edward and Regine
Sullivan of Dorchester, is considered
by swim coach Cary L. Hall as "our
most talented breaststroke swimmer."
Beverly M. Jones, sophomore,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jones
of Hyde Park, has been named to the
Dean's List at Wheaton Coillege.
Michael Belanger, Hyde Park, has
been awarded the Bachelor of Science degree from Babson College in
Wellesley.

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Kimberly Schaffner and Kathleen
j ~""' ~ = 'S>is <s ::l ~
S.

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Walsh were selected as finalists in the .§ ~ .0 ~ s:::
Emmanuel College Scholarship ~ 0 lf) i.. J ,
Competition for Women in the area of• .la . 1X1 °
Social Science. The competition was
designed to recognize academic
scholars through the completion of an
essay. The students will participate in
the scholarship comoetition intPrui<>w

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UJ.

success." (Editor's Copy}

*****

Stork market report: Mr. and Mrs.
John Manzi (Lois Wallin} of Readville,
are the parents of a son, Michael
Vincent, born February 13 at St.
Margaret's Hospital. Grandparents of
the new arrival are Mr. and Mrs. Kurt
Wallin of Readville and Mrs. Clementine Manzi of New York.
Mr. and Mrs. George Kintz (Anne
Marie Byrne) of Dorchester, are the
parents of a son, Michael Edward,
born on February 11 at St. Margaret's
Hospital. Grandparents of the new
arrival are Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Byrne of Randolph and Mrs. Mary
Kintz of Dorchester.
Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Cuneo
(Brenda Johnston) of Quincy, are the
parents of a daughter, Jennifer Lynne,
born February 3 at St. Margaret's
Hospital. Grandparents of the new
arrival areMr. and Mrs. Robert L.
Johnston of Quincy and Mr. and Mrs.
John J. Cunningham of Dorchester.
Mr. and Mrs. William James
Clougher, Jr. (Barbara Marie Wyllie)
of Dorchester, are the .!)_~rents o_f a SQll,
· William James Clougher III, born
February 4 at St. Margaret's Hospital.
Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. James
L. Wyllie of Dorchester and Mr. and
Mrs. William J. Clougher, also of
Dorchester.
Mr. and Mrs. John Buckley (Linda
McIntyre) of Braintree, are the parents of a son, David Andrew, born
February 1 at St. Margaret's Hospital.
, Grandmother of the new arrival is
Mrs. Marjorie Draper of Dorchester.
Mr. and Mrs. Neal Santangelo
[Virginia McIntyre) of Dorchester, are
the parents of a daughter, Kate Elizabeth, born February 1 at St. Margaret's Hospital. Grandparents of the
new arrival are Mrs. Mary McIntyre
of Braintree and Mr. and Mrs. Renzo
Santangelo of West Roxbury.
Mr. and Mrs. Eamon McDonagh
(Barbara Burke) of Dorchester, are the
parents of a daughter, Barbara Ann,
born February 5 at St. Margaret's
Hospital. Grandparents of the new
arrival are Mr. and Mrs. Patrick
McDonagh of Galway, Ireland.
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Clancy, Jr.
(Susan Mills) of Dorchester, are the
parents of a son, Matthew Coleman,
born February 4 at St. Margaret's
Hospital in Dorchester.

*****

Captain Peter H. Turck, formerly of
Hyde Park, graduated on February 10
from the Army Officers' Advanced

nucmumg me ceremonies, along with
Peter's wife, Claire (Fitzpatrick} and
son, Peter Joseph, were his mother, M.
June Turck of Hyde Park and his
sister, Nancy Turck Foley of Wollaston. Captain Turck and his family,
who recently rettllned from Germany,
purchased a new home in El Paso,
. where they will live for the next three
years.
Airman Peter M. Kelly, son of Sarah
and Bartley Kelly of Dorchester, has
graduated from the U.S. Air Force
airborne radar repair course at
Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Kelly is
a graduate of Don Bosco Technical
High School.
Army Sgt. Flight L.S. DeBoer, son of
LuArta DeBoer of Dorchester, has
participated in exercise Team Spirit, a
combined U.S. and Republic of Korea
military exercise.
, Named to the Dean's List at Newbury Junior College were: Michael
Conroy, Charmain Jctmes, Muhamed
Koroma, Cassandra Lewis, Maria
Pacheco and Gina Vaughan, all of
Dorchester. Also, Josephine Dalzell
and Marie Magnus of Hyde Park.
Also, Alvin Jean-Pierre. Beatrice
Jeudy, Vita Register, Karen Sumpter
and LaTonya Williams of Mattapan.
Laura Panos of Jamaica Plain has
been named to the Merit Roll at The
Woodward School in Quincy.
Geraldine Geary of Dorchester recently completed the Executive MBA
Program at Suffolk University's
School of Management. Geary is director of medical records and quality
assurance/risk management at Carney Hospital.
** ***
At Your Leisure: The Ninth New
England Doll, Miniature and Doll
House Show and Sale will be presented on Sunday, March 20 from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. at Danversport Yacht
Club, 161 Elliott Street, Danvers. The
show will help benefit the Handi Kids
program of Bridgewater, which provides assistance to hospitals and other
agencies by donating funds and
equipment.
Character etchings by Charles
Baldwin of Jamaica Plain will be exhibited in the Wheelock Art Gallery,
Wheelock College, Boston, from
February 25 to March 18. A reception
will be held on Friday evening, February 25 after the performance of
Phantom of the Opera by the Wheelock Family Theatre. Mr. Baldwin
designed the publicity art work for this
production. Callery hours are
Monday-Friday, 1,4 p.m. and
Saturday-Sunday, 2-5 p.m.
Stand-up comic-musician, Pete
Barbutti opens an exclusive sevenperformance run, March 2-6 upstairs

renton street, directly behind the
Shubert Theatre. Barbutti, in the hub
direct from an engagement at Caesar's
Palace in Las Vegas, has a razor-sparp
focus on the Establishment and is a
very funny guy.
*****
The paintings and collages of two
women artists, Virginia Brennan and
Amy Singer, will be on display at the
Lillian Immig Art Gallery at Emmanuel College, 400 The Fenway, Boston, from March 7 through March 31.
A resident >f Dorchester, Miss Brennan received her B.A., from Emmanuel College in 1970. Miss Singer is a
graduate of Brandeis University. The
exhibit will be open to the public, free
of charge, Monday through Friday,
from 9-4. For information, call
277-9340, ext. 261.
Five Dorchester residents were recently honored at an employee service
awards reception held at the DanaFarber Cancer Institute. Recognized
for five years of service were: Lee E.
Cofran, maintenance; William L.
Gosselin, cel~rowth and re~ul~tion;
Mary D. Kayn~R.N., nursmg, Maxine E. Neil, development and Barbara G. Williams, clinical microbiology.
**** *
Francis and James Curtis, sons of
Francis Curtis, Dorchester, have been
named to the Dean's List at Norwich
University for the fall semester.
Edward Senier, a member of the St.
Michael's College men's varsity swim i,.i.
ciJ -ib -o in - - ~ :0.... team, recently broke the school's re- /ell 4S 'ti"":. IS ii:: 1; - ~
cor~ in the 100-meter breaststro~e. ~ ffl 'ti ,i .c: cu iS j;! .8
Semer, son of Edward and Regme
~ a Q"
~ ~ !
Sullivan of Dorchester, is considered , cu
~ £ S j £ b- ~·
by swim coach Cary L. Hall as "our ~ .S ~ .o ~ [1 ai a: " '.52 S S
most talented breaststroke swimmer." ~ 1ii £ ,fi ~ ,8 .e, ~ i § ii
Beverly M. Jones, sophomore, :8_~ ~ 8. o -;j ~: 1:! in 13
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jones i»,e
~
::I 'B rn ~ ';
of Hyde Park, has been named to the \~ ti '00 t: ,E ,!ic1 S ~ 'al ~ ~ i;:
Dean's List at Wheaton Coillege.
'a ;
,8 c: 'tllli
Michael Belanger, Hyde Park, has !;j 111 » ~ i:: t .o fr . f .5 :0
been awarded the Bachelor of Sci- 8 ij if tU M ,a J
,a
ence degree from Babson College in 4) 0
~ ~ m ; - 13 "
Wellesley.
S 1j ! ~ cc ~- .S ;,'cs a1
.
S! o ~.s.::,S?.'z! ,.s~:;_..... 51
St. Gregory High School seniors I ..., · .! ~ ~ 5 ::s • o m'3
Kimberly Schaffner and Kathleen
j
~ as
o::, '!-'
Walsh were selected as finalists in the~, ii:: :i .in ~ C: t3 'ti _c: cc. :§
Emmanuel College Scholarship ii! 0
::, SJ'"' ~ ,
- '8
:s
Competition for Women in the area of~ CC in
I «1 .... 8
Social Science. The competition was
designed to recognize academic
scholars through the completion of an
essay. The students will participate in
the scholarship competition interview
on Saturday, February 26, and winners will be announced on Awards
Day, March 5. Awards include four
year full-tuition scholarships.

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,Board: BU
bro·ke rules
on Breakers
By Walter V. Robinson
Globe Staff
You need more than two teams and a football
to kick off at Iblton University's Nickerson
Field, at least if you plan to feed the fans, according to the Boston Licensing Board.
Hot dogs can't be sold Without a common victualer's license.
· Nor alll beer be sold without a liquor license.
The licensing board charged yesterday in a
Jetter to ·BU trustees that BU did both· without '
. proper licenses at Sunday's home opener of the
Boston Breakers football team.
The game score, 19-16)n favor of the home I
. tel;llil, will stand.
But the board also c~rged that BU didn't i
possess the entertainment license needed to .authorize the game itself. ·
I
The letter from board chairwoman Andrea j
W, Gargiulo requested BU officials to appear Friday for a hearing on the issqe.
Robert O'Rourke, a BU spokesman, said last,·
night the school wouldn't comment on the letter
until its attorneys have reviewed it. Asked
about BU's concession sales Sunday, he said:
"We were acting tn compliance with the law."
The board isn't likely to prevent the' Break- :
ers' next game at Nickerson Field April 3 .. But
sources said the board may penaUze BV by ah
lowing it to sell only 'soft drinks at that game. . ·
What ·apparently ang~ the board was
BU's decision to use its private club license, de- ·
signed for trustees and their personal guests, to
,serve 18,430 Breaker ttcketholders. Each was
gi*n a on~y club membership at the gate.
, Gargiulo, In a telephone Interview last night,
said BU "flagrantb' violated" its club license
and not out of ignorance. She• said the board
told BU at a meeting last summ~r that it
,couldn't use-tµe club lice~se for game patrons. 1

1

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DAILY TIMES &CHRO.NlCLE

SUNDAY TELEGRAM

READING, MA

WURCESTERE M

D 19,200

So .Wi'.848

AUG 25 1982

New
EJ:Rgland

AUG

Newaclip

.,,---

Reading school--& college notes
· Carole L. Smith of 24Bolton St., .a student at
Su~folk University,
wrote for the school

paper. was also in Forensic . Team and
publi~ relations, worked competed in several
at the University's of- contests.
fice and was on the

D lS,2{)0

AUG 231982

New
England
Newsclip

~;~iq.

D' Allei;~~
of 40 South St. has
transferred to Suffolk
. University and has been
workmg at the Melrose• Wak~ield H<'"'.lital tm
\.,.sum..
~

f

PATRlOI IEIGER
QUINCY.a MR
lt.IUUI

~UG 6 \982

.JAILY TIMES & CHRflNJCLE
READING,. MA

9

New
Englan!i
Newsclip

,Weymou(li

murder ',trial· gets .
~und,er.. ,wa~·-,
., •'·.·, .. ,. ,· , :· .1>?:.
.

· 'By G~ry ~.J\lat~ · , .,

,>

pJ;r;.r ~edt:!tf!:!k:i.Jt,";~ \: ;:

--

-

--.

New
England
Newsclip

,

Maurice O'Toole,
Active in Politics
For Many'Years

. Maqrice V. O'Toole, who was long active
m Democratic politics in l\fjtSSachusetts,.
died yesterday in ~is home at 205 Moreland St., .He was <14,
~
Before M retired in 1975, Mr. O'Toole
was a training officer 15 years for the
Massachusetts Department of Public
Works, Right of Way
Division. Prior to his
work at the DPW, he
had worked in the
U.S. Treasury De;.
partment.
Mr. 0 1Toole had
_ been an Internal
Mr. O'Toole
Revenue deputy collector in Framingham
from 1940 to 1951, .
~e was always active in politics and
was known as a tireless worker in the
Democratic party circles.· He was recogni~ed as ;m aggresive-and colorful c~mpa1gner: He had ~n a member of the
Common Council .and Board of Alderman.
under the old city government in the
l~~~t meniber of the_ C~tf Coundl __
For 'many years, Mr. O'Toole had
worked _on the late Sen. David I. Walsh's
· campaigns. His reward was apwintment
.AlS U.S. Department of CommerJ certifying, Qfficer for Vermont and Massachu-

~!~:,

, Weymou,th mtitd~t tria.l ·get \;mder '
:· way ,yesterd,ay iq a ·j:m,cked q>1Jrtm<:!m fi{led · with\ mtµty reJ~tiyes
· ~n!i frie?id$ of the '\'let~ w.eanpg.
. white 'ripbon ·cr0$Se~ as !ligi,.); ·~f

I ,

~!#/ .

\ Ret.tr'iaJ·for the mq~der;o(
. rett L, Lysakowsld ofW~oµth
1.· is: J~Jiles T: lmii:;, ~~ of l:$0 •
,. .
siattphotobytver~itA: Tat~eaii
~ Commercial . St;, Wey·mQuth,
Ja.mes' t~ ~ng,
trial'Jpr tfle.tmircter of'~rrett.l. Ly:sako:ws~i of . .
' 'lil)rig'i,: 11ttern¢y claµns · hi~ cHent
weymo1.1th,.s!t$ wlt~me~~•rs ofhi$ family durtng proceedings in Su,, stabbed iysakows~i. ~ sheet~me~l
·· · · ··
· ··
· ·· ·
·
• •~r!<1r C,Q11rt. •· ; - ·. :\ · · ·
, worker, in l,e.Jf-(J.efen~while',lte!\'ig
• threatened with'a hamm~r.
. ~4{.oi his hand/' Majd~ol'l, ~
-,Ru~ei;e,who ~~d ~swerecl pre-

on

t~~~~~f'~~rif,tt!~~~,~~>

-

8 1982

_"~~·a;s

se~~·l934, he managed.the successful Worcester County gubernatorial campaign of
Jam.es M. Curley.
.
. Curtey then1 appointed hjm as legal ass1s~nt Jo the ?.i!assachusetts Board of Tax
A 1 Wh th b·
ppea s. en .e oard had been reorga~i~ed,for.rner Gov. Charles F. Hurley

M~~=~~~

,-~:~!a~~~~Y(~~~~ustic:
~~f:~t~~~~:~0(~~1;n~-:_ ,
l~~n:~:i~=~tB~a:~~ new
.,MQ.ldoon satd.Jie:tb:eri~ L-~-;
phe~ m &n. U;llsteaay vmce: ~ y .
Mr. O'Toole was a staunch supporter in
kq\VSki ,Watkin~ back toward ~is,
step-brother." _
.. . .
1930 of Marcus A.'Coolidge of Fitchburg
: Pavillfon Restaurant on Washing~
, _own car. "He seemeq tt>'J:>~:wallring
Ruggere wore a ·cro~s of whit_e · who was elected U.S~ ~nator t4at year.
, ton<$tre~ (Ro'µt;_e 53) tn Wey11orm~l. but fell to \he'!. grou?d ·. • ribbon on his lapetAno'ther family
In 1940, at the Democratic state convenmqO.th. _· · . ·
. . ·. . · . , . ·
. 'A'heti he got. tcdiis ear,"Jpe _
sa1d.
member said the 'cross is a tradi~ • tion µ\ Springfield, he was the unanimous
• . I;>~i~l f; Mµldoon~ ~l. of Wey_. 'Mµlclci6n said he tl!:.~Il ~~cl.an: , tionlllfoH~h sign-ofp~ce rorn i}l
c.hoice. as conve11tion parliamentarian.
mouth, whcrwas. with Lmkowski
other:friend yell thatJ,y~owsk:1 ·
remernberance of their slai.n relaDuring that year, Mr. O'Toole was the
: the night he was l:iiJed; .sii.id sqm~
.had been stabbed.. ·- . f .
tive.
· · . · · · . · ,. · ·
New li1~gland Ar~ Supervisor of the Fed- .
•profanities were · exchanged . ~- .
}:1)ilqoon _said he ~roke a.plast!~ ·
L~ng, has been gi~en. 1>_ermi$si.on · , eral Census.
, ·.

tween his friends and the p~ople in
. w1n9,sh1eld ice ~raper oye~} Lo~g .s . to sit in the. spectator's gallery with, I~ . , l i e ~ f e ; -M11cy B:,(Paraijqte)_.. ;
l,Qrig;s ctir be(ore the. stahping; :
hracl pefore goi.ng back to whe1;e
his parents and his wife, Lynn, t O'Toole; a brother, William F. O'Toole of-,
Muldoo.n sa,id Long· got <nit of
. his frte,nd had fallen. He then ~an
who is pregnant. wjth .tpeir thi~d • Worcester; '.a sister, ·Evelyn Fl.,' wife of
.hi%<:01"with a ratlter ll'.)ng knife in
p~ck to the r~s~lll'ant to call an
child. A .1976 gi;aduate. of Wey- : Thomas W.)dartin of Worcester; and sevhi~ hand:' f!iid ·begi1n moving tp- · , aml?1,1lan_ce, he_ ~id. , - rrtouth NorthHigh School, Long is ' eral nieces an~ nephews.
·
W~rd I,yi;ako.wskf(~~ .the. knife\ 8.uggere ofwitness ,was Rol;>ert ·a shipya1;d worker,
.
, .. •·
The fiist ·
, Mr. O'Toole was born ii1 Clinton, son of
,<I t.old h1in t;o put
Weymouth,, who
w·m
dM
'p®Jn. Gaireff came up'bes1cle"fii~" : ",, fi'hoked op as he told ~ow ~
.. Juqge Ch{if}ElS R..,,.¢\lberti dis- I ·. l ,~l!,l a~ . ary (Ferguson) O'Toole and
and said, 'Watch oµt; Dan,' ar1d , identffiecl the body oJ hjs stepinisseci the jury' bJ~fore c:iefonse had. bved in Worcester most his life. He .
:pu$h¢d me.asjde." l\iftildOQn Sl;iid/
brotl'ier,, _.·
.
.• . .
- attorney Martir,t S. Cosgrove wa~W dse:ll~~?n the·tt>a.st Guard .during,
haor<t
1
: . He said. Ly,sakowski had a $h~t
,- Ruit2:ere said Lvsakowskihelped
. to · beEtin ·'cross-examininl1' Mui-

•.· tif P!lC:, 13 p.uri~g a cenf~rtJ::1!ti9n
·:i1(th,e ·naffiing lot of tnf Clljp~

MALDEN. EVENING NEWS
MAtDEN, MASS.

MEDFORD. D.AlL'l MER!lU~
MEDFORD, M.~

o.

~.1,2~J!

9,1mo
~

OCT
JRAINTREE FWMI

BRAnmttlill
w.

2,400

DEC 91982

..

5 1982

OCT

Englanil
New11cli~

5 1982

w()es tc
The

to

_..,.,.

~~Ta1k
D .
Ann Veil~, ..~"" .been
elected Studeni Govern. , ment Day representative
' from Bra_intree · High
Scboc,l." This" day is
designe,d~<to educate
·' young citizens to use state
government effectively. The program was instituted
~J, th~ legislature in 1947. Ann will attend ~gional
werks)Jops to prepare fer the April 8 pJ'9graltl. She is
secretary of the senior class and active in school
sport\-J!Ud aetivites.
·
1

0

MEDFORD -'-r
National Committee
Study
and Resolve the Problems of
Older Americans will hold·
an all-day conference oil
these'issues on Sunday, Oct.
10, - at Tufts - University's
Medford Hillside campus,
according to Dr. Edward L.
Bernays, 91, of Cambridge,
the co~itt~ chairman. ·
- The conference was
organized on the observance
th birthda f I)
~anidng, /~ide!i
of ·t.he , Massachusetts
, Association of -· Older
Arile.n.··cans., leader _of the
· .
·
New ~giand'activist aging
movement. President Jean
Mayer .of Tufts University
donated the uniyersi~'s
Medford campus facilities
to the Coµunittee.
, Purpos'e of the confereµce, according to Dr.
_ Bernays, is to malte all
Americans aware of and act
'cqnslructively on the problems of Americans over 65.
-~~s conference," said

/

Gerald Luke of Winchester; son of Marie and Guy
Luke, 45 Tingley Rd., has passed the Massachusetts
Bar. Born in Dorchester, he was graduated from
Braintree lllgh School, Northeastern University and
Suffolk University Law Schoql. He is employed by the
Federal government in Boston as a Social Security
analyst.
D
Bra,intree will be ainong 15 towns to be represented
on the panel of judges for "That's My House!", th~
neighborhood-based, home-improvement contest
sponsored by Neworld Bank, formerly Charlestown
Savings.
D

Braintree will receive $1,500 as its share of $94,748
distnbuted to 43 cities and towns to reduce the energy
consumption in 99 municipally-owned and operated
buildings by completing en~ audits and engineering studies for each of the buildings.
D
Two Braintree students have been named to the
first quarter honor roll at The Woodward School .in
Quincy. They are Lisa DITullio, Grade 12 and Kelly
Frame, Grade 6. . ,

D

.

'lbe Women's Network on the South Shore will hold
an open house to: share ideas and display original
band crafts of 30 Network women December 11 from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 41 Elmlawn Road. At 11 a.m. a
scrimshaw jewelry demonstration will be given and
at 1 p.m. decorative painting. For information call
843-2096.
D
.

The Massachusetts Society tor the Preventio~ of
Crut,iy to Children, 507 Washington St., will ~ e .
Parent Effectiveness Training available to ~ ·
~ parents beginning in January. For informa~
tion, call the MSPCC ~t 848-0110.
D
-- At . .. ,. " .... ,... Brian Donnelly's· request, ,.the
. Congressman
,.., ...
. ·-~ ....._ __ _

~·-- .

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D;.

BernaJs, ;,should help-, Brande~ University,~!
di Sp e 1 ' deep- r OOt ~ d University, Suffolk Upj1
discrimination in public .at- sity~ NQrtheastem OIUv~
titudes and. actions ag~t ty,. Tu!ts Univ~rsity.'1
older Americans that htmt .Umvers1ty of MassachUSi
U1eir opportunities, and. _(~arbor· '.C~mpm;); .
those of our country. The director of Harvard Um,
public appears ·· unaware sity's 'Institute for Learn
there are ..about 26 m,illion in Retirement and Ceil
Americans /oyer 65, -more for Lifelo11gJ.earning; .i
than the entire population of- Sen. Edward M. Kepned,y
Canada, about one o'llt of 10
The conference,, wbicll
~ericall$. In 20 ye;µ-s, it is. ·~to the public, WW.:t>e,.
estimated, 20 percent qUhe at the ~edfo~ caiµ'pQs
·
population.will be.·.·.o·v·er·_ 'nlf. 1J111vers1ty atJ·o· J. ·
..
.
65. Eight out .of 10: older witli lectul'es and .semm:
Americans are. ip .. good on problems ot µie
health and _cap~bl~ of. f9~k. by .spe~ers from. bl$~~
Yet there IS discrimination goveJ,'nment, ur,uver-s1t1
against them. Greater use of ·. and other blS.tt.tutioP$. :,
the elderly should ~ made - Among ' the . conferen
in business and the .,profes- speakers. are·: . J e.ron
sions. Contrary to general Grossman, p~idenfof .t
belie.f, only· .five ~ nt of CouJicil for a Li,vable W_orI,
..

.
~....
elderly in the U.S. are
. . . Reps. Edward. ·
.
..
senile. One in six elderly in Markey -and Barney Fran!
theU.S,livesinpoverty,due State Rep. ,Ta~ki3acklnai
to this discrimination.,, · · "' Dr, James Callanan • ,
·
·Brandeis- UJ)iversity; ti
Members of the honorary -Rev. Robert Drinail' 'I
committee include, among ·Americans for Democrat
oth~e~rs~~e-p~sid~nts of Action;· Coupc!!or ~y: Fit

w

u.s,

~!~·

the

.""°
.·.

us

0

The Chtjstmas m~ting 11)f the Philergians of Braintr~e will be December 7 at Emmanuel parish hall
begbuiing with a 1 o'clock coffee hour, with Mrs.
Cliarles Grady and Mrs. Gordon V. Sprague,
hospitality · hostess co-c:hairmen. The business
meeting at 2 p.m. will be cionducted by Mrs. Edmund
E. Quintiliani, and the Christmas musicale, featuring
Nancy Miles, harpist, will be "The Sound of Wondrous Music."

More than $1400 was raised at I
John Scott Nursing Home. The me
bus trips, entertainment and ec
would like to purchase. Residents
volunteers worked together
D

Members of Chapter 29, D.A.\
more than 1,000 D.A. V. member
who distributed gifts to patient!
Centers and to the Chelsea and
Homes on December 5.

[]

A temporary post office will be in operation at
South Shore Plaza through December 22 from U a.m.
to7p.m.
'

0
Three Braintree residents were
received dfgrees ~t the Septeml
Boston University. Susan M. Meg
Rd. received a M. Ed. from the Uni
Education. Thomas F. Banit, 300
:J , ·
received a D. Ed. from the Sch
Mary Golden, daughter of ~- and Mrs. James
Diane Minarcin, 61 Plymouth AvE
Golden, 32 Hollis Ave., has achieved second honors
from the School of Public Commw
for the first term at Montro$e. a. day school in
D
Brookline for girls in Glade 7 throtJgh ~2. She is a · "'"Eighty residents attended
ninth grader.
·
·
1· ••
· · ·
·
-Something Can Be Done" progn
1
1\
·; Btaintree Hospital and the Arthri
William T. Rowan of Braintree, vice president of
250 Pond Street. P~se was to he
Frye Insurance Agency, participated in a three-day
arthritis sufferer learn about the 1
conference on construction insurance and risk
thritis and to point out that, althougll
D

Robert W. Francis, sen of Robert and Carol p.
Francis of 26 Lincoln Circle, Paxton, haS been promoted to the rank of major in the Air Force. His wife,
Elaine, is the daughter 11)f Dorothy. Mersereau and
stepdaughter of Herman R~ .Merser.e~u. 6~1 Unio.n St.

o

ma:nsu,P.mP.nth.P.ldinnolloahuf-1.~I-•~-- ..:---· ... !"-•

>

......c,.......

_n ..lwr .. ___ ..___ .. __ .s __ L_l

- r - - - · - - _,., ..... ""v°'au

Savings.

a,a.ua,

----- ---- - --

D

Braintree will receive $1,500 as its share of $94,748

distributed to 43 cities and towns to reduce the energy

consumption in 99 municipally-owned and operated
buildings by completing enerw. audits and engineering studies for each of the buildings.

D
Two Braintree students have l>een named to the
first quarter honor roll at The Woodward School in
Quincy. They are Lisa DiTullio, Grade 12 and Kelly

Frame, Grade 6. .,

-- _ ... _. -

- • • - • e,•-•u -• a,a aau-

More than $1400 we
John Scott Nursing Hi
bus trips, entertainr.
would like to purchas
volunteers worked
Members of Chapt,
more than 1,000 D.A.
who distributed gifts
Centers. and to the 4
Homes on December ,

[]

A temporary post office will be in operation at
Soi.Ith Shore Plaza througti December 22 from 11 a.m.
to 7 p.m.
'
D

1

D
'!be Women's Network on the South Shore will hold
an open house to share ideas and display original
band crafts of 30 Network women December 11 from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 41 Elmlawn Road. At 11 a.m. a
scrimshaw jewelry demonstration will be given and
at 1 p.m. decorative painting. For information call

:::i

0
·
The Massachusetts Society for ttte Preventio~ of,
Cniely to Children, 507 .Washington Stbl will ·:::·e

ail .• , to . ....
Parent Effectiveness Traimng av a e
~ parents beginning in January. For informa..:
tion, call the MSPCC ~t 848-0110.

_
0
th
AA.t ~ t a t i Briant potsnnoffieJ.lY.al's·sreqm·utheest,Con~
-"".1.
ucm s
Oucu one o 1
Cl
~V
wiuiourmrappomtm.ent or caifl~I8Uo.-----0
Robert A. Woolf has been named to Second Honors
Roll at Xaverian Brothers High School.
#.

D

D

Hershel E. Hall Jr. of 38 Poulos Rd. has been appointed a consultant in the General Engineering Division of Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation. He
will provide technical expertise in· developing computer-aided design, layout and engineering ap{>lications for process, industrial and power plant proJects.
D

Braintree's Kelly Hasson played on the 1982 varsity
volleyball team at Archbishop Williams High School,
and helped her team achieve a 9-4 record, placing the
team in third place in Div. 1 in the Catholic Conference League.
D

Anthony J. Parziale Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony J. Parziale, 55 St. Claire St., has been awarded
a J3.S. degree magna cum laude in business administration from Sufflk University. He was a
member of Delta Mu Delta National Society in
business administration and the Delta Alpha Pi
Honor Society. .
,.
·
Tile newly-organized St. Clare's Social Club's first
annwil Christmas Party will be held Saturday,
December 4 at King's mu from 8 a.m. to t p.m. and
will include music by .the Jimmy Kelly orchestra,
snacks, dessert and coffee. For tickets call Mrs.
Curles Moore; ,Be8735. .
e;
.

. , .·

Mary Golden, daughter of~. and Mrs. James
Golden, 32 Hollis Ave., has achieved second honors
for the first term at MontrQse, .. a. day school in
Brookline for girls in GJ:ade 7 thro~gh ~2• She is ii · .YEighty residents ,
·
·
, > &Qnething Can Be D
runth grade r . . . , , . ,1;,
.
'
Braintree Hospital an
0
William T. Rowan of Braintree, vice president of
250 Pond Street. P11l"pq
Frye Insurance Agency, participated in a three-day
arthritis sufferer lean
conference on construetion insura_nce and risk
tbritis and to point out ti
management held.in Dallas by the International Risk
present, early treatme
M
t
t t te
can help minimize the c
anagemen Ins I u •

·-~

Julie Bregoli, Kathy Foy and Sharon Canavan of
the Future Medical Club were chairmen for the
Great American Smoke Out November 18 at Archbishop Williams High School. Posters were placed
encouraging smokers to give it up for 24 hours and
Larry Hagman (J.R.) special "stop smokin' wrist
snappin' red rubber bands" were distributed to be
snapped every time the urge to smoke was felt.

. ·.

m

·

0



0

·• . D

Three Braintree res
received d_fgrees ~t ·
Boston University. Su
Rd. received a M. Ed. l
Education. Thomas F
received a D. Ed.
Diane Minarcin, 61 Pl
from the School of Pul

Robert W. Francis, Stln of Robert and Carol P.
Francis of 26 Lincoln Circle, Paxton, has been promoted to the rank of major in the Air Force. His wife,
Elaine, is the daughter of Dorothy. Mersereau and
stepdaughter of Herman lt.~ Merse~u. 621 Union St.

·

843-2096.

..

0

tree will be December 7 at Emmanuel parish hall
beginning with a 1 o'cl~!k coffee hour, with Mrs.
Charles Grady and Mrs. Gordon V. Sprague,
hospitality' · hostess c°""'!hairmen. The business
meeting at 2 p.m. will be c::onducted by Mrs. Edmund
E. Quintiliani, and the Christmas musicale, featuring
Nancy Miles, harpist, will be "The Sound of Wondrous Music."

.av.1.&&IIIIC.IJ.3 '-'IULIIC~WWD

'Ibe annual Merry efuistmas Fair ·wm beifield at
the Elihu White Nursing and Rehabilitation. Center
Friday, December 3 from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Tables, including a large halted goods table, will be
staffed by volunteers, and coffee and doughnuts will
be available. Mrs. Arthur Chavonelle, director of activities, was. assisted by Mrs: Alfred Petterson and
Nancy Arthur supervising the event.
\

ti. 1.2.&2..2

D. 9,400

OCT 5 1982

f(ew

~

OCT 51982

Eng111DD
New11cli~

Englan.11
New11cli~

u
Older ,AmetjbanS', w•~s •pie\,, .·

'

MEDFORD ~
NaBe~a/s, ,:should help·. Brari~~,_µoiversi.~,:~t~# of
pr:.~.Jeremy
tional Committee
Study dis p e 1 '. deep -r 0. 0 t ~ d Um. ersity,. Stiff()lk. U :ve·r··"• /Rusk;. . :c:liree. o.r.,if.Of the. H.ar_.·
·.v·
. · ...
-.-."' ' -_ . -.~t
and Resolve the I'roblems of discrimination ~ public. at- sity, Northeas .. J~ _ · vard'lJm:te'~itydnstitute for
Older Americans will hold- titu.des and. ac.t.1ons a_ga·~.t t.y., ',l'ufts -.U.m.vers.1 -._·.· n . - Learmn· :.in.· Re.:.t. i en.t an_d
.. ·. ····.g.
an all-day conference on - older Americans that nnrtt --JJniv~ity ofMassacll~tts' Centre,:JdrY :ljifelong Learnthese'issues on Sunday, Oct. tne.ir.. o.p·p.ort·u-nitie$, .~nd "_(!l~rbor;· ·'.ca_.·mpt1s.> ;· l·)·Jhe.. ~.g, ;1)e_~.·~;.. ;;~t>s.'e·I?.h
..
..
,of
10,: at Tufts University's tho~ .of our couptry. The ~~r op{arvard 1Jr;i1yer-: / Suffolk;'O-ntYersity; Adrian
Medford Hillside campus,_ p'ubhc ~ppears ·una~~e ~1ty's l!)stJtute forl.e~g RuthW~ter,9f.-thellatvardaccording to Dr. Edward L, there ;3re._about 26 nµllion m Re~ment and QeJ!ter> Mit: Genter , of Urban
Bernays, 91, of Cambridge, Americans QYer -65, 'more fQr Lifelong~LeaniingfiiAAd Studtes Dr: Frank.
. , the committ~ chairman.,
than the entire population of- .· sen. Edward M(KeppffL , GenotC!Sf,'.·:Qf . Babson Col_The ·conference was Canad~, c1bout one out opo , . The' confereµ~~'!lii'cll~ Jege:;;'Mllggfe!;Lcltvin of Blue · · · ed th · b
Aµieric~.1n20years,1tis. ~tothepAAlI~r-~,- .. - ,.. Cto$$'81UeJSJ.neld;Dr,Anne
0 ~~m-z~nbnihd se~3ice estim,ated, ~- ~r~ent ~f:.the· at .the
f F)'anc!S2~~v,~gh, ·consul0
- Fo ·e M. - ~.
ay .d rt; U.S,Jl.<>
•.>pµlat.10.n.will ~-·· oveJ ·_ ~ . lJlllve.~.Jty. :a·t··. '.-.
tan_.·_t.;_··.·.:.C·aree_rs', for1 Lat.er
>.i,. ..
r .· . · annmg, presi en 65. Eight
,of 10 :older withJec~,and se
YearsLand2Dean Norman
of . :,t.he., Massachusetts Americans are - in·.,-. good on proble:rns._ ~l Pi~t
R~fatf of ,~e . Nortn- ,
. Ass:ociation of Older ·bealfltand capa:ble9fy,9rk. by ~~ers:(~111,b
; eastern.Col~ege'of Criminal
Ari1t?'.ric8D$, leader j)f the .· Yet there. is discrimination goverrunen,ti ' •um\>1 . .. ~s. Justice~,' :.· -.
arJ .against th~m. ·Greater use of and other i,Dsl!tttti<>~-t~i: · ._ . LU,ncl.t);~·J>eserved from
- ·· Of Tufts u · ·ty the el~erly sl}ould b¢ made _ . Among I Qie CQilf~~ce n~n;tt? ')t: PJD( The . ~ _
May~r '
. •mve~i
.in liusI®ss and ~ .profes- speakers ar~: . Je;rQµte ,_ ,fere11,eeJiill c¢ttinue from t
the. umterm['s_ sions. Con~r~ to general Gross~, p~1~tofsthF /tQ,5,i>.rrt:'~pperfor µiose
tothe0
ac es belief; ·only five pe,teent of Goupcil for a J:J,va~\eWot~d;. wllo ® not atte,nd the diIµler
··· , ··
Ure elderly, .in f:he,TiLS. -~ U.S. R:eps. ,~<J.w3rp;,J, will be served from .s to 7
, .·. ·Purpose of the con- senile. One m six· elderly m Markey and B~y Frajlk; p.m•. -.
, ..
fe~11,ce, according to Dr. the U, .Srliv~ ilrpoverty, due State Rep. .Ja~ :Ba,ckin~; ·-·• Jeap mayer, p~dent of

The
to

::Bo~;~f

o;.

irem.

~tr_am
...

lk.

1



D -Vella,, .Jms.:,;c been
Student Govern>ay representative
Braintre·e · High
I.._ This · day is
1ed< to educate
eitizens to use state
:am was instituted
ill a~nd regional
I 8 pr9gran't. She is
f active in school

I

of Marie and Guy

he Massachusetts

; gradu~ted from
m University and
ls employed by the
IOl:6n

c;ili,,i1a m ~.

held Saturday.
.•m. to 1 p~m. and

Kelly orchestra,
tickets call Mrs.

iii 'will be~d ·at
abilitation. Center
l.m. to 3:30 p.m.
IOds table,. will be
nd doughnuts will
lle, director of ac:ed Petterson and
1t.

-

~~o.r.it , ·

-

.

oot

--ank:

~~tt~f~:\=~
f~~·
&xJ:~

tir:~~~~w:e

~a::d: to~~ati~n."

\

filimt~~~~,,i(J:!- t~~::~rdre,:i:

L-qns~ctive,ly on the proMembers of the ~onorary Rev. Robert Drmarit ·of,' dinner. Dr .. Richard
b1erns,of Americans over 65. commit~ include~ among -Americans f9r Oem~atic . Ro 1 a n d o f t h e
-C · ".This conference," _said others, the presidents of Action·;· Couptj!or ~Y Finn1 Mass,aellusetts. Associfltion
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _,;:____ ___;__~--'--·_·___c...:_··.-_,·___.-......~~ of Older Amencans will~
. -,
, the .toastmaster. Other
: ~ers: will),. Dr.: Ber0
The Christma~ meeting ~f the Philergians of Brain.
Father Itnnan;
More than $1400 was raised at ·"'· nays,Patil Tsong-· andU.S.
tr~e will be December 7 at Emmanuel parish hall
.
.... ~.
the
beg1niiing with a 1 o'clock coffee hour, with Mrs.
John ~ott Nursmg. Home. The monE birthday celebrant Dr
bus trips, entertainment and equi · - . - '
·
Charles Grady and Mrs. Gordon V. Sprague,
would like to purchase. Residents ft Mannmg. ·
··
.
hospitality' · hostess cCH~hairmen. The business
volunteers worked together 'tO ller~rt P~tchell comnutmeeting at 2 p.m. will be cionducted by Mrs. Edmund
0
te-e, coordmator, 1400
E. Quintiliani, and the Christmas musicale, featuring
Members of Chapter 29, D.A.V.. ~Qtcester Road, Fr~mNancy Miles, harpist, will be "The Sound of Wonmore than 1,000 D.A. v. members , mgham,. may be co~tacted
drous Music."
who distributed gifts to patients ; for further _
information -on
\
[]
Centers and to the Chelsea and I the conference.
A temporary post office will be in operation at
Homes on December 5.
South Shore Plaza through December 22 from J1 a.m.
to7~m
'

w

D

Robert W. Francis, son of Robert and Carol P.
Francis of 26 Lincoln Circle, Paxton, has been promoted to the rank of major in the Air Force. His wife,
Elaine, is the daughter of Dorothy. Mersereau and
stepdaughter of Herman I\. Mersereau, 621 Union St.
'J ··
·
·
·
Mary Golden, daughter of :rvir. and Mrs. James

Golden, 32 Hollis Ave., has achieved second honors
for th~ first 1t:rm .at Mo~tr<>se, a day school .in
B.rookllile for girls ID ~·ade 7: through J2. She is a
mnth grader.
· · ,
,._ ..
·

o

I

i.\

William T. Rowan of Braintree, vice president of
Frye Insurance Agency, participated in a three-day
conference on _construction insun\ftce and risk
management held in Dallas by the International Risk
' Management Institute.

D

Three Braintree ~sidents were among those who·

received ~ees ~t the September graduation at
Boston University. Susan M. Mcgillivray, 231 Alida
Rd. received a M. Ed. from the University's School of
Education. Tho~ F. Brunt, 302 Commercial St.,
received a D. Ed. from the School of Education.
Diane Minarcin, 61 Plymouth Ave., received a B.S.
from the School of Public Communication.
,
D
· .., Eighty residents .: attended the "Arthd$is~,
} .so.n.ething Can. Be Done'' pro~'!I· :j~nsq~ by
•, Btatntree Hospital ~ the Arthritis Foundation .at
250 Pond Street. P~se was to help the layman and
arthritis sufferer learn about the many types of arthritis and to point out that, although there is no cure at
present, early treatment and rehabilitation therapy
can help minimize the crippling ~ffects of t~is di~ease .
••

I

,i

~

-

••

GlOUCESldllLI
111D

Gloucma.•
D. 11.119

flfe,t

JUN 24 \982

~(l

NW-liclif _ _

Israel Horovitz
Gloucester playwright 'authors' new fl
ByLAURAMEADE

.

A w~ter's life isn't always as ro. mantic as it seems, says playwright
Israel Horovltz, who wrote the
. screenplay for the new movie, "Author, Author." ; .
,
· The first slaR Of reality hit at age 13,
when a New York publishing firm
rejected Horovitz' first novel ·
"Steinberg, Sex and the Saint," but
praised its "childlike quality:"
Undaunted, he plunged ahead with·
scriptwriting. A writer, director, ac~
tor and part-time Gloucester resident,
~e r~calls those many years of workmg m backstage theater companies,
where actors often lined up at his
typewriter, awaiting their scripts
fromplayshecraiikedoutweekly.
· Cambridge, 'New Jersey, London,
back to New Jersey :-- whirlwind
years of trying to cope with ~ budding
. career; a new family, classes at the
ltgyal· A~ademy of Qramatic Arts.
And, of course, wtitb,lg, .writing and
more writing still.
·....
·~There ~as!l't ever enough time to
wnte everything I wanted to write,''
Horovitz muses. "The plays that I
wrote were very imaginative plays,
~ut they were short-plays. 1 was writmg a one-act play every week.,,
There was the s~ge company he
operated from. a car dealership,
where someone had to move the cars
out of the showroom each night for the
plays, then move .them back in. Then
there was a C~n,tbridge theater. company, where he fought off the fire
dep~tment's warnings oi1J.y to have
. , the building bµrn down .a (~W, dayt;
tlate~: ,, , , . ~- ~.;" .. , ... :~ .- .< >:. :-~,,
.. But finhlJy,. th~'J,iecWs'•started fallirig ·into plac¢: Off ·Broaday · hits,
Broadway hit$, a movie scre~nplay
here, a novel there.
Today, some 30 years after that
initial rejectiQn, Israel Horovitz enjoys an international acclaim for his
works that few writers will ever
know.
The slight, unassuming 43-year-old
writer, who divides his time between
1

1
'
a GreenwichVillage apartinent,arid a neous success of four Broe
home on Traverse Street in plays, and screenplays for the 1
Gloucester, has won numerous "Strawberry Statement" and 1
aw!11"ds for his works, including. two sion special, "V.D. Blues," hew
Ob1es, the French Critics' Prize, an far as to go into seclusion for
award in literature from the Ameri-, years.
·
can Academy of Arts antl Letters and . "What .~as emerging (thou1
Guggenheim, Fulbright and National the pubbc1ty) was a person
Endowment fellowships. ,

~~n't ~e,t' ~e says. "I got gc
Last week, though, he recei:ved, a givmg mterv1ews, but I · deci1
most personal reward as he stood at wanted to get back to writing, a
the back of the Cape Ann Cinem~s for amount of money would replac
the world premiere of "Author · Au;. thrill of writing a play."
thor." When "Screenplay by I~rael
During that hiatus, he st
Horovitz" flashed across the screen, ~reek trage<;lies at New York U1
~loucester Showed its appreciation to s1ty and encorporated that style
its adopte~ son through their cheers series of plays about his birthJ
and applause. The movie was partly calledthe''WakefieldPlays,"
filmed in Gloucester.
"People know now that fa1
I
Still, success hasn't come easy to based on envy, and it will come
Horovitz.
to you," he says. "It's not somE
. There's the ongoing effort poured you chose, it's not somethini
into each new piece - trying to c:reate w~t.
.
.
something new . yet with universal
·For a writer to allow hims
apperu and ~ messa~ aboutlife ·f t
~«>Jlle JamoU$ is, I think, a
··~i>p~·:.~yf.~"~'spentiS'lo_u~,~-Vsecydan.g~~tJwl& 1,th~.it 1
hours a day at his type:Writer. ·. · · · ·be unproductiv.e, ~d the price 1
Then, there's the endless barrage of be very! ve~ h1~.
.
publ!city --: reporters demanding inFaJl!ily life 1s all-1mportai
terviews, -television camera lights Horovitz,. a t~~me that comes th;
blaring, telephones ringing incessant- clearly 1?1 A;uthor, .Au~or.
ly, meetings promotions· screenings speaks with pride of his wife, '
openings. •
. '

' c~ass marat~oner Gillian Ada.mi
· But through it all, Horovitz tries to h!s thr~ ~~il~en. He also i.nc
maintain his identity, first a:s :a per- his family m his travels and his ,
59n, then as a writer. And about 10
.
y~ars ago, shortly after tl).e sjmtiltaHorovi~, page C8

/.l-

srael HorOvitz
Gloucester playwright 'authors' new film
By LAURA MEADE

A writer's life isn't always as rotantic as it seems, says playwright
;rael Horovitz, who wrote the
!reenplay for the new movie, "Autor, Author." .
,
The first slap of realfty hit at age 13,
'hen a New York publishing firm
ejected Horovitz' first novel,·
Steinberg, Sex and the Saint," but
raiSedits ''childlike quality.''
Undaunted, he plunged ahead wi~'
eriptwriting. A writer, director, ac>r and part-time Gloucester resident,
e recalls those many years of worklg in backstage theater companies,
rhere actors often lined up at his
,pewriter, awaiting their scripts
~mplayshecrankedoutweekly.
Cambridge, 'New Jersey, London,
ack. to New Jersey - Whirlwind
ears of trying to cope with a budding
areer, a new (amily, classes at the
loyal Academy of Dramatic Arts.
llld, of course, writin'g, writing and
11ore writing still.
· ·:There ~asn't ever enough time to
mte everything I wanted to write,"
lorovitz muses. "The plays that I
vrote were very imaginative plays,
1ut.they were short-plays. I was writng a one-act play every week'.,,
There was the stage company he
1perated from a car dealership,
ivhere someone had to move the cars
>Ut of the showroom each night for the
~lays, then moye .them back in. Then
mere was a CaII1bridge theater com~any, where he fought off the fire
~ep~t~ent's warnings oi1Jy to have
~e .building bµrn. down• a_ (e\V. ?ay~

later,,., ·· · ·~ ,.: ..

~e

1

. ·

,

:.•

, ,·c .•.

;}"i3t1t finhlly,.
"i>ii&g· started' fallmg~ into plac~. Off Broaday · hits,
Broadway hits,· a movie scr~nplay
llere, ,a novel there.
· Today, some 30 years after that
initial rejectiQn, Israel Horovitz en\oys an international acclaim for his
r,orks that few writers will ever
tllOW •

'.l'lie slight, unassuming 43-year-old
iliiter, who divides his time betwee~

··---,-~~- j

. -·--

'

a Greenwich Village apartment arid a neous success of· four Broadway
home on Traverse Street in plays, and screenplays for the movie
Gloucester, has won numerous "Strawberry Statement" and televiaw~ds for his works, includ~g. two sion special, "V:D. Blues," he went so
Obies, the French Critics' Prize, an far as to go into seclusion for seven
award in literature from the Ameri~ years.
·
can Academy of Arts and Lettelis and
"What was emerging (though all
Guggenheim, Fulbright and National the publicity) was a person who·
Endowment fellowships. ,
· .
wasn't me," he says. "I got good at
Last week, though, he received a giving interviews, but I · decided I
most personal reward as he stood at wanted to get back to writing, and no
the back of the Cape Ann Cinemas for amount of IJIOney would replace the
the world premiere of "Author Au~ thrillofwritingaplay."
~
.
thor." When "Screenplay by I~rael
During that hiatus, he studied
Horovitz" flashed across the screen ~reek tragec,ies at New York Univer~loucester showed its appreciation t~ sity and encorporated that ~tyle into a
its adopted son through their cheers series of plays about his birthplace,
and applause. The movie was partly called the "Wakefield Plays,"
filmed in Gloucester.
"People know now that fame is
' Still, success hasn't come easy to based on envy, and it will come back
Horovitz.
·
to you,,O he says.· "It's not something
. There's the ongoing effort poured you chose, it's not something you
into each new piece- trying to create w~t.
.
.
something .new, yet with universal
For a writer _to allo'Y himself to . /
appe@l.AA~ ~ ~~:t1i-&~ aboµt life; Jf to ~~o~e faille>~ ~i .t thil!k, .a very,
·~ontvb_,µt · ~ - - ~ , · ~ Iour,-,v.ecy.(Jang~Q}J-~~ng,J.th~-1twould
hours a day at his typewriter. _ .
be .unproducbv_e, ~d the price would
Then, there's the endless barrage of be very, ve~ hi~.
.
publicity '"""'. reporters demanding inFalJ.?-ilY . life 1s all-important to
terviews, . television camera; lights Horovitz,. a "!~me that comes th,i;ough
blaring, telephones ringing incessant- clearly 1!1 J\Utbor, _Author. He
ly, meetings promotions· screenings speaks with pnde of his wife, world
openings. •
. '
·
' c~ass mara~oner Gillian Adams, and
.
· But through it all, Horovitz tries to il!S thr~ ~~il<;tren; He also i_ncludes i
maintain his identit.y, first as _ per- his family m_ his travels and his work).'
•:.a
.
son, then as a writer, And about 10
/;_
y~ars ago, shortly after tl}e simultaBorovl~, page C8 ·

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{ Continued {rom page Cl \ r'
Talking about his family, the with a . flashlight ... books like unconscious fidgeting, he jqmps
,
·
In- upcoming season for the 'Catcher in the Rye' and 'Peyton to answer the telephone, or to
deed, he says, they've been the Glou~ester Stag~ Company, his Place,' which I thought were check the rain battering against
the front door, any excuse for
":Jlllllllg - H?~ov1tz h!,lS been run- dirty.
impetus for many of his ideas.
"I started writing when l was movement.
First there's Rachael 20 a stu- mng competitively sIDce he :was
dent. at the University' or' North 1~ rears old - all come e_.asr to 13," Horovitz recalls. "I wrote a i Yet, despite the escaping enerCarolina. She.'11 be working for a him. Yet, he shrugs off his .s,uc- novel called 'Steinberg, Sex and gy, he's always thinking, quietly
preparing statements before the
New York publishing firm this cess, and seems reluctan~ tQ talk the Saint."
questions are even asked.
summer, Horovitt says. While about hi~self, his accomplish"I sent it to a publisher in .New
.
there, Rachael plans to interview ments or his ~ork.
York who didn't know I was 13- · Soon, the hour is up. He apoloplaywrights whose works will be When q~ened about h1~ past, or years-old. It was rejected,. and · gizes for . the limited amount of
performed this season by the lli.e meanIDgs behind his plays, praised for having a wonderful time, saying he wished the interGloucester Stage Co., of· which his brow furrow~. J:Ie pauses a~d childlike quality, which of course view could have been set a month
her father is one. of the founders looks away, th~IDg. Then, ID was about the worst thing they later, during a more relaxed
and artistic director
stream of consc1ousness, he lets could have said.''
· · · time.
. T~en Matthew, he's 20, and a fly. some of .the hidden side,. the
"With a movie, it never goes]'
The rejection ended, for a
student at Boston University. 9~1et rea~nIDg.that sel~om f1'n~ while, Horovitz' budding future as away," Horovitz says: ". . . It's
He'll be directing the stage com- it s way IDto prIDt, outside of his a prose writer. ~ut it didn't lik_e taking a plane ride instead ·of
pany's film season this year, a scr~nplays. . .
dampen his zest for writing.
running.''

fund-raising session featuring a . W1~ a dry wit and an ~C31!ny
His first play, "The ComeI,
When you run, you see the flow-·'
variety of films his father has IDtens1ty, 1:1IS brown eyes p1ercIDg b k " · d ·
ac , ma e its
~l>U.ined.
·
· and probmg, . he contemplates ~~stage debut at ers, . the turtles, all. these·. li'ttle ·
when Horovitz
. Finally, there's Adam, a 16- w~at he does, search~g the inter- was only 17, with Horovitz as its observations, he continues, But in
· a plane, the pilot says, "there's•.
rear-old sophmore at the McBur- v 1 ewer. for s 1 g n s of star.
the Grand Canyon" and you look
11~y-School in New York. Though underst~dIDg. ,
. ~
Paul Benedict, who now plays down and say, "yeah there's the
tns older brother and sister pro- · ~e m~ute, he s talkIDg ab~ut
'
.
fess their father's love for writ- the. mten~1ty of ?reek ~raged1e~, _ Bentley in the television series Grand Canyon."
"When you do a play down-'.},
ing, Adam favors_ acting instead. an IDtens1ty he tries to s1~ulate ID "The Jef(erso!l's," and who reLast year, he was featured by the works ,.adapted ·to today s ~orld. ~ntly starred 1!1 the Boston theat- · town, yo~ :don't leave until every- )
;tage company ,during a reading Horo~1tz muses about what hfe. as ~cal productJon, "Betray~," one tells you how .t~ey liked the \
>f one of his father's plays, "The a wnter would have been hke directed that first play, Horovitz play. . . I stand in the back and
says; Benedict was a few years watch; .The11,,.someone· calls and\:
li'ormer One on One Basketball th~fy·
.
·· . .
f>layer.''
ou ~O\Yi. Ell!•P~des wrote older, proba~ly a graduate stu• says ,they loved It (the movie) in<
Baton Rouge. So what?''
>i
. Horovitz likens his family .l.ife l03 ~lays ID his J•fE:time? That dent at the time.
"I knew I need~d some kind of
;
·
to-that of Ivan Travalian the ~asn t exactly Neil Simon knock"Sure, writing is very roman;creenwnting star. of "A~thor, mg ~'!~ 'Come Blow Your education because I'd be around
writers who were talking about tic," Horovitz says. "It's just you
~uthor," played by Al Pacino, Hom.
some kind of writing that was never question it. Sure, you-put in .
who doesn't so much set a role
Then, just as suddenly, he certified, and I wouldn't kriow your hours. But you only have one ·
model for his children as let them breaks off 1into an ~musing anec- about it," Horovitz says.
·
life. There's plenty of time for
!>e.models themselves;
tlote from his childhood. Or he
So he supplemented his ,one- sleep down the road.
There's a touch of Horovitz in pauses to comment about the apstay
"It's
thing to
ea.ch of his works, he says: "I proaching storm, or the harried term tw at Suffolk University written a wonderfuland have have
'th
J.,
something
peowould never try to avoid putting life' that follows a movie or play wi
o years 1>1 Study at the pie look up to it. There's a certain
myself in the characters. . . but I premiere. He b~hes at mosqui- Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts level of achievement · that you '
don't feel that the details of my tos nipping at his bare legs, well- in London - chosen not so much
life are interesting enought to put toned from ·long daily runs with fof the .curric~um as for the i reach? and people respect it. So
name, he admits. And when he many people go through life, and
on a stage or in the movies. It's Gillian. ,
feelings," he pauses. "For me, I
Horovitz has ;been an actor for returned to the states in 1963, "I. their lives don't accumulate. And
have ideas about the quality of about as long
he can remem-· arrived back in Amercia, alQiost anybody who's not in that circumlife and how it can be made ber, and as a youngster growing immediately an established stance is bl~ed somehow.
.
- .
\
up in Wakefield, he often would playwright."
better."
I think lot of people want.·
Horovitz is a restless man, ;it, when theyadon't know what it · ·.·
.' Horovitz tries to reflect those write· and perform.his own comthose feelings into works with a edies. He ·also was interested in whose energy escapes in small ris. They should spend a couple of
universal appeal.
oratory contests; especially when bursts' of activity. He moves the days in my skin. . . TI)ere's a '1
interview from a cluttered up- wonderful French saying, 'To be
~ "I have no less of a desire now he wrote his own speeches.
to be a writer than I did when I In addition to his youthful the- stairs study to the rocks of his content or happy in your own skin
was 14," Horovitz said, his face atrical ef!deavors, the young backyard, then back irito the din- is everything.' ''
drawn serious. "But now, I'm Horovitz enjoyed · running and ing room - all in sight of an hour.
Clasping and unclasping his
more concerned about what I'm rea~g: ''I read a lot, basically
Laura Meade is on .the staff of Israel a
writing about an<I how it's going boo~s that I thought would be hands, playing ~ith his · coffee
Author"
dirty. I read ,-rider my covers mug, tearing at an or~ge -:- all the Gloucester Daily Tillles.
toaffectpeople.'' ·
1

as

1

·J
_J ..

"

...

Jthors' .n,ew film·
with . a flashlight ...books like
'Catcher in the Rye'- and 'Peyton
Place,' which I thought were

unconscious fidgeting, he jumps
to answer the telephone, or to
che<;k the rain battering against
dirty.
the front door, any excuse for
"I started writing when I was movement.
.
13," Horovitz recalls. "I wrote a I Yet, despite the.escaping enernovel called 'Steinberg, Sex and gy, he's always thinking, quietly
the SairiC
·
preparing statements before the
questions are even asked.
"I sent it to a publisher in New
Soon, tne hour is up. He apolo-.
York who didn't know I was 13spast, or years-old. It was rejected, and gizes for .the limited amount of
is plays, praised for having a wonderful time, saying he wished the inter~
uses and childlike quality, Which of course view could have been set a month
l'hen, in
the worst thing they later, during a more relaxed
:, he lets was about said."
I
time.
could have
·
side, the
"With a movie, it never goesl
The rejection ended, for a
om finds while, Horovitz' budding future as away," Horovitz says. " .... It's
de of his a prose writer. But it didn't like taking a plane ride instead ·of
running."
·
dampen his zest for writing.
- .
!,.
uncanny
His first play, "The ComeWhen you run, you see the flow- i
piercing back," inade its stage debut at
emplates Suffolk Universyy when Horovitz ers, , the turtles, all these little
the inter- was only 17, with Horovitz as its obsel'Vatioils, he continues. But in
a plane, the pilot· says, "there's t
ns of star.
the Gi:and Canyon" and you look k
Paul Benedict, who now plays down and say, "yeah, there's the · ·.
ng about
.,
ragedies, Bentley ii,. the television series Grand C?fiyon." ·
"When you do a play down-·{
nulatein· "The Jef(erson's," and who re's world. cently starred in the Boston theat- · town, you don't leave until every- <
1atlife as rical production, "Betrayal," one tells ·you how .they liked the i
1een like directed that first play,. Horovitz play. . . I stand in the. back and .\
says; Benedict was a few years watch; Then, ~someone calls and ff
~s wrote older, probably a graduate stu- says ,they loved it (the movie) in\
. Baton Rouge,.. So what?"
·
1e? That dent .at the tinie. .
"I knew. I need~d some kind of
··
1n knock"Sure, writing is very roman~
w Your education because I'd be around
writers who were talking about tic,•; Horovitz says. "It's just, you
some kind of writing that was never question it. Sure, you-put in
enly, 'he certified, and I _
wouldn't k~ow your hours. But you only have one
ing anec- about it, n Horovitz says.
. life. There's plenty of time for
:i. Or he
.- - ·
sleep down the road.
So he supplemented ~s 101_1e"It's a wonderful thing to have
1t the ap! harried te!ffi stay at Suffolk Umvers1ty written something and have peo~
pie look up to it. There's a certain.
~ or play with two years "of st~dy ~t the
. mosqui- ~oyal Academy of Dramatic Arts level of achievement that· you
,gs, well- m London - ~hosen not so much reach, and people respect it. So
uns with fof the ·curnc~um as for the . many people go through life, and
name, he admits. An~ when ~e, i their live$ don't ac~umulate. And
actor for re~ed to ~e states I_D 1963, I . anybody who's not ID that circumremem- ~ved. back ID Amerc1a, a;most stance is blessed somehow.
· · ··
growing nnmed1ately an estabhshed
1
en would playwright."·
-· '
" ... I think. a lot of peop,.e want. . . . .
·
·tz
.
Horov1 1s a restiess man, ,it; when they don't know what it · ·
,wn comrested in whose energy escapes in small ,is; They should sp.end a couple of_·..
illy when bursts of activity. He moves the days in my ·skin. . . Tllere's a ·1
s.
interview from a cluttered up- wonderful French saying, .'To be
thful the- stairs study to the rocks of his
t ·t· h · 10 ·
8 kin
~ young backyard, then back irito the din- f:!vf'ry:in:~Pr, your own
1ing arid ing room - all in sight of an hour.
basically
Clasping and unclasping his
vould be hands, playing \\;ith his coffee
'f .covers mug; tearing at an .orange - all

nily, the
'or the
any, his
,eenruni he was
i e~sy to
his,suc1t to falk
omplish-

1

1

s!IDSION ff£lfA1D 11.MERICAN
BOSTON, MA
D. 285,101

JUL

91982

Ne-w'
gngland

I

Newsclip

I

Kill the 'Authl/r!Author!'

Lawrence P. Hunt

Ellen Cataldo·

·Pliyllis Spiro

Dennis F. King

Brookline, empfoyment counse'lor; 25.

Chelsea, Suffolk University student;

;f:lorwood, legal secretary; 44.

Waltham, computer operator; 26.

Al Pacino is a playwright whose
wife walks out on him, leaving him to
care for their' five children while he is
trying to complete work on a major
play.

18.

,

·

.
"' .
.
"Author! Author!" was a terrible
"Author! Author!" deals with the
"~uth~r! Author!" is an ~xcellen. t t'· movie. Al Pacino should stick to '"T.he ; problems of divorced parents and parmov_1e. ~ts. be1ovi.d exl?ectat1ons. Al ; ~?dfather." It was extremely dis: entless children. Al Pacino portrays a
Pacmo 1s at his fmest m a. role that''· ~omted. The kids in the movie were . Broadway.writer in conflict with a careally suit~ ~im. The plot has real ' terrific. They had the good parts, and reer and marriage.
The story is basically slow-moving
depth; and 1t 1s yery easy to relate to they are very good actresses. and
actors.
and the plot is weak in many spots.
Despite a fine cast, including some his family in the movie.
An attempt at humor by Alan King in
clever child actors arid some notable
Dyan Cannon was beautiful, but the beginning of the story fails.
His rjlildren kept the plot interest-,1
adult ones, this film's weak plot and
~nybody could have played that part.
The strongest part of the film lies
corny script oft~n leave you uncon- ing with their rowdyness. They were: It really was no big deal. I could hard~
in the performances of the children
lovable. But when they were around,,,,
vinced and uninterested.
and their feelings towards the onethere was a.lways ~haos.
· ly wait until the movie was over.
. parent syndrome.
While juvenile audiences may find
I think it had a very weak plot.
Pacino shows his overall talent by
this film cute of amusing, I think
I would recommend this movie tci1 However,· Alan King was superb as making his•'performance a blend of
most adults will be sorry they paid to· all ages. It is a good story with a great usual. Other than that, there really
see it, as this "major motior1 picture" ending .and will keep you l~ughing a'll isn't too much that I can say about it, humor, courage and concern. The stovery rarely rises above the level of an through it. If you want to see a good except that I was glad that it ended so ry inv9lves a critical social issue, but
allo¥is the viewer to realize it too late
, average televi~ion situation comedy.
movie, see "Author! Author!".
I eould get out of the theater.
' in the film.

BOS1UII DB
BOSTON.. ML
IL~-----

DEC 101982

NOV 18 1982

_on: :B.eacon

_.rew of life
Hill -

lly Susan Forrest
News). He· would read a few
, -.• Rough and ·stormy. No need to stories from each 'of the papers,
fret,: that's -not the weather but confesses like everyone else,
f(.)?'ecast- for' the' .c~ming New he read the: comics fust. This
E.n~land winter; put it is bow fascination with journalism led
North Enc:Lresident Keith West~ Westerman to pursue a college
e#man de~eribes the political degree in English from UM.ass/
elmiate .
MBS$1lchusetts. The Boston and masters· degree -. in
''F'olitical · meteo~ologists" words Mass C.Ommuilications from Bost~\~a$E!d on the e:xperience and on University. To supplement
knowledge that comes' with being - educational costs, Westerman
~-p~ess officer .to the Gove:rnor of worked as a stringer .for the
~e Commonwealth;
Quincy ,Patriot Led~r, Hingb~
-!'Massachusetts politics are not Journal, Walpole Times, and
ohlf stormy but are on tlie level of _Boston Globe. Add to his credits
'hurricane. GoocLpoliti~ians- 'm' -: tbe fact' he started a summer
this state play .poljt;i~ hardball. journalism program for lowThey are _willing to ~e risks and income Boston High school studc,iE!stroy . or:~verwhelm _ their ents at Suffolk University and
~nent. in. every poss!!)le way hosts a talk show, called "From the
sJil?l't of illegalities;" We$rman Source" on the UMass/Boston
contends.
radio, WUM&FM, 91.9fm, on .
. When Westerman. first met Thursday nights.
G().vernor King he_ was a bit
But by January 5th, his office·
ov~hvhelmed by him·· and the with huge windows that overlook
re§ponsibilityof his job as-a press Beacon Hill must be cleared out to
officer. Ovfr _ _tenures at the make way for the Governors
his
sblte liouse, Westerman_ said he. successor. Westerman, .like· the
'\V8S atile to see the human side of other members of the Governor's
~c:l ·- King and . was. no longer staff has begun the tedious· search
i~timidated . by · the title that for a new job. "My prefere,11ce is
ac:lorns King. "I see Ed King as a · work in politics, ultimately to be a:
good tough_ politician. . A fair, press secretary for an elected
h<>llest, devout catholic American official. But there are· no schools .
, ,~ ho_w: he cap be ~st, SWJ!Dled .up.i• for }!ress. secretaries; its a job you
. "There is"a-misconception on the happ;~~ariliif iuek/Washmgt}i
part of the public as to what the on wo:uld . interest me if I was
~vernor is really like. The working with soine~e with
<i9yernor got a bad start with the considerable influence. I'm not
Tb~ Wa& hard for the press power crazy but! want to be
office to overcome. I think ll'e where the ac.tion is," Westerman
' ~re 90 percent successful in says.
· ·•ting the word 'out, but we just
And the Governor's office is
,~ouldn't make UP the lost ground,;" where th~ aetion is. Westerman
,Westerman states. referring to , has· many memories to validate
.tJ<in.g's recent loss in the. primary this clair,it •. Working a 14 hour day
·to 'formet Governor- .Michael . was not out of the ordinary.In fact'
~kis.
· ·
after ohe su~ day .that invo&ed
· <'tili:e many of the inner state chasing the Governor around the
,Jw'tt~ ·elm, Westennan. said he state .for· various public appearsurpri5Etd. by the election anees. Westerman looked forward
ie~µ-lts._ A poll conducted ~veral to getting at least six hours of
befor_e the ptjm.ary against · sleepthatnight: "Instead as'I w.as
' Micihael
showed the two ab,out to. leav~ fc,r home, a plane

of

a

to

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-. ias
~ys

t

I>ukakis

.ij~~~:~~¥.:w:i1:i:::
I},t,!d,the

to ~~e·
Goyer11or.
' *':.elected.'. · He is a very hard
~~~~dtt.!h:;!_

;;,n~

==~~tow::r:·w~cto.:a;
would leaveat6:00 a'.m. with the
_Govmi,o:r to testify at ~ congress-

,~~~=:o~~a:~·s~~::

,=.!'?•·r·~.,.--,~ -·~J -"'t:'.'':J~~-. ..· . __ . . !~rv1ew yesteraay 1na1 ne was on .
JCfi:f!'llough he could not be reached ·. vacation when the pension was ap- ·
i(Qf;~omment yesterday, McNeill proved Oct. 7, 1981, effective Dec.
·
last summer, in a brief in(er- 31 , 198l. Cook said Hicks and
~at the State House, that his . Gately knew in advance· he would •
:;~ility claim was .based on a · be away on tllat date.
.. ;
-~·"'""" injury aggravated by the
Retirement Board workers say
ofthe budget chiefs job. ·
thatfederal ipvestigators have ex~ ·
wever, McNeill subsequently pressed an interest in the McNeill,
·updergraduate courses at ~uf- Rendini and Henderson cases be- •
University, accepted the chittr~ y~nd the general subpoenaing of ·
s p of Rosemarie E. San~. th'e files of 1500 pension cases last •
,.
?~•s'brief campaign to be Massa~ spring. Additional subpoe~as were !
~efi:asetts secretary of state·and ran issued to the board for any ;:tddi- '
· , · 1ection to the board of direc- tional records it might haye iri the ,
-~·· . . of the city employees' credit three cases, and sources say all '
iium.Jpn.;
three former budget workers_ llave
~~~fhile he never becam~ active in been , summoned before a federal
~lii:~San~one campaign, Mc.Neill . grand jury probing allegati9ns of
hvis= re-elected to the credit union municipal corruption in Boston.
::i10ird Monday after campaigning
Attention first was attracted to
:t#' person at City Hall.
the $24,000 a year disability pen' :-::in accordance with a court or- sion awarded to Rendirii when for~
~r; a report~r yesterday was al- mer Massacl:msetts Senate PresF
ltfwed to examine Retirement dent John E. Powers ap~red beBoard files in all three cases and fore the Retirement Board to dis,·-91i µi:w Department report in the pute Rendini's claim that he be. McNeil) case after all medical iqfor- came disabled as a result of a crash
:,.~Jon had been purged from the tn Powers' car.
·
,~peaments. These showed:
The name of Henderson, whose
~]:'J McNeill's accident oc~urred disability pension is $15;400 a
1

-

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. >i.,• he···~upJ~l:n:°'1&t\iit~o··~.&·6W~~f~~~--~r;;;J ~~:.~•
. , . .
.
,
ne area -o inquiry n
. ,

. ..

·, -into the building [City :tiall] sources say, is a strong statement
corridor" ~n the ei~hth by one doctor who exa~ined him,
~-'J~- The_ budge~; director said ~e disputing that his medical .prob!~~been mspectmg repa1r,work m }ems were caused by his city job.
.-th.itReal Property Department just
Fed~ral interest in the cases ap; ~ e the accident.
.
parently has been sparked by the
r~ · :Two of the three witnesses in association of the three men in the ·
'tease were Francis P. Tracey budget department, by their all
J .... <ft Thomas W. Gately. Tracey, having obtained pensions within
a de~uty r~l property co~~ an eight-month period_ last year,
~ 1rp~~1oner, 1s now m a federal pem~ and by their alleg~ contributions
j ~e~~ary following his conviction to Kathryn White's b,irthday party.
·. on tax evasion charges t.hat arose
There are also indications that
'Jj~of.political fund-r~ising .a~t;vi- McNeill and Rendini filed for disJ:~es. G~tely, then a semor official of abiJty pensi.ons after falling from
-1
p_artment, was elected chair- Javor with the mayor. Mcl\Jeill was
fthe Retirement Board;_ with ·unable t<;> perform his job d~il!f a
s backing. and voted m fa- sustained battle with th,e·,Qity
f granting the McNeill pen- Council last'year, and Rendini; according to his close friend; City
The accident occurred on Feb. · Councilman Frederick C. Laqgone,
,t J . '.ce 1977. The pension application was blamed by the administration
·filed 41/2 years later on July 29, , · for leaks ·of financiardocuments to
-~ ·
. State law specifies that pen~ the council.
1
are to be awarded on the ha"They were trying to get rid of .
:
f accidents that .occur within him - that's why he got out," LanJ., ....... /y~rs of the filing of a disabil- gone said yesterday.
.' '"itwnsion application..
'
. ,.·.;~ Retirement Board Executive nr-~ ··
~~tor Brian M. Leahy said in an;
. iptei:-view yesterday that neither
Nfofiles in the McNeill case nor: the .
, (a~ recording of the session at ·
'. vvbkh the pension was approved .
. 'djntaiil any indication that Tra- ·
·,.¢..eY':: Gately or Daniel Clifford, a
· .Jp.1fd witness, gave testimony or
hii'ftten statements in support of
. [Me.Neil's accident report.
f . Corporation Counsel Carroll
tsalqJn his report that "Mr. Gately
~- ...
'.;h~ ·•· obvious problems Sitting in
~'@gment of facts he allegedly wit~n¢ssed."
.
f '>_Gately said in a telepllone inter:Vfew last night: "That · is Harold
• iC:wrolt:s opinion\' He refused to
= c,:..·':

::t;<i., .. he

f, .

ff,n~.

.i

11nu~cane. \:iOOO polit.t~s--. in
.this itate play .political.· hardball,
They ·are willing to take risks,~d
ciestroy · or-.;Qverwhelm their
OJ)p(>nent .in. every possiJ)le way
short of illegalities/' Westerman
cQDtends.
Whert Westerman first met
Gp,vernor · King he was a bit
overwhelmed by him and the
ie~ponsibility of bis job as·a press
officer. Over his tenures at the
state house, Werrterman said he·
able to see the human side of
Ed King and · was,, no . longer
i~timidated . by the title· that
adorns King. "I see Ed King as a ·
good tough_ politician. A fair,
honest, devout catholic American
, -is how he c:&n be best-summed ,Up."
' . ~Tlim misconception the
part of the public as to what the
.Governor is really like. The
<¥6yernor got a bad start with the
~ec,iia. Th~ was. hard for the press
:office t,o overcome. I think we
' w'ere 90 percent successful in
·-~tillg the word 'out, but we just
cOlildn't make qp the lost gro~d;"
;:Westerman states. referring to '
.j;,<ing's recent loss in the, primary
former Governor Michael

was

is'a

on

tile tact Ile started a summer
journalisni prog~am for lowincome Boston High school· students at Suffolk. University and
hosts a talk show called "From the
Source" on the UMass/Boston
radio, WUMikFM, 91.9fm, on
Thursday nights.
But by January 5th, his office
with huge windowsitbat overlook
Beacon Hill must be cleared out to
make way for the Governors
successor. Westerman; like the
other members of the Governor-'s
staff has begun the tedious' searc~
for a new job. "My prefere,~ce is to
work in politics, ultimately_to be a:
press secretary , for an elected
official. But there are no schools .

for Pr~ss ~retarie,s; its a job you,
-hap~ntf'tanci1>y·luek::wishbigV1
on wo:uld interest me if I was
working with . someone with
considerable influence. rm not
power crazy, butl want to be
wIJ.ere the action is," Westerman

says.

And. the Governor's office is
~here th~ action is. Westemian
hu' many memories to validate
this clai91 •. Working a 14 hour day
was
out of the o~aty. Inf"*'
~· ·
~r one.such day that involved
\i./Like ~Y.. of th, inner state chasing the Governor around the
~µse clan,' Westerman said he state -for van,ous public appearwas Sur})~ by ' the election im.ces.· Westerman looked forward
'tesults. A .poll C<>ndqcted several .to getting at least six hours of
~jts befo~ -the" primary against . sleep that night: "Instead as I was
··.··'Mitiliael Dbkakis showed the two imout to leav~ fpr home, a plane.
··-~~- arid''n~.. One poll>everi' ticket to Washington, D.C. was
~t~ a]Ci#g lead."I woultl
ban~ ,to me an~ I. was tol~. l
iiked ' to see . die Governor would leave at 6:00 a.m. with the
is a . very bard _Go11~ to testify at a congressworking man, and .I think w~ a io~~tteeon)Jte state's·new
better can~~ than his ·oppon~ dnnk' driving , ~gislation: ·You
-~~t~ But v,e ha~e'.to put tije past· nev~ lmow. what will happen in

·.to

not

have

'~~- ·ne

;; < e
!1'

,•

gr,i,i, UP.,, w
est~an..·kpew : he· . -~f th,'war. ~fore tliEfprhi¥~ we
•. w~te<i' tc>, l>e a wrjter. Ile fond.ly . were living :ori ,the, ,edge of death
:rerti~DJ.bets his ,d~ bringing home. · arid no~ ev~hfui'~ quiet'. Its a ,

• fout papers w~enJie ¢ame home at .. funny feeling. ,in th'e state house

nig~t. (The 01a".Boston?' Record, ; right now and you bave to ask
,. Herald,Glo1>eandNewYorkDaily - yourself whats wrong."
.
(

BANKER & TRAOESMA~
BOSTON, MA.

w. 6,000

<.~~

~~-

~:::c::

,l:iwncif Act~ ,To
Curb Institutional
Grovvth In Boston
The Bostwi City Council has adopted a
new ordinance aimed at curbing institutional expansion in rf'sinPnt;,,! ~==:;~!;orhoods.
The ordinance, introduced by Councillor
Bruce Bolling and approved by the council
over a veto by Mayor Kevin White, will require tax-exempt institutions to obtain a
permit before they can convert a residential
building to another use. The permit will be
required even if the building is to be used to
provide housing for the institution's students or employees.
. In addition to the removal permit (which
1s to be granted by a new Institutional Expansion Board), the ordinance requires annual licensing of all dormitories and calls for
yearly safety and fire inspections, to be financed by per-building and per-bed fees
paid by the institutions.
'
Although aimed primarily at universities
the ordinance will also apply to any "edu~
cational, literary, benevolent, charitable,
health or scientific organization" that owns
dormitory buildings or seeks to acquire ex~
isting buildings.
According to Mr. Bolling, the purpose of Ii~
the new removal process is not "punitive"
nor is it an attempt to prevent nonprofit in- to
stitutions from acquiringtoperty in the i't
""con · ed on page 8 lg:.,.,,
1.Hlf'.'tlll.:

Council Acts To Curb
Institutional Growth
continued from page 1 1...... ) _
city. But the absence of any clear controls
has created a serious "imbalance" in many
residential neighborhoods.
"We're not denying that the [tax-exempt]
educational and health institutions contribute to the city in a substantial way," Mr.
Bolling emphasized. "All we're saying is
that there must be an effective balance between the expansion needs of the institutions
and the needs of the neighborhoods [and
their residents.] Our intent is to begin a process that will at least make institutions recognize that they can't meet their needs at the
expense of the neighborhoods," Mr. Bolling
explained.
In his letter vetoing the ordinance, Mayor
White acknowledged the need for the kind
of balance Mr. Bolling described. However,
the mayor also questioned the legality of the
ordinance as well as its necessity, noting that
the removal process it establishes "unnecessarily duplicates [the review] pe1 '0rmed by
existing city agencies."
The Council subsequently overrode the
veto but the legal questions remain, and they
are going to be raised by at least one and
possibly more of the universities affected by
·1

,fie new law. 1':ccording to William Harvey,·
general counsel for Boston University, the
ordinance violates the equal protection clause
of the Constitution, by singling out certain
types of property owners for regulations
"that depend not on the use of the property
but on the nature of the ownership of the
property. And that is not the way zoning
[controls] are supposed to operate," Mr.
Harvey said, adding that BU ''will challenge
the validity of the ordinance in an appropriate proceeding."
Mr. Harvey said he' couldn't quantify
what impact the removal requirement and
the related licensing and inspection fees will
have, but there is no doubt, he said, that for
BU the impact will be "negative and substantial."
According to the ordinance, the issuance
of removal permits to nonprofit institutions
will be permitted only if "no significant
hardship will be imposed" on the tenants
residing in the building involved; if "no significant aggravation of the ~hortage of decent rental housing accommodations, especially for families of low and moderate income and elderly people on fixed income,
will result from the removal"; if there is "no
significant negative or adverse effect on the
neighborhood"; and if "the benefits to the
public institution seeking the permit will
outweigh clearly and convincingly the adverse effects of such removal."
The licensing provision requires an annual
inspection to determine that dormitories
meet the state building, sanitary and zoning
codes and sets a licensing fee of $50 per
building and $5 per bed. In addition, the
ordinance requires an annual inspection by
the fire department, the fee for which is set

~-°'--

---~~--

5 .s. ::;

Kept On Coming

::s ~3::~i::g

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Continuedfrom Page 1 ·
of the limousine. He waved and·was
"TI!ese cops are wise guys," I then .whisked inside in a flurry of
thought. to myself. Walking down irenchcoats. My attempt to follow was
tow.ard the pu'b, I bumped into a man , cut short by a police officer.
"No one else inside! Get back!" he
whograbbed me and shouted in my.
eax...'..'.lh:e Presidentjs'goin' in the ptlb .shouted. ·
.
for :a beijr!"
'
· ·..
··.
The .on,lookers had to be pushed
P~pple Were r11nning out of the back again .. One of them was Leslie
stores and towards the Eire. Shouts of Stickney, 35; owner of Adams St.
''WhereJs he,?'.':~11.d 'What'.s going Pharmacy. ' .
.
.on?" coµJd be hf::~rd; I steppedJnto the . "I c,ni't believe it!. Why would. the
doorway of the Adams Fi11h Market, Presidimt ofthe Uriited States go into
neit to the<pub; fo keep from getting . the Eire Pub? Con1e .on .. {I' is just
knocked 'down. More onlookers something no one dould ever picture
emerged ffoi~ cars in the Purity Su- . happening," said,
.
,
preme parking fot and ran to the pub.
One uniformed' figure looked
· Another group ofcars screeched to. temporarily lost in the confusion;
cl halt in froi}t of the pub letting out a
''Over here, general!" one of the men
, supply cif men w~th earphones over in earph1mes yelled his way.
In~tphH1g shortbairc:uts. They c&rried
. The j'gene,rld'.'
carrying what
walkie'.talkies'.iand noticeable bulges< )opked Ji~e a ~turdy,, cf~rk brown
.. tinder· the Wt side of their trench travel qase. This was the s11pposed
'.:coats. The 'bulges were notice11ble. ''football," the 'piece of luggage with
. en~ug;h tpj~ep my own han~ from the portabl~ panic buttons, ·les~ t~e
reachmg)Q$ide my coat for as much as' President miss a nuclear war while m
'. a concealed pencU and notepad.
Dorchester.·
1,
• ·. >•·AJl Jt~liW' ,one oUheni bellowed.
''Just think, the President could /,
tEveryohe'.back! Come 011! Everyone blow up the world b.etween rounds/' - ,
move .hack!'' Growing numbers· of Michael McDonali:l; 19; of Dorchester; .
"everyone'' were how'being crunched marvelled from safe distance.
together, sfretching their µeeks to get a
A police .lwlicopter now ·circled
g/impse ofwhatwas-to come> · ·
· overhe.ad. People were still running
"Here they come!" someone down the .street, including Linda
· . '
shouted, and people began to cheer as D' Agostino.
the glimpse spread. . ··
·
"This ·is unreal!" .she said. "I just
The sound of clapping got louder as· wish Ihad· a camera. He looks ·better
. Jh~i ,:Pf#std(,lntia] fuotorcade, ~p- in. person than hedoespn TV, Eixcept
proathlfd frtJin Granite Avenue and. he's a little shorter."
finally docked in front of the Eire Pub After about five minutes the lim ·
to shoµts of "W,elcome to Dot, ousine was back in place in. front of
Ronnie!"

. the Eire Pub.. Secret service men
"He better bow his head when he were starti.µg to .push back the·
g9Eis in there. Thisis Dorchester," a crowd. agaiii, then the President ,
police officer said to part of the crowd emerged in anotqer flurry of trench- /
he was ordering toward the fish coats.
market. .
'
.
"How was itT' came ashout. "What
The long black presidential limou- did you have?"
·
sine pulled up cinto the sidewalk,
In a flash the President was back in
followed by assorted vehicles filled the limousine .. Police pushed the
with more secret service men, offjcials cheering crowd back from the street,
and ·media personnel. Before the . aqd the motorcade pulled away with a
Hmousine even stopped i:nore men wave from the President. Even then;
with earphones and walkie-talkies people were stilJ running down the
were by its side. . .
.
street to see ifit was real
'There was a loud applause and
'(<;:hrisMiller,1~.Jivescin.MinotSt.andisa
shouting as the president 1_· ,
stepped out JournalfsQI.. major at Suffolk ll1JimtU1Yi

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BOSTON i.EDGER
BROOKLINE, MA.

w. 15,000

New

SEP

6 1982

Eng1and
Newsdip

,--------r------~-- -

Q..1.CU

I

vres

S9mebody's playing. dirty
.on.posh Temple Street

Tre~27-

By Joan_ Axelrod
Temple Street stretches from
Cambridge Street to the State House,
showing two distinct personalities
along th_e way. They're the [aces of old
and · new Beacon Hi'll, of rooming
houses and condos. The window ooxes
and freshly painted doors of the ',)new"
Temple Streel however, don't reach all
the way to the top of the hill. Thfy end
at number 54. a shabby roomil'lg house
a few yards away from the State House,
. directly across_ from S1fffolk Universify.
The insioe .of 54 Temple St. looks like
a bomb hit it after years of neglect. The
top floor is completely gutted. Unsanded. unfinished wood provides a
temporary staircase - the originhl said
to be-knocked out in a scuffle. The wall
along the entry way - the scene of
another alle.~ed scuffle - bears a hole
the size of a fist.
The trained eyes--of-"B'Os'ttfn's-·-.o
building inspectors have noticed otfier
things about 54 Temple St. There are
the· 44. housing code violations everyt bin.~ from leaky sinks to defective
electric outlets, broken windows, and
. insufficient heat.
Those aren't the only problems.
The roon1inghouse, according to two
tenants. has been visited by thugs who
are doin~ their best to scar.qenants off
the prc>_perty since new owners
Frederick Good1mm Joseph Cicala took
over. The tenants, primarily gay men,
. say workmen at the site have pushed
. then1 around. called tnem "faggots,"
and even heat one boarder with blackjacks.
Goodman and Cicala deny any harassment They
- also deny any plans to convert the building to condominiums. Neverthele~s. housing court judge
George Daher has ruled consistently in favor of the
1
tenants; nrst with a restraining order to protect
them from harassment, then with a contempt cita~
.tion against t_he landlords for violating.the restraining order.
.. . , _
<..; ,
.The problems began under the former t'ancllady;
Rosalie Greenwald, who lent Goodman and Cicala
the money for the building. Sargent Harold Grover,
an officer for. the Suffol\{. University police,
remembers_ several shouting matches between
Greenwald and her tenants' - arguments noisy
enOu{:!;h to attract the Boston Police Department
John DuBois. one of the tenants, remembers.
::---Greemvala padlockfrig -fellow teriant!s door on·
Christmas day. ··she'd throw people out without due
process." he contends. Dubois i_s a former organizer
for the Massachusetts Tenants Union::- and Mas-

a

of

I
10n

~es

i
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fPhot':) by Fred Mirliani)

JOHN DUBOIS

. That same. day,· according to DuBois, G<>_odm,an
and. Cicala agreed to relocate one of the tenants if 'h,e
agreed to va.cate in two weeks. The workm~n then
proceded to, demolish the former tenants apartment; throwing wall debris and furniture down the ,
stairs: they took axes and began demolishing furniture on the sidewalk, according to DuBois,
That was when tenants began withholding rent.
On Mav :-3. DuBois and Fox arrived in Housing
Court. askin~ tor a restraining order; The juctge asquiesced: Cicala. Goodman, and their employees
were prohibited from harassing tenants and friends
of tenants and threatening 1tlleir "quiet enjoyment."
At the same time, the tenan~ registere.ct another .
cofupiainf,--niey. accused. Goodman ·and Cicala of · .
violatinp; City Ordinance 10, a regulation against
harassment in the case of condo conversion drown
......... 1,...._ ..... i...,... ,..,~ .... , , ____ _
-,Q
.f'I 1

_ .. -

.........

..,_

~~;;,-·Th~1;~;;;t~:

prim~ily gay men,
say workmen at the site have pushed
. them around. called them "faggots,"
and even beat one boarder with blackjacks.

......

.

fPhotc:_> by Fred Mirliani)
Goodman and Cicala deny any harassment. They JOHN DUBOIS
-. also deny any plans to convert the building to condominiums. Neverthele!:!s, housing court judge
That same day, according to DuBois, ~dll¥ln
George Daher has ruled consistently in favor of the
and Cicala agreed to relocate one of the tenants ifh.e
tenants; first with a restraining order to protect
agreed to vacate in two weeks. The workm~n then
them from harassment, then with a contempt citaproceded to demolish the former tenants apart.tion against the landlords for violating-the restrainment. throwing wall debris and furniture down the ing 01"9er.
..
.
, ...
stairs: thev took axes and began demolishing furThe· problems began under the former t'andlady,
niture on the sidewalk, according to DuBois. · Rosalie Greenwald, who lent Goodman and Cicala
That was when tenants began withholding rent.
the money for the building. Sargent Harold Grover.
On Mav 3; DuBois and Fox arrived· in Housing
an officer for. the Suffol\{ University police,
Court, askin.~ for a restraining order; The jlictge asremembers several shouting matches between
quiesced: Cicala. Goodman, and their employees
Greenwald and her tenants· - arguments noisy
were prohibited from harassing tenants and friends
enough to attract the Boston Police Department.
of tenants and threatening ,their "quiet enjoyment."
John DuBois. one of the tenants, remembers.
At the same time, the tenants registered another _
: Greenwald padlockfrig a -fellow terianfs door on·
cofnpiain[ Tiiey accused Goodman and Cicala of Christ.mas day. "She'd throw people out without due
violatinp; City Ordi,nance 10, a regulation against
process." he contends. Dubois is a former organizer
harassment in the case of condo conversion drown
for the Massachusetts Tenants Union=- and Masup by the City Council last year. The ordinance calls
sachusetts Fair Share, a man well-versed in tenants'
for a fine of at least $500 for "violation of the privacy,
rights. At his instigation, one of the tenants filed
harassment. ·intimidation, threat, or coercion of a ·
criminal charges against Greenwald, but the suit
tenant." Clerk RoberLLeWis, however, didn't think
· . was later dropped.· The tenants dairh they made a
the tenants had sufficienLproofof harassment. (It
• trade~off with Greenwald so that she. would. drop . was the first time he had been approached with a
larceny charges against. John Fox (not his i:eal
City Ordinance 1O complaint - an indica.tion that
namer:· a teµant who also acted as Greenwald's
few tenants know it exists,)
buildinp; manager. (He was in charge of collecting
The nexL day. Fox was ~king down tlle street,
rents from tenants who had failed - or refused - to
toward the State House, when he ran. into one of the
pay Greenwal~ q.irectly.)
. _.
workmen. "That's him," Fox remembers hitn telling
Fox is a c't>n tral figure in the troubles at 54 Temple
a friend. ·''Tfiat's the one we're going to get." ·
St. A 2Rvear-old former rock star who sports a New
Three davs later. the landlords and tenants met
Wave hairstyle: he had his own run-in with the law
again in court. They agreed on a moratorium on
two years aio when he was caugqt in a drug bust. He
work inside the apartments (despite. the houst,nghas been on probation ever since that conviction. A
code violations) because of tenants' concerns about
; ..court appearance on rent larceny charges could have
safety.
been narmful. even though he claims no s~ch crime
A few weeks ·later the tenants received eviction
toC>k place. (Greenwald was contacted for her side of
notices for ~on-payment of rent
th~ stqry. but declined to answer any questions on
All was quiet for the next month or so. Then, on
tl:.e su~ject. saying the inquizy amounted to harasJune 28. two men allegedly came to the door, asking
sment. l
.
for Fox. and were told he was out.
.·· Tradi.np: charges ~s npthing new for Greenwa!d
A few hours later, DuBois_ says, there was a knock
· and her tenants. hi a court appearance in February,
on his door. · - two men walked into his room. said
'Greenwal~onsented fo a restraining order initiated
;,Hi." then pushed him onto the flooq
DuBois
by Fox. ~ . agreed not to evict him without due
,
(kzntinuhl on page 1~ _
process anil not to enter his room without prt~r
llllllllll.~"'11111··. . . .
notice. Tl;le landlady had a habit of banging on Fox s
door at '7:30 Saturday morning to collect rent
checks.
'
·
Two. months after. the restraining order was issued ·ap;ainst Greenwald, Ule building_ was sold to
Goodman avid Cicala That's when workmen began
\ knoc~inp; down wAf!s and ripping out closets - as
. part ·of a renovation plan, the landlords(Silid, but tee
nants weren't so sure. They complained to the
;buiidin¢ department that an illegal condo conversfon was taking place, but the building department
wouldn't intervene. since it wa_s impossible to determine the purpose of the renovations on the basis of
the work that had been done.
.
Then~ on May 1, the conflict between tenants and
landlord bt>gan to escalate: Fox says two workmen
arrived at the building with Cicala and Goodma~.
and.that they later pushed him against the edge of
the stairs. ta~mting him with cries of"faggot." Then,
he says. the workmen tried to follow him into his
apartrnent. poking him rep~atedly in the chest and
braMin~ ahout their polotical connections.

r.============a~\-

BOSTON lEDGER
BROOKLINE, MA.

w. 15,000

6 198'l

SEP

New
Engiand
Newsdip;

.

.

j

~9meone's. playi~g, irty on Temple ·st.
' -;ontinuedjrom page 1~ { -

brought ?n more I.ear. The( re department declared
A few days after our interview with the landlord,
says. th<'y p11llt>d out blacltjacks and started whippIt suspl<'lotlf\
· .. · ,
. .
Jim Sliva. identifying himse.~f ~s a friend of
Ing him. am! didn't stop until he yelled, "Okay, okay,
.. The <'asf' of 54 Temple S is far from over, Cicala . Goodman's. called the Ledger. Hes Just ·not that
I'll moV<' out."
a~9 Goodman ~ave begun .e eviction process all type of person," says Silva about the charges leveled
Dubois's shoe was full of blood by the time the
o\{,er again. hoping to wirt. t~ · Judge's approvi;tl this
'against his friend. "He's a happy-go-lucky kind of
ambulan<'f' arrived. A few hours later he was at Mass.
Um~ .~round.
(
.
person. Ht> likes to tell Jokes. He likes to make people
Tt.}f tenants. In tum, are h<qp iqg for a speedy set.
happy."
General Hospital with.20 stitches in his leg, ready to
tleme~t:
.
.
t I
According to Silva. Goodman, who owns four or
go back to court.
·
.Desp.1.t<' his_ setback in courtJ~oodman insists t?,e - five buildings in Lynn, is a model landlord. Each of
When.th<' ls:'ue o.f the assau.It came up in court,
co.mplamts.. o f ha.r.assmen.t a.re~J.o¥ty erroneous.
.
the buildings 'is at.tractive and well maintain.ed. he
Judge J?ahf'r f?und Cicala alld ·Goodman tn conThe stri~{es of beatings and f r~ats. h«; says, have
says: Goodman has rarely had trouble with any of
tempt of murt for violating the restratntng ordet;As
been ~abrl~ted by tenants wh: haven t paid one
his tenants throughout his 20 years as landlord.
p.unishm<'nl.· ·.he dismissed aU pending' e.victtons
p·e.nnys.· rf'n!;\and have:d~>ne ndt·h.· Ing but compatn
He's only apl?eared in court a few times - each time
against tt'nants at 54 Temple St., telling the tena,nts'
since.day I. '
· ·
on behalf of tenants being disturbed by other teattornt"y ,To<' Ross, ''I don't want any more violence · Goodman insists that he has, o plans for condo
nants.
.
dow.n t. her<'...
.
·
..· .copve~ion: he ju.~t want~ to _!>rtng··.t;the b~i.lding back
. Sendin.f!. hit men tsn't G.oodm~·.s style. ·.·He'd. say
.
.
.
to its original cond:ttion. Theontiway to restore the
'let's sit down and talk about this. This place ts a
That ";as the end of ~he alleged ass~ults, attacks · buHdJng i~ to gut l}Je whole thtn'g from scratch. It
mess: let me help you move,' says Silva.a real-estate
and-thrC',11s. ButU wasn t the end of the troubles.On
has to be lumigated:\I~ smells te~ble These people
investor for the past 25years. "He'dprobablycracka i
July 10. at. 12:59 a.m., a fire broke out in the rubbish
won't let; us go into th~ apartmentto clean up. They
joke. He'ci talk someone to death before he'd harass! I
bin. No on<' was hurt, nothin~dam~ed, bllltthe fire
want a lref' ride to Uvedn their owp filth."
them. If anything. he talks too much."
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I

MASSACHUSETI'S

LAWYERS WEEKLY
BOSTON, MA.

w. 14,000

AUG 2 1982

New
England.
Newsdip

,y·

" -<Ju1J .P1 jltt,tt.,i
• •
"'rf"'1f(A.,,
·.· ·i •

·

.

,

United St.a es
.

, ...

Searches Of·CQ.ll.t9in .rs lh A·utOmol,il.es

!•

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:~i,bIJi~.:

On -Jun{1; 1982, amid unu~ual fanfare .in
- , - by Jo~epb p. t
..
the prevailing 'plurality ,,m
'.rile .\
t~e.popular press tile Supreme.Court the
- ,"
··
thrOO.j1;1stices/\~hit~,MarshallapgJ:lteJl!lan,
./'the car) tlley, may search the passenger who Jotned Justice Stewart's opnuon,jntftobUnited States decided Un~~d States v •. RQss, c~ded. A preyailm,g plurality of four·,!usticesr
50
~110. As~ often happens with cases held that a container may be seized ,in.these t¢ompartment,9,f the car. This includes con- bins were the dissenters:fu .ft.oss: -TQerefor.e,
in the Constitutic>nal-Criminal Law area it is circumstances· but not searched witliotit ··Ii fl.liners •. It in#iudes -glove .. compa~ments, alth~u.ghRoss over.ruled ~bb,~s9itly eleven
~sjible (o ·assess the problei,:i presented by warrant unless in effect its transparency ,or :~~ons9les, .luggJge.; etc ... Jt •does not. mclude months. to the day. after, 1t. was :decided, .no
' W>'ss in 11pocaiyptic "fascism,, is around the configuration revealed its contents. a'he 1·1trun~s. OJ;; Pflii,$UIDably, .the recessed. com- _jus!fce }epudia~ed. ~ ~ss;JPlrt~ipgih~,':!1a~
corner" terms or .in terms of "untying the ChiefJustice concurred in the result without :.p~rt,nent of ,R#b~ins. SpEicifically'it includes said in lwbJ,ins. . . : , , - . (, ,, , , <'· .,
- Hands of the police.';. It seems, however;, that opinion. Jqstice Powell wrote a crucial ·conlt<>ri's.1j. ~c.k~t although it see_m.s, cle·ar--that
..-The· ~ajority jn .)toss:: ~mijfi!3$i~cl',:;t~~t
tlie 'Sµprefue ·. Court. has si.rpply, pl'ovided. a curring 01>inion. It shot,dd ~ note~ that,Ius- -• the ;,.. same .jacket could .not -·. have ·Ileen historically warrantless · searcttes ,of(cq11c
· comparativel;Y,dear answer ti,) a:debatable lice7Poweil has an e~asperlitmg inclinali9.n ..-:sea:fched1,witl:ibut a warrant'if Belton had veyaQCeS always _were ta~~n\,ti ,i.Jiqlu.<Je
question. This may be one ·of thoses -cases to write concurring opinions that cloud'what
~h:an1utoniobile , .container case rather · searches of containers.- {11, .~ijqitiQJ!, they
where the arguments' on both sides were the Court has done in cases wtiere bi's opillion · than a searQ"h l.ncident case. ,
- .·
stressed that searches o( a, earls trunk::or
'closely balanced arid the ·removal of apt- has been decisive. Althoughit is nota'tppic ; ~samatte.rufabstracttheoryRobbinsand glove compartment, im,qu~sti~ti,al>iy;,~r~
bigtiity was more important than ·what the that readiJy excjtes popular bite}:"esttheJ:on- . Belton
not irreconcilable. Belton says mitted under the automobile exception, im:
'decision· was. ·
currihg opinions of,Justice:PoweU cQi_is\l'tute .. : th~t the;po•ife,ha,ve the rigµt t,o prevent ac- plicate - priv.acy concerns as -- mti.ch 'as. :
-'InRosstheCourtheldthatwherethepolice one;, of the truly crucial i;lflue~~es ~:~on- . ~~Ss..0.11 the'.ija,rt of arr~stef!~ t~1weapons or searches of containers.;.. The dissenters ;
dest,ruc~ibl¢,,evjdegcei Thus, the police may argued that containers found, witllfu a\ltq~ :
haveprobable cause to search an automo,bile stittitionaU,aw ·in th~ past ten years;. 1q1as
.including· 'containers such as bag~ 'filld not ~eri an 'alt~gE!tlier. J>enign irifluerict~ In ; search tlifpassenger co~partment ofcars, mobiles should be•freat~d'-the :same ;fi:s:=t:oriL .r
--pouches;therein, and where pursuarifto the Robbhi:s Justice Powell stated that a war.r:ant · incJtid~ :contain~rs; but 11of tnmksi Tne ta~f!rs ,foµn~_;~ywher~f ~J~ 'VA~t:.eJtsl<:9ntf i
~·automobile exception"they are justified in shoqld be·'required "~riiy' wJ:ienthecori\~J~er ' fo~ d9?il i),qt s_~yJ~~t,.~~re: is~_110.. priv~cy, partments ~t~gral to a car,~h.~~f~~~;,pf~~f ;
searching the automobile without a warrant, il? one that ~.n~raQr~!"Ves :~s a rep<jMWry . J,Dt~resfm the J:!ontam:ers; ,rather,- that .the lems of mob1hty and safe!(eepm~ oHfie,car 1
theymay'alsifsearchtheconfainerswithout for~rsonaleffe¢tsorthathas.b¢ensealedin ; privacylntef~~fisoiitweighedbythene~do( itself;,
'· <·, ·( .,rt ' i
a warrankThey are' not-thereforE{ obliged a Inanner _manif~stinf' a' tea~o.nable, e,x:- . 'the police fo conduct_an]mm~i~te search;
-_:W.bat About.Occupants? r:;::·,:·i I
- 'm~rely to Seizethtfc'ontainers and' hold them - ~ctatJ~ifi~atJhefontenis .Will n?fbe .PI>ell. to . Robbins turned riot oi:ithese principles but on · •.There.is finally .one probJem,not.d1~cu~seq I
pending the obtl!ini_ng ofa warrant. The fight public scrutiny." . . ·
.. ._ . --· ·_· · .
_ , the scope of t~e ~utomobile exception and the in I_ros.$. Now. that. thecautom~bile' e;eeptio.u/
tosearchtheautomobilewithprobablecause
·Justice Powell viewed'Robbins a~ having : privacy interest in containers. It),~. the val.1dates. se_arches of contamersrwhat\ot
I
without awarrant ~ntails the right to search been litigaW<i as a container
rather than ': Robbins Court beta that while the.containers searches of the occupants, the ,ultimate I
the containers pI."ovided that the probable ·as involving the scope of. the automobile ex- ·t may be _seized if there is probable cause they ','cojJtairiers"? Traditionally
a.i.tfomobil~
1
cause._~xterids to the containers as well.
ception. Hehiilted, howeyer,thathe would be '\ may not be searched without a warrant.
. exce1itio11 rule ha.s ~a<J a,~l'.al!~~,,
· ·. · om/
~eference To Prior Cas!'s Necessary
willing to join iil a rethinking of that question 't
Co~bined Cases Confusing
, of-w_·.hitQ· 1_·.s/.cop_s.t1e·r~pl~-,le.J~ t.h. .
.
...
.f"J'
·~~rtanc~ of !his seem~g!y ~arr~w .in; S0¥1~;;subse~1J~ll~"ca~:~· ~Y::}b~tJf~~~tbE!) : ~veq;J'-:9n~ ~gf~~J~~l:~1'.~....~ W,ldl:Je~.tpn< '· 'tlerit, thafthe"right to ~arch an a"·
'ile
g~~~o~ CaAA,Cltbe llild~rstoo9.:w1thout i:~(etf , ; ,D1Str1ct .of ,Columb1a·eircmt;,,l!m· bancf,liad, ~;t;.,are,1tfieo~tmally·'; compa.t.1ble .the, .practical " .. doe~:;~1f ii,1.ciyg~:>tfie · right to ··search •occi.t-/
erice_ to certain prior Supreme Court deci- already decided Ross and the case was re.,· -· result'of tbe combination of the t\\'.O is con-· :'panti;'.even,when t8e-evidehce that is th~oba
sions, particularly two companion cases de- ferred to in Justice Stewart's and JU~tice_ fusing, anllmalous aiid _per~ll:p(alittlE!_ab- ject of the. search cotild easily b(;l co.nC:ealed
cided at tb~:.;<:lc,se of Jast term, Robbins v.. -. Powell's.'. oplriic,i!s in RobbJii~, Very ~~oon /c,,· sw.-d. R~hµtt~ in essentia1,ly .s~Uar ca~es.. )>11,:the person Qfatj:oc'cuparitr'.J!He.'(:)9J\~'te~
Califonilli,,: ifil> ;S.CC 2841 (1981) and :New.· · _ thereafter the 'Supreme Court granteci(cer"': :. -'seemt.o'turn:on distinctions}haf ar.e11otobvi- -ferred to :that- -limitation! af>proviliglyi::futtt!
Y~r~ v,. "';Beito~,- ~lOLS;Cfa 2860 ., (198H. The •.. tfor.a,ri ,. 'in . IJo"s~; ,,spec#fically'lo coµsJ~er.: \'. -'i}usly):~iilteMo Fourth .l\mendment privacy analogizedtl) it quite,recently>'. See Ybaria v,I
te~ion between thoselwo cases-undoubtedly. .whether ~_bbins ~boi.tld be r~_onsiderei,:J..
J ,go_Pceqi~,·lt d9es not help that six of tl1e nine.. Winois, 444 U.s. ··~ •
~197? >
:'.;he1pr~c~ieanni~
is :ah<mipoftant·piitt ofthe·exJjlanatjon for: - Three Justices d.is~nted in ilotibins, con- ;;;. Justices believe__d thatthe two cases·should portance of the hm1t~tion 1tcdunm1sh:ect1by·
th~.. ~ec1~i~~Jn.-~_ss';. ~ltµoµ~b surpr;sin~ly · eluding generally- that-the •autQ,mobile ex, - i . ~ ' de!!!d~i<n~e -same way although they- di- th~'fact that.often the occupant is under ar~[
.none.~fJ)ie .QpinIO,llS. lll :RoS!kFefer· to·tru,s. -. ·. ception SUpP?rtS the:.5.~arch of containers
Vided ~ee ~othree OQ. wfia,t•that way shOu}d., rest_.and .mayi ~.se~hed '(>~~9~~,;lo. th~\
·- ·perhaps •more important ,and· also uriinen- · the automobile;
. _ . ,., -· , _ , )·C:}>e. ·.':':t -:f" ,:·
_
. ,_, ar.re.st.~ut t~~ s1tul!.t19pw;her.~llieN.!,~.,ptQptioned; in ~.~s i~.-,~~at ~t the_ do_se. of ~~~t . i-,::,,Ne~ r!,t~:v::Belw.~. decided<th,tfsariletdaYrtt: .. ~~4,~tb,~ Coµrt:\\'.aS llllCO~f9!1abl~
~~le ~all~ to sear~h an ;ati.t~i'fiobUeibttt:•not
_
yea,re'stenn J;ustree St~wart, who wrote. ~he : J1.s:Ro.bbµa~.neJU1ly, a:t>,the e.11d ,ot,last y: ( s~.~tl,J,~t
9,!ll~tign of ~J,,b~.!iE!i!JP~J~l'9J.J;JU19 _:~pr@~b~c::il!.!.~:-tQiaa.'e$ti:'1Jhfl
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"'CClll W LW-UU~l UllSLlllCUUlllS ma~ l;lfe nOtoDVlYork. v. Belton,)01 $;Ct 2860 (1980. The · . tforari ',, in Ross; .,specjficaJJY "io. ¢0psid~r- :, · ()tisl~ii;"elatectto FourthAmendihent privacy
te~ion between those two casesundoubtedly . whet.her' Rollbms. ~hould be r~onsidered. ; , ;', :,gop¢~rns. rt d9es nothelpthat six of :the nine
i~ }1i1 iJnpoitant ·part of the· explanation for · . Three Justices dis~nted in Robbins, conf . Justices believe!Hhat,.the two ;cases should
th~. c,lec'isiori iiJ. Ross; although surp~singly clud!°'g generallrt~at ,_the autpll'!,obile e~,:. ·. · ~·Q~!,!id~<:rthe ·sam,e' waf al~ough th.~y· di, Qorie'.ot_itie .QpinionsJn ~ss:refer to ·this. cept10n supports tfle..search of containers Ill': ·.•·· v1ded three to.three 011wlia,t that ~ay should
Perhaps mor,e important and also unmen- the automobile;
··
.
. . . · ·t,:
be,:.-; . .,; , , .
..·.. . .
. ·.
tioned in Ros~ i~ .that l;lt the clo_~ of ~a~t , ,:;; Ne\f \,;~~~ Y.':Bel~p, decidEidt~eisariie da ,. ,. . , . U~;ftll1Coµrt ~aS}:1llCOJ,l1{9!1:abl~ ~~t~
, year' S-term· uushee. St!;lwart, who wrote the , ~·:~bb.lns,neJll'ly, at,the end,,ot"1astyea ·,,~Jbe
. ;it1~>0- of: ~1,bjjis.Jl.OO"~~lJfQ:,JillO~
~vYH

terred tO that Jitnit'atiO!l apprO\ifugly,'iartd
analogized toit quite;recently'. See Ybilrfla v,
Illinois, 444 U ;S. 81H1979)Jl'he;practiijafihiportance of the .!imit~tion is; diminislieµf:iby
thf fact that often the c:,ccup'anUs under,ar,rest .and may be ::selirebed :pur$ii~t~t<fthe
, arrest. ButtMsitw.!-tt1m_w:l:l~~JM~'.ij:ct~i/ob,
·' ,ll_~1e ~aUl'!e to; ~arch,an aut~~bile,ib.U~no,t
,.,prg!;)ap!~\C;l~~tq; ..
·

[\~;~t~ife!fki~!:i~~-i:::Jl§~M·•,
1.~Jr~i!=i}~;1.~~,,=,)'~~;.~~::···.··=;r;~i=1:t~
I ~bee st~ppecf th~: :defendapt•s .car beca~s,e.

.coca¥te.: The. C9urt: by~ yote of ,sixto·thr.ee, .·<Qpon a very,·s9bstant1al parcotics,tJp. A' re-. "gurski; 386 Mass: 385 (1982) /a;cas,e'a1soMted
he h~d,~n,di'ivingerratically/The officers ... · \\iith_. Jtis~i<!e Ste}V.art, wri_ting ~or:the- major- :yolver was}ound. I.toss was arre,ted. AdE:l- in the press. There is n<>' 1Qc.6Ji~~t~ncy ,be/ stnelledJtfarij:uana·smoke and this ledtothe .. .ity:,cupheld the sear.ch. Pespite tile similarity , te<!tive. Qpened the. trunk,, discovering in .a ·• tween the,two. cases A~ -poc1gursld ,ai, pplice
I· search of th~-car ..Du~g .the .course of the . oUhis.case to ~b~iii~.:the Courfvfow~ci.Be- : ,::closed brown :paper' bag what. was later de.,__ ..officer responded ,.to· '.a: te'pQrt :of i~ete~#tS
search t~e police:uncovered a recessecl lug-· · lton.quite differently, f_or the Co~ ~lton Jermined to be heroin. He also found· a zip- .· activity in a' van in a publif.P, . ·• -,. 1 "'; •.fie
gag¢ cotnpa,rtment ;and.. removed "~.W<? w1:1s a "sear«:!h.Jnciqeµt>t case. T.he .search ·::;;pered red leather pouch containing $3;200 in · officer extendecl .his nead 'iiisJd,." " .,
:. y
packag(:lswrapped in green opaqli"' plasgcY · was upheld on tli~t basµ; and,therefi>re the - ·:cash. Belton i~· not .dis~ussed µi Ross. except open. side dqor a)id ·obs'er-ved'.n~ftp,,,{ ;~ofThe-.packages·containeqma:rijuana. .
automobile exceptio11 was not,discussed:"
"for a briefreference in Justice Powell's con- fensesthat(ltf'would.nothavebeeri'.able,tosee
'i\lit_omobile ,:, Exception' . The ·.· problem
.
··,>'Bright Line' Provided? · ·. ..
C:ijiting opmion. This is no doubt because the . had he hot p1iysica!}y intrud~ 'intoJhe<ya:it ..
po~~ ~ ltobJ,ins for: the.Court :yvas. the same
When there is ~ yalid, in-custody arrest the · search of tirunk is explicitly outside the scope Apart from. a di~c11ssi9n of, !i~t~p<µpg?Jhe
ofthe·Belton. rule. The Court was .certainly Coµrf main1y·concf1)ded th~(thet(liad ·~n
ope tttat th(:l'Cc111rt conf!'Oritedotice agairi,1:md poli<!,e hav«;! . the right.to ~onduct a·sear<;Jl intesolved,differently .-· this"-term in Ross; cident to arrest .. The may searchtheJterson
:aware; however, that Ross rests alongside a search, an ·intrusioii into·an area,where
whether the "automob~e exception" vali- of the arrestee and the area .within· his briBelton a l~t. more comfortably tljan Robbins . the defendants had a rf:!asonabl~ expect~tion
.d1cl.'.
.
·
,.
· ·· of privacy; furtber,. th1:tt su<;h'anJntr,us'.i!':i~. ,
dates searches of containers. Robbins was mediate control for weal)(>ps and deContainer Search Validated ' ·
not based orfptobable ca11se and in the abnot litigated as a search incident t~ -!irrest structible evidence. In 1973 the Court ·held
~ase..
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that the police have the right to a very thorThe majority in Ross simply overruled senceof awarrantorexigentcircumst~e!S,
. The automobile .exception,. traceable his~ ough sejll'Cb of t}?,e, person eve~ in cases
~bbins and held that the automobile (:lXcep~ , \Vas ·.not constitutionally perm{ssibf~::·:';l'he ,
to_ricimy· to warrantl~ss· sel:lrche's of various where the arrestee cou_ld not be carrying any
tion . . validates the ,.search of . containers judge at the suppressiop bearing had reli~ ,
forms ofconveyance, pr9perLy ·speaking-in~ evidence and there'is.noteason to suspect he
Without a waqant when the probable cause on both the Fourth Amendinenfand:arL14 of, -:
volve:S the combination of. probable cause is armed; The generaUdea wasthattheory
·extendstobutjsnotlbnitedtotheeontainers. the Declaration of Riglits·onhe"I(fissaehtc
anti, ex~g~nt ¢irctiinstan<Jes, wjtb lesseFex- _· • would have to bend t~the practic1d n~e~sity
It is q9~wort,hy who constjtgt~the majority: · setts Constitution'. lf is noLentirel;f,clear, · '
pectation of ,.privacy as· an underJy~~ ra· .of providing a "bright).ine" rule that police . ·.in.Jtoss, in which, like Robbin~ and ~elton, whether in. this part qfthe opinion· t,I\~ ;$utionale; .The courts are quick to find exigent can applye~ily in difficult on the spot situathe Court divided six to three.cThe six cons · p~meJudicial Court also relied on,the Con~
circbmstap¢es; inthe·caseofautomobiles. In . tions. (Ch. 508 of the Acts of 1974), which
sisted of Justices Stevens, Blackmwi_ and stitution of the·Cominonwealth; Iri·anyevent
a9dition,;'.even the _Supreme ,Court refers;,· amends G\L.ch. 276, §1 wa~ a respon~ to
Rehnquist who had disseJ1ted in Robbins and · the ''auto_01obHe exception,'.'.. pr~perly uh~
loos~ly it; seems, to c¢rtain_ car~taker, in~ those .cases and era,ses the bright line in
were obviously eager to join·a new majority;
derstoo.d, was rt()t involvedirilh~ <:ase, mu<;h
ventory search cases where probable cause . Massachusettsto .a,n extent that i~ not easy to
the ,Chief Justice who had concurred in 1wtt:. less the "container'; problem of Ross.
·
is notrequired 'as involving the automobile ascertain. The. statute .may be of ci>µsiderbins but expressed willingness to reconsider· · Editor'.s note: .Joseph D; ,Cronin is a·proex~eption.
.
· .
'
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able importance and· has received re,
inacasesquarelypfesentingthequei;tionof fessor. of law at .Suffolk Universi~y~Law
''In'. sorrle. cases before Robbins~ the Court ·markably little treatment in the reported: the scope of the automobile exception; arid,
School where·he teach~s a vaMety of CC>\U'ses ·cc
hag held that opening without warrant a opinions).
·
·
_
finally Justice O'Connor who replaced·Jus-. · in the area of Constitutional Law. · ·.
··'
footlocker and a suitcase taken from,auto~
Belton pro.v.ides a "bright line" for ~he
tfoe Stewart, who had written the opinion for
· ·· ' ~·--mobiles violatedtheFourth Amendment. In .~earch.of the area ai;pect of search incident, ,..
those cases; however' the connection be- atleast where automobiles.a~involved, just .- .·,
tween the-containers-and the cars was cas'ual as the'1973 Ca!!eS provided the ,bright line for ·
and Jhe offieers had
interest in the car the search of.the person; The Court.in Belton
other than to'rei:nove the containers. There- neld that factually as a general proposition,·
·· . fol'e, · thoi;e ·cases. were easily seen as· con- · · auto01obile~ ate ~ithin the area of control of
tainer cases requiring a warrant rather than recent occupants now uitder. arrest in the
automobile<cases where the warrant would · !laine general ar~a. In addition,. the polic.~
pOssibly hE! excused: In Robbins tire search of ·cann:ofbe expected to make nice calculations
[ t~e containers was .part ofan ov.erall search ~bout particular auto.mobiles whe.n t~ey are
of the car and thus the question whether m the proceps of makmg a search mc1dent to
containers could be searched under such cir- arrest. Therefore,. the Court converted. the
cuqistances was squarely presented.
factual generalization into a bright line per
- ·Ambiguously' Decided
serule. Th~ rule has the followingcontours.
· If the question:was squarely presented it Whenth~ police arrest the ,occupants ()fa car
was': only obliquely and ::ambiguouslr de- (even though the occupa.nts are no longer in .

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poes TV do courts jllstice?

mAIIICllf.l

DEDHMl,11.
D. B.018



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By Larry Grady
Staff Writer
IDBleDI _
CAMBRIDGE - 0~. ~rif Hussai~ and State
·- -upreme Court Justice Paul J. Liacos share
ne thing in common - they both have objecfOns to television cameras iil the courtroom.
I. Justice Liacossays he fails to see how a "30~cond film clip on the evening TV news"
elps educate the public. He feels TV is "exloiting the plight of the defendaµt."
_
It is generally agreed that TV in living color
in hundr~ds of thousands of living rooms has a
pervasive impact~ Advertisers will pay $3,900
to Channel 5 for a 30-second commercial in
prime time to "educate" consumers.
Two superior court judges who have presided over noted "TV tr.ials" disagree with Judge
Liacos. They joined Justice Liacos discussing
the issue during "Law Week" at the Suffolk
University Law School recently. .
Judge. Andrew G. Meyer is <:urrent~y
presiding at the TV trial of Dr. Hussam who is
charged with the rape of one .Waltham
Hospital patient ar.!,d assault with interit to rape
another in 1978.
.
Says Judge Meyer: "The courtroom 1s
basical~y a public place...._You'd be _amazed
~ow qm~kly yo_ u forget a noiseles~,TV camera
ma back corner of the courtroom.
But Judge Meyer noted the .special "impact" of TV ~he~ at first h~. ex?luded TV for
the woman alleging Dr. Hussain raped her.
She claimed her right to confidentiality and
privacy with her psychiatrists. After a discussion with Channel 7's lawyers the next day,
Judge Meyers modifi~d his order, They would
not train the camera on the woman, but couldrecord .her testimony on cross-examination
while the camera was trained pn the jury or attorneys in the case.
Earlier, Judge Meyer had allowed cameras
to show the woman who alleges Dr. Hussain
sexually molested her. The TV cameras voluntarily did not photograph her ~ac~.
The names of the alleged victrms are freely
used in court, but almost all newspapers a!1d
the radio and TV media covering the trial
voluntarily do not use the names of the women.
Judge Roger J. Donahue presided, at the
Bradford Prendergast murder trial in
Dedham where the jury happenedto announce
its guilty verdict "live" on th'e 1a. p.m'. TV
news. Prendergast had been accused of kidnap
ing his former girlfriend and stabbing her· 25
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It was an "accident/' Judge Donahue said,

that the jury announced the verdict "live" on
TV. The prosecution . and defense attorneys
had ,stepped out to th~ Backside lounge for
some refreshroents.·The jury had to wait until
they got back. Judge Donahue said "everyone
_ was in good shape0 when they arrived back in
the courtroom,· which brought laughter from
theaudienceatSuffolkLawSchool..
All three judges agreed the presiding judge
' must exercise strict control of the courtroom
to prevent a highly .publicized trial from,
becoming a "media circus."
All three ju<Jges agreed there was a "circ'!IB
atmosphere" about the recent Claus Von
Bulow trial in Newport, R.I., where a
businessman was convjcted of attempting to
murder his socialite wi.f;e with inj~ctions of in1
sulin.

Dr., Hussain was also on TV a lot in his first
trial with two other doctors where they were
· convicted of raping a nurse in Rockport. Dr.
Hussain believes the . 30-second film clip
"distorts" the day-long testimony at a trial.
Inten,-iewed in the corridor during a recess
at his present trial, Dr~ Hussain said: "If they
televised the trial from A to z, that would t>e.
OK. I think tr~als should be public,- but they
(TV news) piece together excerpts· and they
give the trial a different navor.... It comes out
a totally different picture.'
Because of the media, Judge Donahue said,
ju,:ies must often be -sequestered away from
possible prejudicial news. ,At the Prendergast
trial, Judge Donahue said, he was distressed

q•:};··'-.;

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to hear a TV announcer talk - a~():i,it
"devastating" testimony, which gave a higffl.y
opinionate~ color to the news report.
. ;c'~:;~
To put a Jury away from the news media/JP a
motel for three weeks during the Prender;~~st
trial cost the taxpayers between $35,00Q and
$40,000. "I know. I had to sign the bills," JUgge
Donahue said.
_
.
Judge Liacos said TV "has n.ot
demonstrated its intent to educate the publili:!'
He said neither ne~spapers or TV. cov<'r 'tJ:ie
vast majority of ordinary trials.
_
_
.
, Liacos mentioned that while JudgeDonal!ue
didn't know it, the first wife of P,renderg~st
wrote and objected to the TV publicity wnich
was reaching int(,) New Hampshire and di$,turqing her children at school. He said he d_j(!n't :
want to be a "party to exploiting others;'' .;, / ,
_ Judge Donahue said a public 'l'.V-producer :
1
wanted to televise the Prendergast tr4al, but j
found it would cost him about $100,000 a weE:k(
which was too much.
[ · _ ·;7
The three- Boston TV stations which pooledff
their resources to put a TV crew in ' th~ .
Dedham courtroom every day for thre~ wee~
estimated it cost them between $350,000fn(l
$500,000,JudgeD~nahuesaidhe. wastold. ,:: :.
There is a rule m the J?edham c~urt thati-o ,
still photos can be taken m the corridor. Jud e
. Donahue said one TV reporter from Chanri · \5
-forced on~ still photographer to e~pose his':f_fJ.\vi_
after he vrnlated that rule.
_ , ·- -~T
While Judge Meyer paid tribute to the i'.t'jl:m'"
pact" of TV, he also noted: ''.You can sit lµ«e ~
blob looking at TV, but it takes a little/ 'intelligence to read a newspaper.'' _
£ ,
Among the reasons he _
favored TV inir the
courtroom, Judge Meyer said, was that:cq;iore
people in the community get rid of their g_~,r
''when/ they see justice being done in the
troom."
.. ·-., ·,.
TV.in the courtrpom is still officially ~('el-:
periment in Massachusetts" but Judge~r~eyer
is of the opinion it is so readily accep,ed ,the
controversy "may be academic as pe~ple get
used to it.''
·
,- , . ,
At the end of the Suffolk Confere ~e _
this
reporter told Judge Liacos the medi has .a
,r?le ~o play in keeping the c?urt13 hones .l?,,9ne
district court years ~go, a .~udge was .al¥~ a
you_ng defendant a. punk and shQW' ng bi_a.s
until a reporter with a ~otebook w __ e~ m.
\Yhen ~hat ha~pened, the Judge chang . his attitude in1mediately and asked the yo~g defendantifhewantedalawyer.

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USTON H£RAW AMERICAN
BOSTON, MA
J).

286,101

JUN 241982
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;_·TfiE:EVE
~'. ··-t

,Collins has Ed-start for-Ii

TAKING LICENSE: Belly up to
the bar, boys .. The odds are that exstate Rep. Jimmy Collins of South
Boston will nose out City Councilor
Dapper O'Neil and state aide Tommy
Menino (on Joe 'Timilty's staff) for
that low paying . ($21,000), but powerful job .as coinmish on the Boston
I,;icensing Board.
: ·
·
. After all, Guv King fills the. slot.
Collins. was with King from the start,
; later sel°Ved as legislative J.iais~n, is
·.... now J~luriking al9ng with Kfa-g in his
.. ~ re,.election big .. There .he was, big
. jife marching. ~long with-the--Ouv a,t
the Charlestown Bun}ce:r Hill parade:
Colli1.1~ d.edines to say ·what· his-chances are for the job held by Jon
Straight. His term. ran out June R
. ~'I'm a contender," said Collins. "I
haven't h.een able-to-get a f~el for it.~·
The odds on the other hand are surer that Collins and' wife Mary, parents of Micnaela, 1, will have twins in
· August. That's the doctor's diagnosis
_after tests.
"We didn't ask about: the sex,"
said Jimmy. "We'll wait i and see."
Same with the licensing bo~rd.

die Taylor ro:
For one thing, Ca.esat'insisted on a
ford.
chinning ba_r to chart his daily chin"Don't· bo1
. ups. The board, h~ ~id, had to be rebanks," cauti1
tractable so it could be mQved from
door to door.
·· former QWl'!er
and Paul's Ma
Then there was his diet. On a rigid··
banks. At i7
-- regimen of low cal; health cuisine,
won't have to
, Caesar issued a time and food list to
the ·chef in the haute cuisine Cafe
capital eye-de
Rouge. At 11 a.m~ (l>reakfast), he had
BACK: Hugh
to have pancakes. ,j\t 3 p,m. (lunch),
ABC-TV team
the Beth Isra,
lie had to have rieE},lsteamed zucchini
ment on an up,
and veggies. Din:n~r'.;was boiled cl\i.ck· was ,fres, glam
en; He also eschef¢d room service,
.· Hocked in at the.O;ife for his meals.
so glamorous I
orous.
·.
"It was simpleJood,'' concedecLone
hotel employe!:i .w~,bad to-intercede ,
Back Ache.
with ,Caesar and the chef..
Downs. .
"That was the, ,problem. They're
MORE.HlJ
not the l<ihd of drshes on the Cafe
Belushi may n
menu:" ·Eye would h<;ipe not! Rice and
yet.
boiled ~hicken! He :probably ate better
· But he cert
- when he was in the underworld.
Suffolk Unb
ReMy. Reedy~
·.
BANKY PANKY: A note for the
versity newspf
left b;mk. Irwin Ci>rey, the pitter patof · shots of· B
tering profess..or of nonsense, showed·.
from his "Pir:a1
· up a~ the surprise g\lest at the Freding room at th
r

as

HALE CA.~SAR: /Orpheus obviously had his problems in the underworld, chums.
But in Boston to act in the Offenbach opera, Sid Caesar ripped of a
reel of demands on men1,1s and venues.

1s Ed~statt for licensing job

CA~S.AR: 'Orpheus obproblems in the underns.
Boston to act in the Off,ra, Sid Caesar ripped of a
ands on mem1s and venues.

I his

F.or one thing, Ca.esaiinsisted on a
"You can~t do that," gibed Jim,
die Taylor -roast at the Hotel Bradford.
·
chinning ba_r to chart his daily chin~
pulling a Katharine Hepburn. "I'm
ups." The boar:d, h~ s~id, had to be re"Don't borrow money from the not a monument. You have to have my
tractable so it could be moved from
banks," cautioned Corey to Taylor, ·permissi<m."
·
door to door.
_ While Reedy gaped, Belu_shi made
former QWf!er of The Jazz Worshop
, Then there was his diet. On a rigid
. and Paul's Mall. "Lend money to the a seedy street gesture involving a finregimen of low cal~ h_ealth cuisine,
banks. At 17 -percent interest, we ger. Eye say! Katharine only yelled.
Caesar issued a ti~ and food list to
won't ]:iave to pay taxes anymore!" A But one must have standards!
the ·chef in the haute cuisine Cafe
capital eye-deal OH, MY ACHING
Rouge. At 11 a.m~ (breakfast), he had
BACK: Hugh Downs an~ his 20/20
A LITTLE TRAVELING MUSiC,
to have pancakes. ,ft 3 p,m. (lunch),
ABC-TV team schlepped into town to
he had to have rie~rsteamed zucchini
• the Beth Israel Hospital for a seg- PLEASE: Margaret Heckler, Republiand vegg1es. Dinri~t'.'was boiled chickment on an -upcoming show. The crew can congressperson, is bringing in two
' _en. He also esche:~~d .room service, _ · was tres. glam9'rous; ·The subject not Ronnie Reagan big guns nextmonth
· ·clo.cked in at the Qafe for his meals.
so g1ainorous ·but on a subject clam- in,her}ight against Democrat Cong.
'Barney Frank. He supposedly has set
"It was simplewod,'' conceded one
orous;
his sights ori a $1 million war chest.
hotel employee .WAio,•bad:to,intercede ,
Back Ache. So much for ups and
But Heckler-- should dQ okay with
with Caesar and the chef..
·
Downs. ·
Treasurey Secretary Donald Regan
"That was the,,problem. They're
MORE HIJINX FROM JIM: Jim formerly of Cambridge, who's bound
not the kihd of di-shes on the Cafe
Belushi triay not be a five-star star,· . t'o bring ;in all the bankers and big
m'enu:'' :E:y-e would h9pe not! Rice and
· _ ·
_
-business· types. Soon to follow will be.
yet.
_ boiled ~hicken! He probably ate better
But })e certainly played the role to Transportation Secretary Drew'
· when he was in the underworld.
Suffolk University junior Scott Lewis, a lure for all the honchOS" in the
·
Reedy. Reedy: who writes for the uni- movemept biz. Now that should suit
BANKY PANKY: A note for the
versity newspaper, snapped a couple Margaret to a T.
_.
left bank. Irwin Corey, the pitter patof shots of- Belushi as he_ emerged·'
Tomorro_w: Eye before E except
tering profes~r of nonsense, showed
_
- from his "Pi:r:-ates of :Perrzance"Jl:re~i;- .after see
up a~ thEl surprise guest at the Freding room at the Shubert. . -NORMA NATHAN

tlUSTON .PHOENIX
BOSTON, MA,
w. 113.000

JUL

61992

NewscHnl

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New
~ngland i

Entrepreneurial
t a1n1ng
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Business and 'the age :of·spedalizat~bn at.Babson .
_.
:
· :·'.
,-~·, ·, :,.,tr.
·-. ·
dividualism. He wants freedom,
and he wants control over his
own destiny. And at the same .
till\e he wants some other factors,
achievements that are related to
success."
If Babson students need a
model of individualism, they
need look no further than tl'le
sc_hool's founder. Roger Babson
made his fortune as a financial
analyst with. a theory .on ·the
business cycle said to)e ba~ed on
Newton's law of action and
. reaction. How this all work,ed
isn't clear, but it did well enough
for -Babson to warn his mvestors
away ·from the stock market
before the 1929 crash. And .,he
. was well enoygh established :by
1919 to start a school for those
who_ "by inheritance or 9.ther
circumstances_ ar~ · to step ,\m·
, mediately into;resp~msible places
without preliminary experieryce."'
. Babson's prestige was such that
· he charged $3000 for tuition at a·
.time :when Ivy Leagt1e tui_tipn
was $750-at most
..
Babson celebrated his roots by
planting a cutting from the Eng, lish apple tree that allegedly
bopped· Sir lsa·ac Newton and led
to the theory of gravity. The tree,
·. surround.ed by an iron fence, is a··
campus landmark - it's even
rumored that another cutting was
planted in a secret location dur- I
ing th~ days 9f campu~ ac,tivjsm,
w.he~it; was f~aredt~athd@~ans 1

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li~h ~pple tree v that allegedly
bopped Sir Isaac Newton and led
to the theory of gravity. The tree,
. surrounded by an iron fence, is a
campus landmark ·- it's even
rumored that another cutting was
planted in a secret Iocc1tion during th~ days 51f campu~.ac,tivism,
-when:it was feared thathog!_i~ans ,
would burn down ·tJ:te venerable i
tree.
ally Amos, aka Famous he and his ·wife started in 1971, strange way of saying "corpor- energy in-the development of.a
Thereareotheroddlegacieson
I I
Amos, was a high- recorded $100 million in sales.
ation" -,,- there' was a certain service or product leading to the the 450cacre campus where
IiI
school dropout when,;
Laura Brown, on the other contempt, a curl of the lip one ·rec:ognition of that service or Babson once roamed on horseI
m 1957, -he took his first step hand, is just starting out. The would expect from a good Marx- product as a contribution ·-of back and, according to legend,
towa·rd. fortune, Working as a senior at ~abson College owns a ist. Corporations, it seems,~ are value." The definition is brought dictated letters from the saddle ..
stock clerk at Saks Fifth Avenue campus enterprb,· · that sells considered .the haven of drones. home each year when the school Believing that a W<~rking knowlm New York, Amos studied advertising time b> projecting The folks collected in the con- holds a Founder's Day program edge of geography was essential
marketing at NYU and became a ads onto ·a· 1arge scrt:>en in the ference room had higher hopes. to honor "the importance of the to success'ful businessmen,
trainee at the William Morris Babson dining hall. Brown has They were studying to be ens entr,epreneurial spirit irt our free- Babson commissioned the
Agency.. _Soon he was handling plans to move to California after trepreneurs, a rare breed of risk enterprise system."
··
world's largest relief map of the
acts like the Temptations and the graduation and take her Focal takers who start their own busi··
For the past five Founqer's United States. At 65 by 45 feet, ·
Supremes. He signed . an unPoint Inc., to other schools.
nesses with the expectati()n of Days, the. school has fovited an this map fills an entire building.
kno,vn act with the improbable,
"What I'd be doing is contract- building them into legend am:! eclectic ,grou.p of entrepreneurs- ·outside is a World's Fair-size
name of Simon and Garfunkel. in_g with the schools to set up then moving on because it's made-good; ranging from Frank globe of the world.
After that .success, Amos moved different Focal Point boxes in gotten boring. To paraphrase Perdue· to Diane V o:n
. Bal,son also dotted his campus
to the W.est Coast and opened his different locations, hiring stu- some of the. conversation in the . Furstenberg, .to take part in a day with stone tablets bearing quotaown agency. He: became known dents to take my pictures and confere1'1ce room; it isn't the of pep talks and .pragmatic how~ tions from the Bible and Emer~
'to booking agents and studios for change the ads for me," she says promise of big bucks that entices,
sessions.
son. (He was a strong m·orafist
his habit of handing out choc-. in a rush ofwords. She builds her it's the urge to create, to meet the
Wally Arno's and Carl and in fact ran for president·in
Sontheimer were .among this . 1940, on the Prohibitionist ticket.)
olate-chip cookies ·made·from his scheme carefully. She'll get re- challenge.
"The money isn'tc- the end· year's guests. Their. sessions had He later started Weber College, a
Aunt Della's recipe. In 1975, at gional advertisers to buy time at
the suggestion of friends, ·he all her operations, "And then I'll result,"·says Brown. "1fs a way o~ arr almost revival-meeting quali- more modest institution for
opened his first cookie store on just backward integrate," she keeping score."
ty as the living success stories women, in Babson Park: Florida.
Much has been made about the exhorted students to go out and Babson s~w the need to educate
Sunset Boulevard. In the seven says, matter-of-factly;
frivolous rich women to prevent
years since, he has built, on Aunt
Brown was among a group of shift of values .,on· the campus. make good.
"l don't view anything as a them f.rom frittering away forDeHa's recipe, his personal Babson students who gathered in The idealism and·social concerns.
trademark of .a straw hat and a one of the ·school's conference of a decade ago . have slowly problem," said Amos, who wore tunes inherited from fathers or
Hawaiian .shirt, and the idea of rooms a few weeks ago to listen given way to a scholastic form of· a baseball cap apd sneakers to the husbands.
seHing brown paper 'bags of to Wally Amos and Carl survivalism. So.dial observers an- seminars. "Obstacles are
Babson College· has grown
cookies to the clientele of Sontheimer and to discuss the nounce that today's students a~e challenges to be met and over- from a school for the sons of
•Neiman-Marci.ls and Bloom- joys of capitalism.What the small most concerned _with studying for come."
-•
· .
industry into a 2700-student cam.ingdale.:s, Today, the Famous group had in common with big- the right job. There is a quiet
· Sontheimer told his audience pus where a major extracurricular
Amos· Chocolate Chip Cookie timers like Amos and Sontheimer desperation to choose a pro- never to give up. "There is no activity is running your own
Corporationbakes and sells six is their drive to create (in this fession early, .get tbe grades, and such• business that did not go business, where cost analysis is
tons · of cookies a week. The case, their own businesses) and to find a good-paying sanctuary through a crisis that would have done on fraternity parties, and
company grossed moce than $6 . be their own· bosses. At a, time after graduation. ·
killed it dead except that the CEO where management theory is
million last year. The hat and when their pe!i!rs on campuses
Babson is no different from Ichief executive officer) was either applied, to the salting team.
"This is a very small campus
shirt are now in the Smithsonian. around the country stare gloom- other schools in turning out such · too stupid. or too stubborn ,to
·
with a very narrow focus·as far as
Carl Sontheimer had founded ily at unemployment figures, corporate cannon fodder. But .for know it was dead."
three electronics firms and re- these Babson students brimmed the past 10 years, the school· has . Dr; Joh~ Hornaday, director of what you're learning," says
tired, aJlby his 53rd birthday: An with confidence; Each owned his been developigg, a program Jo -Babson's Center for Entrepre- Brown. "If you're 100 .percent
MIT graduate, Sontheimer or her own business; .all had big teach a small ,group of thrill neurial Studies, believes this gung ho into business, not a
patented 47' ·different gadgets plans for the future. There was an seekers the skills needed to con- . drive to succeed with your own liberal -artsy person, then you can
While working for RCA, includ~ air ofexpectation. .
ceive, give birth to, and raise a business is the individualist's survive here."
Students are:required to .take a
ing components for a radio , Certainly. they said, there are business. Babson, now offers .an reaction .to the conservative
microwave system that wen-t to drawbacks to attending a highly undergraduate majofin entrepre~ trends.· itt US society. A psy- clas_s load of 40°percent liberal'
the moon. But heJeftthe busine$S specialized school like Babson. neurial studies. There is a de- chologist, Hornaday thiuks en, arts. - But many:, of· the courses
I;.World. for his true love: cooking.. . For one. there. is this obsession . . mand. for the ·course. A survE!y trepreneurshrp offers the perfect relate ' to business. •A history
j Then, at a .housewares show, he
with rROFIT, a .word spoken .in · conducted by ,the school f<>und niche for the.independent person course titled "American lnstitusaw a commercial food processor. capital letters on· the Wellesley that a third of those who took these .days; to him, this r>piti,t of . tions" turns out to be a historical
,- "That .machine gave me -the ~ampus.Brownand,friendsthink ,entrepreneurlal. courses at_ independence-is exen)plifiedby reviewoftheUSi!conomy."Funhorrors,' 1 . he recalied later. "It . this obsession is largely confined. Babson between 1971 and -1975 the student who attends .his· ·damentals of.&ience" is describ- ·,
was totally unsafe." He spent 18 ' to.those who will graduate and .now own their own businesses;
business lectures on roller skates. ed by studei;tts:-1s ,dab course on
months perfecting a safe home find jobs with big corporation~..
Babson defmes entrepreneur'··~ere's a person who wants a scientific pri1;1tiple as applied to
food, pro,cessor. _ L~st_ . year , S,Om~ of ~he; ~pie a,semblaj ifl ·: s}'ip. as. "a, w_il_._l_i_1tgness t~ ta_k~ ... combination of . things," said business. All :this leaves. some
,Cuisinarts lri'c".,'.the 1=ompany~tfult · ·the"· 'conferen~e-' Joqmi~lia!.i· 'a'. risks ·and-~o invest moner -~nd Hornaday: . ''H~. 'wants in- · students wondering about life in·

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shop. The businesses, passed on
from graduating seniors to other
·van Breems
students, had a combined sales
~
.
concentration at
· volume of $175,000 last year.
.
. tends ;to .make students
0
.·' "It's a really highly charged
~
<?re,;narrow min?ed th.~n those ·...
atmosphere there," says Ben
g~nng _to othe~ ~chp?ls. To be a .
Bailey, a 1979 graduate ·who
~\
l~ader of any so.rt/you need a
· started and runs two computer
14> [
much broader perspective on all ..
firms. "The most impressive
<'I · .sorts o f.:t.h,mgs, 1·1.,.e art, " h e ·says. '
'
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thing to have on campus is a
I · ''Bufitts not exposed to us at all ..
successful busmess. I can say you
\ ' We l;laye to work to get out and
can get a lot more status compari
see 'art, whereas kids at other
mg your profits than getting
i
schools have art kids all around.
elected to the student governThey-can' interact • with these
ment."
rt
people and· see· what they're
Brine, whose Babson Tire Sales
;.J\
trying to do."
.
"keeps us m beer and pretzels," 1s
~
Brown, who is intensely inproud his business 1s ·a success.
Cl'J:
volved in a number of campus
What mystifies him 1s the
! activities, goes home to
outsider's notion that profit may
i ,Ck>uve~ter for escape. ·_·on weeknot be good. "I found that with
! .ends I have to get out of here and
my friends . . talkmg about
get normal again;" she says. "I go
making a profit was really.sort of
· ,\' .back to Gloucester and see norlooked down on and skirted
~al, people, and I get out of the g:
around," he says. "I think people
I
whole profit syndrome."
:S
are scared that they're gomg to
1
Bill Brine, another student who J
get.mto the old 'sc·ew-someone\
OW~S two businesses; f\nds it just ~
. else-or-get-screwed syndrome'
Jl'\~ opposite.· When he goes Jl&aiiiiiiiiiillliiiliilliliiiiiiiii.a.iiiiiili..;.~;.;;iiiiwG.W.liii..;;;,
and they don't want to get into
home, his friends consider him
this. We were everyone .wants to do well and that. I th1nk that that's unthat people
weird: "I'm the one who comes It failed: "We . could only lo~
talkil)g the oth day about busi- management need only help necessary but I thmk that's what
up-' with all these hare-brained $200," he says. ''We'll talk about.a
ness plans an how people get them along, i.e., the carrot.
they're scared of. They·~e scared

1
schemes on how to make money. party a11d stuff and we'll be
"We were discussing how to of screwing someone."
· !.:bounce .it off them andthey say talking about what percentage of . into.busine:,s d not even think
Some even-see profit as part of
~L:.pqk ,a:ttl)is kid:,He's strange.'" the Babson. market we nee~ to about :!t,· ·not en write things contro.1 the people fo -thf sailing
dowi;i,
,
team/' said Brine;' a co-captain.- a social responsibility, both to
,, :ilsririe a~d his3ellow students make the party profitable.''! had a
The total I ersion in busi- "We were in a group·;and this .customer and employee, "You
adtrtit to disassembling . every- .friend who was in charge .of
.ness affects : her aspects of person said; "X/Y" and every- get a better job, out' of them and
,
,t~Jtig 'from··beer ·commercials ·to· - programming over at Suffolk,·
1
, , ;fr,aternity parties to see where and he couldn't belie~e that. we campu$ Hfe. Brr e recalls the time body knew and we went right they .get more out of it if. the
tli¢y can find tlie profit.. Jeffrey could break even or make money the X/Y theo·· of management through the conversation. I sat company's run well," says Pete
1
came up at · meeting of the back after a while and said, Hemingway. co-owner of Babson
· :Mulligan, who runs a portable at parties."
·Tire. "Too many people in this
i:li!ico service, tells. the for.lorn
Brine can't believe anybody sailing team. ' er Theory X, he "Wow."
It isn't all theory at Babson. country don't en1oy their work, :
s'tbry of how his fraternity did a coµld be so foolish as to lose, . explained, ma:: gement opJrates
and it 1s the responsibility of
"break~even analysis" on a mbney, "I find it, welf not naive, under the pri pie that workers There are 23 student-owned bus-i
·pla'nned party to see whether i.t but.stupid," he says. "I find it's have to be tig y controlled, i.e., nesses on campus, from carpet management to help them. So I
C~J;i!'{AJJ,•'tige 11
could l.ose. $40~ m leftover funds. really'. well, shocking to think the- stick. The· Y assumes that sales to~- travel agency to a pizza
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/:~any people stress the fact that
there's management and there's
'labor.,There's a dichotomy there
that shouldn't be."
Profit may be the Holy Grail at
Babson, but for the student entrepreneurs, money is not the ·final
goal. Brine and his friends are
quick to point out that they are
primarily-in-it for a kind of Zen of
success. "The whole need for
-achievement, just accomplishing
something, means a lot to -me,''
says·Brown. "Not necessarily the
money imiolved or the power as
much as just being able to look at
something and be proud that I
did it"
With this need for self-expression, it is no wonder that
students like Brown and Brine
turn their noses up at the thought
of working for a large corpor: ation. "I don't particularly like
"big business 'a lot,'.' says Brown.
"A guy l know is a big corporate
leader," says Brine. "He says all
the fun is out of it for him. He
doesn't have time to even read
· i:nemos anymore. I wouldn't·
~ant t9 be a peon. J want h,mds
_ ' on. I want to. tall( to the supplier,
_ the, c1,1sfomer, the dealer. I want
,Ao realJy get down in there."
And what of the _prospect that
his business would take off and
gro\.V into an empire? _
_
- _At that point; I'd sell it and start
, another one,". ~ys Brine. "I just
wan~ Jo start them up and get
;,.,them going. As ~---as· it ·be·
),fomes.a bc>re, a routine, I want to
';, :get.nd'oflfand start over."·-, 0 .

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Hayn_esoody was nrs-c·ovena:r-slumpecf in the clriver's seat of her
' brown Volkswagen Dasher outsicle ·
.....;,...;;.........,._ _.. :a dowptown Coha~t gas station. -orough street, Boston, makes her way- along Commonwealth' avenue She had been shot five times in the
GLOB.E PHOTO BY MitHAEl QUAN
head.
:a statue of Samuel Eliot M;orison.

Brandeis: goals· and challenges
By Robert Levey
goals and expectations were so grand, yet there's a
Globe Staff
tendency to be ~lf"1ieprecating..:·
·
. After 30. years of teachir1g at Brandeis University;
And. a form et B.·randeis·_· a·.d·'mi.nistrator conf1·rms
.
Prof. Lawrence Fuchs does not hide his frustration as
he speaks of the school today.
.
tha1 although "Brandeis in many ways has rank with
"We have allowed ourselves to have too parochial a .. the Ivy League, internally they can't quit~ believe it. It
base,'i he said. "Out in the hinterlands they say, 'Oh;. seems to be_ the Jewish predilection for self-denigra·
Brandeis, that's that nice Jewish university in Massa- tion."
. As at most private uiliversities, money is central to
·
chusetts.' "
"Brandeis,, is alive, well and really an exciting place, the set o( challenges facing Brandeis. It must soon debut it doesr1't know it itself," said budget director Bur- velop new sources of financial support to supplement
ton Wolfman. "There is an attitude of self-denigration. what .has thus far been an almost exclusive flow of
It's the style around here. Everybody knocks the place. genei:ous Jewish philanthropy from donors in the Bos·
. The faculty knocks the trustees, the trustees knock ton and New York areas.
the administration. It's part of the sturm und drang
Th~ school will be guided through these important
that go.es on in ethnic communities. ·The perpetual transitional years by a new president, Evelyn 'Hanself-doubt. But that keeps us going. We create our own dler, who comes to tbe campus full-time in June from
internal tensions.'·
th~ presidency of the University of New Hampshire.
His view is wi ely shared. 'Even the current Brandeis president, Marver Bernstein, grants that "our BRANDEIS, Page 1I

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grO'ssly inadequate Shapiro gymna~1~~ictab1y, the newest growth slum, a facility built 30 years ago
area:for Brandeis students is the to serve a maximum student body
fi~fd; of computer science, which of 1000.
ha:_)' been;. expanded to accommoThere are six openings on the
d~e th~-rapidly growing-number of school's 50-member board of trustfr~~men and sophomores who ees, and there is strong movement
~a;nt ,tt as a major._
..
within the Brandeis community to
._ ~;Everyone wants to go into it," fill some of those seats with a more
saUi' faculty dean Carter, "but we diversified ·group that ~ould inwant to be. pushed too hard clude more non-Jews and certainly
bY;:::the market;'.'. Currently. 80 stu- some representatives of the high-.
dep~ a year are a.IIowed to enter tech industry.
·
·
tb~~ajor.
:!1,:ast year, Jhere was a flurry of · Con~idering its youth and size,
oti_!ra.ge on the' c,µipµs when a se-. 1 Brandeis has been able to accumuJeqttve guide to. colleges put togeth- late art impressive endowment of
er;Py -a New 'York Times reporter about $80 million~ which is about
q_tt~d on~ stu1~~ .•~~ ~yJng: "We the 50th ,largest among aU US uniar&t?verJ:;Un by ~erti,s'atthe present ' v~rsities. ~ut in recent years. the
tl~e.!')I/:1 1,a:µ · 9thepvise flattering attempt to mount a modern devel~~~~te,t!zayqn of.. the··ctltnpus, Opplen(progr~m-has beeri notably
t9~ g~11~rsu~te1:h stro~gly tli~t .· .unsuccessful. ·A half-dozen vicefie!<;e,academ.1~5for!Jp'etfti.ori ail_d' presidents have gone through the
COmptllSiVe !a!hinV :h!'>hitc, ·~!°"'':'.!"' '.:'_' l"Ptrnl'7inrt rlrinr fr, tJ...;_ ,l~..~1-----+

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:~ Brandeis n
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jean -Davidtre 'of Handler a
frustrate~nt, plans are
down the ha very big fund·
ewishsch0<
d by high. officials hope ti
'.lors in mos from now, pos1
with the officis
,wing view 01andler, the sch
~ r n ' l major capita
_ M:3.SOM -:psk force of Br
, jjust been appoi
OC\ u,aq l~~-fo.~ that, campal
B.lSB;) lOUI~.
We need a
urn~ pan in the $100-n
u-eql ssa{ ~r to pos~~ion ou
Ql Sl:>W, .c.entury.
. ·
1} future of the c
o:> :>nspatle Squire says i:
s lnq uai ~ents over the ye
wamq au; ,1at "nonJews st
·
· ce and Jews se
10~ a.1ow ~

,j

/ It:~f:t~~I
maintebai

I

d.·w·IHHS '

'!UIIVIII 11:"llU U~'!'JUJ

s and many
ndeis now are ,
frankly about ~
~ce has not bee
• Fuchs said. "01
)tting out. Fifty
iow, a large majo
•opulation at Br;
· wish. And that'
arttime, Brandei
Jntriguing strug
ewish origins a1

·anvhat n"rs,.

ways to broacl,c
al to the larger
de.

/

...,-,c.---·-:-·~-~--·-.~~-~v---~......----- --.--------- ---~-~~---~ -- -.,..-----~,-. - - - - ·
f

/



8,!~hdeis University:, goats: and ehfillenges

1

'l

been a pqwerful magnet for fund"
• l3RArffiEIS
·. ing of irnporfant rei;;~n::h,on socia.l
Continued from Page 1
The elusive nature of the interpolicies and Jt lias produced a farnal debate she will confront on the
flung cadre of leaders. in .huma:.n
J3pp1deis campus is summed up by
services.
·
~i~c.f.eis trustee DavidSquire, who
B~rnstein:, who is retiring in
sve_n.t the '70s on the campus as
june after 11 years as 'president. •
has been able to keep the operating
university vice president: "This
place poses all the problems of the
budget in :balance for the past sevTalmud," said Squire. "Every an"
en years. but onlyhy methods that
swer 1;1as a question."
have taken a toll. the universfty's
clerical,, sec.retarial and .ctistodia]
' ·oespite the current financial
pressures, Brandeis has been able
staffs have been shrunk to the
to maintain its extremely highbone. "You need a requist~on slip to
powered academic environment
get a paper clip," said a cranky fatwhile it continues to wrestle with
ulty member,..
.
these other less tangible issues that 1: . The athletic plant is a rtlf$S;
. touch upon. the institution·s Jew·Plans t<;>. ri::pair and e~pand it ,at a.
ish ~dentity. its yo,uth and its lofty
cost of iip fo $8 milli()n .h~ve'been
.:. · ambitions.
·
left dangling. to the chagrin of siu~
;
The econo.mic w<;>es of the '70s
dents involved in the very active in"
;, have .alteady feirced 'Brandeis to
framuraf and, varsity sports pro- ·
; tighte'Jiits fiscal belt. Though the
gram.
.
.
·
··
The school is also dragging
': schooh.s only 34 years old, the·:ss.
; building campus on a hill in Walalong an accumulated deficit of $10 ·
li- tham is already in a state of mod- Silhouett~ of a sf'llt;ue of Louis Brandei~ c;in the.Brandeis campus.
million that is draining. a million
~. est neglect that will require an esti'
·
·
dollars a year out of operating
/ ,.. mated $20 million in deferred quipped about.,th. e. s.h.· ort:a. ge. of
Tod.·ay· the· a'c'ademic pro/gr·
. funds to pay interest.
· ·
,v:
i t '
d
. ·· · ·
· · ·
·am is
'Bern.stein recently alerted the·,
·,~. ma I?, enanc~ spen ing over. the ma.inten.ance fu. nds.: .... "N.o'body domina't.ed more by· ·the sc·1·ences
·
·
'
td d
·· · ., · " · · · · · · ·
· · trustees and. all. universi.ty. d,epart,
~; nex ec~ e.
.
I
wants to endow a se)Ver;·· .· ". ··. Ther~ are worJd~class'faculty mem" ments that the current general op~:.
In its early years, under the dazThrough the I 950s, Sachar had bers like physicist Stephen Berko era ting ·.budget of $48.:4 million ,
~- zling sa!esmanship of its founding placed tqe school on the academic and biochemist William Jencks must be cut back by $1 intlliori' in
'; presid~nt, Dr. Abram Sachar, map by attracting "stars" to the. afld an intense galaxy of graduate HJ83-84 or salary increases wiH} be•
w Brandeis rushed to build its phys- faculty like Leonard Be·rnstein, · programs in .both the physical and
threatened;
· ·
;; ical plant. But Sachar never could who founded the music department medical sciences. .
At a Dec. 9 meeting of the trust~ attractthe extra er:!_dowment funds fu 1951; radical social scientist
Brandeis is also hqme to the ees in .New York C(ty, concemed.
'" to take care of the buildings: It was . Herbert. Ma.reuse; .wh<f came in unique Heller Schoot, a graduate ' "trustees·were-~o wametL-aoottt Ji : C: hard enough to get the donations to 191;4 and stayed 12 years: brilliant P!ogram in 1.t1ana~~ment_in the so- lingering $500,000 shortf~ll in.this ..
t~ cover constructioµ.·sachar, who, is writer/editor/critic Philip Rahv;, c1akwelfare field. It begms when~ year's budget, ~nd severa• of them'
. :::. still on campus in his honorary ca- and political scientist and colum- schools of social work leave off,". immediately ple'dged more than.
;~ pa~Jty as chancellor-emeritus, n.ist Max ~rner.
Sachar likes to say. The school has- Continued on next page..
te~tuJ1 qr a necessary -result .of lUKr~CIT"lc-Cirni::-ttrTinr."-;.n>ri'Jrnr--,ri-......-'...;.----_..;.-.;:_--:--~-----:----~---"t"-~......- -..........,,...........;..;.;...........;.;....;.;;.~
Ir~Jigin,today's economy." ·
grossly inadequate Shapiro gymna. ~~~rajictab1y, the newest growth slum, a facility built 30 years ago
area:·ror Brandeis students is the to serve a maximum student body
fififd, of computer science, which of 1000.
h~' been/expanded to. accommoThere are six openings on the
~~ the-rapidly growing-number of school's 50-member board of trustfreshmen and sophomores who ees,and there is strong movement
w:ah'liit as a major.
within the Brandeis community to
~:Everyone wants to go into it," fill some of those seats with a more
sanJ' faculty dean Carter. "but we diversified' group that -would indon't ·want to be. pushed too hard elude more non-Jews and certainly
b;y;the market." Currently, 80 stu- some representatives of the high-.
d~ijt,s a year are a,llowed to enter tech industry.
·
tbii~ajor.
.
. ~styear, U1ere was a flµrry of · Considering its youth and size,
ou!t"age on the carnp1,1s when a se-.. 1 Brandeis has been able to accumul~ttve guide to. colleges put togeth- late an . impressive endowment of
ei;-~ -a' New York T,imes reporter abouL$80 million~ which is about
q111~ed (IO~ stude.rit, A~ sayJng: ''.We .t_he 50th ,largest among au us uniare,~~er~un by p.erd,s'atthe present _v,ersities. ~ut in recent years, the
tirf!e.::)Iffiaf:1.' ~thepvise flatterin~ attempt to mount a modern develc~i;S;Cte,r!zat~qn of. the campus; . opP1ent, program has been notably
t~I Si:t:1~r:.stt~steg: strongly· th~t · ,unsuc~essful.A half~dozeri vicef~!'{ei:a,'cadepii~"competitfon and pr~idents have go11e through.the ·1
CO~f~siye study.habits pre.ate a· revolvin~·cloor,,lp. t~e,development I
0

/~--,

-..

~-='~:·; t
:.;.

·t:·

lff~~deis: Is it attractive enough to non~Jews?
Contlnued'~r;orn preceding page
I

coming temure 'of Handler as Bran·
deis president. plans are quickly
forming for a very big fund-raising
push.
Brandeis officials hope that less
than a year from now, possibly in
conjunction with the official inauguration of Handler, the school wifl
announce a major capital fund
drive. A task force of Brandeis
trustees has just been appointed to
begin plans for that, campaign. ~
kulow says: "We need a capital
campaign in the $100-million
range in order to position ourselves
. for the 21st century."
As for the future of the cultural
issue, trust~ Squire says in talking with students over the years he
has found that "nonJews see it as
.a Jewish place and Jews see it as
EVELYN HANDLER
too Jewish."
Takes over in June
He, Fuchs and many other
office. Though the• school ·still friends of Brandeis now are willing
raises more than $15 million a year to talk more frankly about what is
from donors, Bernstein said that needed.
,
"private· giving has flattened out
"This place has not been preduring the past four years."
sented well." Fuchs said. "Our sto. And the only time that a.major ry is not getting out. Fifty or 75
capital fund drive was undertakeri, years from now, a large majority of
the timing could. not have been the student population at Brandeis
worse. It was just before the Arab- will not be Jewish. And that's as it
' Israeli war of 1973, and the drive should be."
·
was immediately scuttled so it
In the meantime, Brandeis will
wouldn't compete with the enier- continue its intriguing struggle to ,
gency call for funds that went out respect its Jewish origins and refrom Israel to Anierfcan Jews; . ·" .. i·matn excellent·as·whatrn's, while
But with the hiring a year ago of exploring new ways to broa~en the
Erwin (Irv) Sekulow as vtce-presi- school's ap~al to the larger comdent for development, and the up-. munity outside.

o(H,POO Brandeis alumni are
medical doctors.
·?riie: '.'preprofessional" attitude
ott f~mpus is so pervasive that it
has -become a constant cause of
001,1:~f:n among some students, faculty.a.ni'ladministrators. As admissiQr,lS, dean David Gould put it: "I'd
Ii~~, tp see more smiles on student
faces.:,'.· Senior Marlene Besterman
noted,'.that "it's easier to get into
Br~nd~is than to do well here."
Li~~, . .most Brandeis students, she
pr:a!~ the school's academic rigors _and said that unlike other top
sc.b.QQ}~.•Brandeis is a place where ·
prolflipent senior faculty and their
stud~~ts meet in small groups and
get to;kriowdne another;Jn fact. it
Is ,,iQfuniisual for undergraduates _DAVID SQ,UIRE.
atBr~ndeis to_parttctpate as assis-· 'All the problems of the.Talmud'
taQ;~~/Jn faculty-research projects
· ·.
and share in ·the c edit h
,somewhat antisocial atmosphere.
suJts,.·are publisfiecf in :'c:he~ ~e- · Senior Mi~hael Swartz said the
0
jour~s.
· ·
·
ar Y bad social notice in the guide pro·Bubnuch of the pressure t
. - duced a positive result, stirring
fo~m..-1~ more clearly linked t; ~;~- some introspection among student,.fears about future employ- dents and stimulating a small
meI.lbJ;h to th j
f ·
surge of new on-campus activities
seireh,, ~.tor KrTs:~~li>einu~r~fe lntcludlng some spirited sµpport of
tw::the .current issue of an alumni a hletic teams.
.
.
ptlbitcation. the Brarideis Review:
Thou_gh it gave up intercolle"l;j-arid~is students today seem less giate football many years ago,
col}cefned with 'why' the
·
1 ht Brandeis today boasts outstanding
~n 'money, than they ~r: swit~ v~rsity team~ in cross-country run·n~w.', ... Students often seenness-:mng,c SQCCe~...J:~a$etball, baseball
ccia:cerned with changing society and wo~en s fencing.
t~n th~y are with succeeding in
It also has a vital intramural
it.~j i .'Depending on whom you ask, ~ports program, highlighted by 45
alf~his preprofessionalism ts either camp~s basketball teams that play
practical. or ·materialistic, antHn- in ·Vaf'iot:IS. -c-leagues and ··somehow'
te!µ;ctual qr a necessary result of find court time in the shabby and
liW,~gtn, today's economy."
grCJssly inadequate Shapiro gymna~replctab1y. the newest growth slum, a facility built 30 years ago
area· for Brandeis students is the to serve a maximum student body
f~fd; of computer science, which of 1000.
h~. been;expanded to accommoThere are six openings on the
d~e the·rapidly growing-number of school's 50-member board of trustfreshmen and sophomores who ees, and there is strong movement
wiht1it as a major.
within the Brandeis community to
~·;Everyone wants to go into it," fill some of those seats with a more
satµ' faculty dean Carter, "but we diversified group that . would indon't want to be. pushed too hard clude more non-Jews and certainly
by~the market.'.'. Currently. 80 stu- some representatives of the high-.
d(ijt;s a year are allowed to enter tech industry.
·
tbii~ajor .
Considering its youth and size,
. ~;ast. year, t'?ere was a flurry of
ou!rage on _the c.alllpµs when a se-. I Brandeis has been able to accumul~iye guide to colleges put togeth- late an impressive endowment of
ei:;py a New York Times reporter about·$80 million, which is about
ct~~ea one .student~~- sayJng: '.'We the 50th largey;t among all US unia~e,~~;'~r~n byp.erd,satlh.epresent v,ersities. ~ut in recent years, the
tliie;-: )In 1ap · 9therwise flattering attempt to mount a modern develc~i;~et~r,.!zat~9n of .the c~mpus; opment progr~m has beeri notably
t\}~ ~Jaf:;sU,gg~stecl•stre>1,lgly th~t .·unsuccessful.·/\ half~dozeri vicefi~11~e;:acade,mic,co1_,1peti,{ion and' P_reside.n.ts_ have.g9ne thr9ugh t_he ·1
co{!iP,~lsiye sh.1dY.. Jiablts c.reate a revolvipg.door 1Inthe development·.
.·.;.:
. ..
,.
"..
• . .
. .
:--·,:c. .
... ··.. :.
·: . ,

U\hllVI•

••11•--••-

BOSION, MA.
IL 40.000

912

f{eW

~s,&ld

!l{ Neiflt:liP.

\l

_,;S,.L_{,!/{ ?:

,&

Memorable Moment!~~
T

ment at the Democratic convention when Walter Cronkite,
reporting somberly on the "terrible setback" for the McGovern forces in their losing challenge to the South Carolina
delegation, cut to CBS cameras
at McGovern headquarters,
where a riotous celebration was
in full swing.
It was that kind of year in
American politics: frenetic, erratic, felonious, unfathomable.
Return with us now to the days
of yesteryear, and savor these
nuggets served up from the
mineshaft of America's
deep, dark political hole.

Next on the L
Were Sleepy,
and Doc
Sargent Shrive
tennis at the K
pound in Hyar
got the heady 1
McGovern's ei
choice for vice
ready retired tc
were Eagleton
nedy, Humphri
son, Askew, an
whom declined
"I'm very happ
happy. And m)
I'm very happy
proud."

ior, a 69-year-old widow from
Winchester, an.cl a 25-year-old
Communist party elector,
O'Neill said, "They look like the
cast from Hair." Lamented
White: "I'm glad I didn't take
my bathing suit out of
mothballs."

HE HISTORY BOOKS GROAN

with them. Ed Muskie's
bawling in a New Hampshire snowstorm as his commanding lead slipped away. Hubert Humphrey's splenetic
attacks on McGovern in California, the last peevish gasps of
a perennial also-ran. The Whiz
Kids and the Youth for Nixon,
the plumbers and the bummers,
the Eagleton fiasco and the Salinger-to-Hanoi debacle, the
posters ("Four More Years!"
"Nixon Has a Secret Plan for
Ending the War: He's Voting
for McGovern"), the roasters
(McGovern to a heckler during
the last days of the campaign:
"I've got a secret for you: kiss
my ass"), and the magic mo-

You Don't Have to Be Nice,
Ed, Just Be Gentle
Turning to his campaign staff
after one of his speeches was
picketed by a group of gay-liberationists, Ed Muskie growled,
"Goddamn it, if I've got to be
nice to a bunch of sodomites to
be elected president, fuck it."
If It's Billy Graham, We're
Moving to Grand Rapids and
Praying
Asked by a clergyman in Grand
Rapids, Michigan, if he would
ever consider naming a theologian Secretary of the Interior,
George McGovern answered
that he'd "consider naming a
theologian Secretary of Defense" instead.

News Reaches You Slowly
When You're Hooked on "The
Muppet Show"
Former governor of Massachusetts Endicott (Chub) Peabody,
campaigning hard for the second spot on the Democratic
ticket during the New Hampshire primary, reversed his longheld stance in favor of the war
in Vietnam by proclaiming, "It
is apparent that the cold war in
China is over. There is therefore
not one good reason to continue
the hot war in Vietnam with the
puppets of China."
Bay State Social Notes; or,
Mothballs over Miami
Conspicuously absent from the
official Massachusetts delegation to the Democratic convention were such political
heavyweights as Tip O'Neill,
Kevin White, Attorney General
Robert Quinn, State Treasurer
Robert Crane, Senate President
Kevin Harrington, and House
Speaker David Bartley. The reason? They'd all run on the
doomed Muskie slate. Commenting on the actual delegate
lineup, which included a 20year-old Suffolk University sen-

Hello, Ronnie? This is Dick.
Dick Nixon. Listen, I-Hello?
Ronnie? It's Dick. Dick Nixon.
Listen, I-Hello?
California Governor Ronald
Reagan, delivering the keynote
address at the Republican convention, ridiculed the Democ.ats for selecting McGovern
while all but ignoring the memory of Lyndon Johnson. "Millions of patriotic Democrats
were disenfranchised in the
takeover of their convention,"
huffed Reagan. "A former
president of the United States
became a nonperson. His years
in the service of the party and
the nation were unmentioned."
True, but the Patriots May
I iave Changed All That
Finally, McGovern himself, surveying the wreci<age of ail he
had hoped for arid dreamed of,
offered this campaign postmortem: "There really are a great
1iumber of people in this countiy that are a hell of a lot more
Hcrested in whether the Dolphins beat the Redskins than
they are in whether Nixon or
McGovern ends up in the White
House."

Stop Splashing, Fanne, You're
Creating a Social Whirl
The self-styled "candidate without charisma," former Congressman Wilbur Miils tested
the presidential waters early in
'72, until public indifference
sent him packing. "As one who
avoids the Washington social
whirl, preferring to spend his
hours at work or at home," said
one campaign pamphlet, "Mills
has nevertheless gained an esteem in Washington creditable
lo few in American history."
Months later, a besotted Mills
was fished out of the capitol's
Tidal Basin in the company of
stripper Fanne Fox.

t

!

Oh, Buzz Off Yourself, You
Convicted Potato Louse
Calling McGovern "a confused
bee," Spiro Agnew also said
that the Democratic candidate
was "doomed to buzz off into
the footnotes of history, never
having pollenated a single
issue."

I'

Pull Down You
Won't Feel a Th
A week after Sh,
Eagleton on the t
the new Democr
cover. The issue
newsstands ever
week, on the oth
cover story on Cl
puncture and hai
highest newsstan
year history.
Fly the Friendly .
Traveling on the .
press planes duri
paign was more ~
than a week in th
Zone. According
Crouse's The Boy
one stewardess b,
ing had sex with
Secret Service ag,
three cases of ven
were reported; an
borne female corr
sued a married m
for "illegal acts cc
the state of Iowa '

)'

~\i

YORT'{'
~

nenh~f Campaign '72
~

Next on the List, after Happy,
Were Sleepy, Dopey, Grumpy,
and Doc
Sargent Shriver was playing
tennis at the Kennedy compound in Hyannisport when he
got the heady news that he was
McGovern's eighth and final
choice for vice-president. Already retired to the sidelines
were Eagleton (dumped), Kennedy, Humphrey, Ribicoff, Nelson, Askew, and Muskie (all of
whom declined). Said Shriver,
"I'm very happy. My wife is
happy. And my kids are happy.
I'm very happy and very
proud."

op Splashing, Fanne, You're
reating a Social Whirl
:ie self-styled "candidate with1t charisma," former Con·essman Wilbur Mills tested
1e presidential waters early in
2, until public indifference
:nt him packing. "As one who
t0ids the Washington social
'hirl, preferring to spend his
::mrs at work or at home," said
1e campaign pamphlet, "Mills
3s nevertheless gained an esem in Washington creditable
, few in American history."
lonths later, a besotted Mills
'as fished out of the capitol's
idal Basin in the company of
ripper Fanne Fox.

)h, Buzz Off Yourself, You
:Onvicted Potato Louse
:ailing McGovern "a confused
,ee," Spiro Agnew also said
11at the Democratic candidate
,as "doomed to buzz off into
11e footnotes of history, never
1aving pollenated a single
ssue."

l

And He Would Certainly Be
the First to Know
In a rare Boston campaign appearance, Vice-President Spiro
Agnew, accompanied by First
Lady Pat Nixon, spoke at a Republican dinner at the Commonwealth Armory in October.
Police had to use horses and
dogs to turn back the thousands
of demonstrators who showed
up to heckle Agnew. Sniffed
Spiro, "I didn't know the San
Diego Zoo granted paroles."

Other Than That, How Did
You Like Him?
In a September editorial entitled
"The Next Four Years," the
New York Times, America's
most influential newspaper,
said, "President Nixon has
shown himself willing to exacerbate racial divisions for purely
political purposes; he has countenanced and encouraged an
ominous erosion of individual
rights and First Amendment
freedoms, and has demonstrated his indifference to such dangers by deliberately selecting
Spiro T. Agnew as potential
successor to the presidency.
Protected by the White House
curtain, he has stood above the
political battle as the odor of
corruption and of sleazy campaign practices rises above the
Washington battlefield."

Didn't He Also Write The
Howard Hughes I Know and
Love?
A week before the election, Arthur Tobier published a quickie
paperback entitled How Mc-

Govern Won the Presidency,
and Why the Polls Were
Wrong. One of Tobier's theses

Pull Down Your Pants, You
Won't Feel a Thing
A week after Shriver replaced
Eagleton on the ticket, Time put
the new Democratic team on its
cover. The issue bombed on
newsstands everywhere. Newsweek, on the other hand, ran a
cover story on Chinese acupuncture and had the fourthhighest newsstand sale in its 40year history.
Fly the Friendly Skies
Traveling on the McGovern
press planes during the campaign was more action-packed
than a week in the Combat
Zone. According to Timothy
Crouse's The Boys on the Bus,
one stewardess boasted of having had sex with 18 different
Secret Service agents; at least
three cases of venereal disease
were reported; and one airborne female correspondent
sued a married male colleague
for "illegal acts committed over
the state of Iowa "

explaining the unexpected McGovern victory was the scoop
that preelection polls failed to
survey the 11 percent of the voting population who had no
telephones but who "tend to be
Democrats."

I Small Hints from the Almighty
That the Polls Do Not Lie

I During the last week of the
i

campaign, McGovern had an

I outdoor speech in Syracuse
. completely drowned out by
pealing church bells, saw a ChiI cago motorcade canceled because of a train wreck that
killed 44 pcopk, lost another
rally opportunity in Minnesota
when a freak blizzard snowed
him out. and finally went on live
television in Michigan, where.
after five agonizing minutes of
, waiting for McGovern support[ ers to call in with their quL:s! tions. the show's producers disshire, where Nixon beat McGovern by a vote of 16 to 3. The ) covered that the phone wasn't
/ plugged in
McGovern campaign never
recovered.
I
i
1

Dix Notch for Nix, Natch
The first town in America to file
its November vote tallies was
Dixville Notch, New Hamp-

I

L_~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-~~~--J

THE EN1£.RPR\SE
BROCKTON, MA
'i), 00,5CO

OCl 26 \982
l

- 6.0o,38g

Nevi
Engl~
Newedip

,--.

Nuclear war ---is discussed
in schools
·

BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE
BOSTON, MA

BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE
BOSTON, MA

CAMBRIDGE (AP) - Stu-•
dents at scores of schools in
the state are having a, taste
of something other than the
'
three R's.
At schools in Cambridge,
Brookline, Watertown and
others, students turned their
attention to nuclear war on
Monday, watching films de,.
picting its horror and then
discussing ways to prevent
it.
Many Boston schools, including Boston Latin, were
expec::ted to do so today or
next week.
Th~ forums marRed what
was calied a National Day of
Dfalogue;
sponsored
by
Educators for Social ResponsiblitY;_ a nonprofit organiza- 'i
tion based in Cambridge.
\\

~:t1r£~I

part in ~assachusetts.
~
The students showed a !\\
mixture of despair and hope :\
when faced with the possibil- •··
ity of atomic holocaust.
:
"If there's going to be a
nucle,,ar war there's nothing
we can do to stop it," said
one student at Cambridge
Ringe and Latin ·School.
"What are we going to do,
ask Russia 'Please don't do
it?'"
I
"There's two ways the
arms race can end,'' said
. another, Zachary' Andrien.
"It can end by stopping it or
it can end with everybody

dead."
Organizers of the events
said making students aware
of nuclear issues is vital a
-r
vital part of education.
"As teachers, we prepare (
students for t))e future, n said ~
Abigail Erdmann, an .English. ,teacher at Brookline
High · School. ' "Education s
that does ·not acknowledge d
the possibility · of nuclear
holocaust leaves students in
the dark.';
:At_
Watertown
High
School, Professor Vahe Sara- ,
fiaµ,, ,::t Soviet s~ialist at
Suffolk University, argued
~ e on nuclear
weapons..
.
'
···One ~tudent responded

AUG

81982

OCT. 24, 1982

New
Enghmd
Newsclip

-LEARNI.NG NOTES

/

- ;: Suff~lkUniversity ancl the Ocean;
R~sea:rch ancl:Ed,ication Society have
e$tablished a new oceanography program
beginning in November.

Suffolk receives

slave histories
for blac~ studies
.
,.:r~~
.

.

The seagoing field experience will include research aboard the r/v Regina
Maris, a 114-foot barkentine, one of the
tall ships that came to Boston in 1980.

'

.S~k University has i , : ~ ~
on loan $2100 worth of books. ari!t
microfilm dea}ing with blac~
American history for the Collectiod
of. Afro-American Literaturdhou~d. at the university's Mildrel
F. Sawyer Library.
·
·
l

The tropical marine science program,
according to Dr. Arthur J. West, chairman of the biology department at Suffolk,
is bpen to undergraduate and graduate
students, 18 or over, in the Boston area.
• The course, featuring a biology seminar
and introduction in marine;tudies,
consist of seven three-hour meetings at
Suffolk on Nov. 6, 13, 20, Dec. 4, 11. Jani
8 and 22. There will also be a 10-day research cruise in and'-ar~nd P~rto Rico
and the Virgin Islands· fron/,Dec, 27 te



a

.

will

,The material includes 41-vo~
ume work entitled The America'
Slave: -A· Composite ·Aut6btogra
phy with George P. Rawlick, gener

al editor. The books are compo:J
of oral histories of ex~slav~ ~md
veal personal stories and reminisJ
cences of life under slavery. Seve]
!e·.en. reels of of blackIm .exh.i.bit t.h.
mtegral role m. icrofi. Americans i
the anti-slavery crusade document
ed in correspondence, speeches, es1
says, pamphlets and refor:qi jour{
nal.-~·· The collection is a j.o.Int proj
ject of Suffolk Un~versity. ahd th
1
Museu.111 of Afro-Amer~can Hi~~~ry.

-;J

Jan. 4.

··

'.

, Stud~nts will choose research tc:ip·~~i .
for_ their field experience, prepare
search reports and take part in seminars.
The courses are part of the five-credit.
tropical marine science program.
,: · ·
. For more information, contact Dr. Arthur J. West at the Suffolk University;biology department, Boston MA, 02114,,p~
call 723-4700, ext. 347. Deadline for ap-i
plying is Oct. 20.
,, ;

re~

1

-·-.. ;

BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE
BOSTOH, MA
f{e~

AUG. 29, 1982
r-,=

New compllt@:r.studies
at Suffolk university

$~
~e-wadi-P

. ·' ~ ~:±~~- -~~~(-Nl~G ~ liOiU

Suffolk j.Jni:yersjty will offer two post-bacca'
~~l
laureate certificate programs in computer sciSu!ftk UnJvetfity taw School
ence applications this fall. The Physical and has esta8ished.a Center for ProfesComputer Science Applica,tiohs Center (PCSAP} sional Development for practicing
integrates computer science applications with attorneys featuring one-day collothe disciplines of chemistry, mathematics and quia on recent legal developments
(physics, while the Life Studies and Computer and multi-day institutes.
,
Science Applications Certificate Program
Suffolk Law Professor Charles
(LSCACP) blends a general background in biolindregan, who is chairing the
ogy with computer science applications.
center, said that the faculty ofthe
Both programs aqdress the need of liberal law school is committed to expandarts graduates for the_techn~c::al. expertise re- ing opportunities for members of
quired to enter the computer ~cience and data the bar in the field of continuing leprocessing fields.
_
_
gal education.
F.or more information, contact Barbara
D
Gralfa, director of PCSACP,",at 723.:-4700,
ext.138, or Dr. Beatrice Snow, director of.,.LSCACP at 723-4700, ext; .245.

·,.~": .-~&/;·'.-"tii.i>~~~ T~~

~,: ~.:·:.:, ~·~- ... ~:~~-~-~~:~_.·~~~:;__ : . _ : , - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ :

--~~~=----=-- ..._,. -

~uttolk receives

is cus·cussed
in schools

--4911'

~ Suffolk UJ!lV~rslty and · tlie Ocea:
·~~ch. aild,'Ed-pcatlon Society ha;v
e$tablished a new oceanography prograr
beginning in November.

slave histories
for blac~ studies
.~

The seagoing field experience wHI in
.
CAMBRIDGE <AP) -- Stuelude research aboard the r/v Regim
dents at scores of schools in
Maris, a 114-foot barkentine, one of tht
the state are having a· taste
ta]) ships that came to Boston in 1980.
S~k University has ~~.
··
of something other than the
on loan $2100 worth of books an·
The tropical marine science program,
three R's. ·
·
microfilm dealing with blac
ac.cording to Dr. Arthur J. West, chair·
At schools in Cambridge,
American history for the CoUecUod
Brookline,: ·Watertown and
man of the biology department at Suffolk,
of Afro Americah Literaturd
others, sttidents turned their
is• t:,pen to undergraduate and graduate
ho~ at the university's Mildr~
attention fu. nuclear war on
students, 18 or over, in the Boston area.
F. Sawyer Library;
· · ·.
-1
Monday, watching films de• Tqe course, featuring a biology. seminar
.
picting its horror and then
and introduction in marine ;tudies, .will
,The ma.teria.I .i.ncludes a.· 41-votl
discussing ways to prevent
con~ist of seven three-hour meetip.gs at
ume work entitled The Ainericarf
it.
Suffolk on Nqv. 6, 13, 20, Dec. 4, I 1, Jmi!
Slave: -A· Composite · Autobiog~a
Many Boston schools, in8 and 22. There will also be a IO-day rephy with George P. Raw.lick, gener
cluding Boston Latin, were
search cruise in and"'ar~nd P~rto Rico
al editor. The books are compo
expected to do so today or
and the Virgin Islands frow.Dec. 27 t@
of oral histories of ex~slaves and r
next week.
Jan. 4.
,
veal personal stories' and reminisJ
The forums marlced what
. Students wili choose research tcipi~i ·
cences of life under slavery. Seve~,
wa:s c~lied a National Day of
for, their field experience, prepare
Dialogue,
sponsored by
teen reels of microfilm exhibit th~
search reports and take part in seminars.
Educators for Social Respon, integr.al ro.le of bla.ck Americans inl
1
The courses are part of the five-credit.
siblity} a nonprofit organizathe anti-slavery crusade docriment1
: '·
tropical marine science program.
tion based in Cambridge.
t
ed in correspondence, speeches, esj
For more information, contact Dr. Arsays, pamphlets and reform jour
Sheldon
coordinatorBerman, national ;~ ·. nal~., The collection is a. j.dii:tt pro]
of the event,
thur J. West at the Suffolk University;cbi:
said about 100 schools took
ology department, Boston MA, 02114,,pr
ject of Suffolk Uni_versity ahd th
'
part in ~assachusetts.
1
call 723-4700, ext. 347. Deadline for apJ
_Muse~~ of Afro-American Hist~ry.l ·
The students showed a
plying is Oct. 20.
· •
1f_·.=~
rcixtui-e of despair and hope
when.faced with the possibility of atomic holocaust.
"If there's going to be a
nucle,ar war there's nothing
we can do to stop it," said
BOS1'0N SI.INOA't GLOBE
BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE
one student at Cambridge
BOSTOU, MA
BOS1DN, i'J\/.\
Ringe and Latin ·School.
"What are we · going to do,
S. oo&,3S9
ask Russia 'Please don't do
AUG. 29, 1982
it?"'
"There's two ways the
·----~
arms race can end," said
. another, ,Zachary· Andrien.
"It can end by stopping it or
it can end with everybody
dead."
Snffa)k'-(Jniyersity wm offer two post-bacca-:
Organizers of the events
/
1,~
laureate certificate programs in computer sci- :
Su~k Unlver.,ity taw Schoo1 ·
said making students aware
ence applications this fall. The Physical and ' has esta~isheda Center for Profesof nuclear issues is vital a
Computer Science Applications Center (PCSAP} sional Development for practicing
vital part of education.
.r
integrates computer science applications with i attorneys featuring one-day collo"As teachers, we prepare C
students for the future," said o . the disciplines of chemistry. mathematics· and : quia on recent legal developments
· ,physics,· while the Life Studies and Computer i and multi-day institutes.
Abigail Erdmann, an EngScience Applications Certfficate Program
lish 'teacher at Brookline
Suffolk Law Professor Charles·
High ' School. '"Education s.
(LSCACP) blends a general background in biol- . indregan, who is chairing the
0
that does not acknowledge
ogy with computer science applications.
,• center, said that the faculty ofthe
the. possibility of nu.clear
Both programs acidress the need of liberal law school is committed to expandholocaust leaves stude.rits in
arts graduates for the· technical . expertise re-· ing opportunities for members of
the dark.';
·
·
quired to enter the computer &cience and data the bar in the field of continuing le'At
Watertown
High
processing fields.
.
, .
.. gal education.
School( Professor Vahe Sara- ,
F.or more information, contact Barbara:
0
fiap, .. a Soviet specialist at
Gralfa, director. of PCSACP, "~t 723~470{t,
Suffolk University, argued
ext.138, or Dr. Be~trice Snow, director
agamsf. a~_~e on nuclear
LSCACP at 723-4700, ext. 245. •
,
weapons.
··
t
·, .. · . . • .;
· On.e student responded
:, .~i.:-_..._
_:.,.·-·-~-~:.;_ ·--.- ...~~ •.~
h~~t~qly. "The only way we
can he free of the nuclear
tfu:eat=ts the total destruction\ of. ,nuclear weapons,"
said- Nick Zammirelli. "I'm
16 years i old, and Tm Sick
and tired of the threats, I
don't want to kill the Sov;;·
et
{ people and I don't think that
\ they want to kill us.

-

0

.

re~

i'•.'.•1,,,.~:,
..

New·.comptit@r.st.udies
at Suffolk University·

1

of,,1·

• -0

1

~*(~~.tLL·'°~-,··~·:~,; . . .. · ·.

\ • <._:-

This clipping
cnes you late
rea
did not
because we
.
... paper
receive t,,e
promptly.
Please e)(cuse
the delay.

Men'S,HOop Team takes.,
·"erks·liire Classic· ,· ·· ·
now at s~-1.
J

-··.

.,

New England
Newsclip Agency

,t.,

by Kevin Mahoney
I

The SMU's Men's Basketball, keyed
by strong team def~hs~ and.rebound- .·
ing, won.all three' oftheir games last
. week. The first two victories gave .
th~m the Berkshire Classic Champion. ship.
··. .
,
The team competed in the Berkshire
Classiclast weekend. On Saturday·
night, SMU defeated defending
champion, VVilliams, by a score of
74-67. Then on Sunday, they held off a
late· surge by North Adams, towin the
champion~hip'round80-7.7. !twas the
Corsairs'nrstye~rfo the:fout~team
tournament.
Along with a 13 point win over Eastern Nazarene College, the Corsairs are.
undefeated iti their last four games.
The wins helpep them raise their record to an impressive5-1 on the young
;~_eason.. ·. i ·. . , · . , ·, . .,,,, S~IU will loo~ to.win their ~exUwo
g~s and carl]Y a 7-J record mto· ·
' , Christmas breaik. The Cprsairswere to
hostSul(oJk,Uqi~_r-~_ityj~_filJ!!~!;.... ~ ~-""'
Coach Bruce"Wneelerwa;s ob,ce·again · •·
expecting a tough opponent. ''they
(Suffolk) will look to slow the pace
down," said Wheeler. ''.We:-must
make them runlwith us.'' Thlfinal
' _game before the vacationwiil bear
-, home this comibgTuesday night,
when'the Corsairs go against Roger
Williams College. "They (Roger Will·iams) will run right up and down the
court with us.''.

one as well, 56~38. Bob\Gonetwas the
leadtng rebounder with 10. Benson
and Kurt MacDon.ald bqth pulled down,
nine while Be.ale and Lunqberg.grabbed eight a piece, Gonet also led the
Corsairs in scoring with 16 points. ·
,MacDonald and Riddick had 15 and .
Beale and Benson ·scorecn4 and 13 re. .
/
.
spectively.
Leading the North Adarps' attack
w!i's ~effReed with 2Jyeftnts./Matt
Trulhadded17moJ'.B', ·
,.
.
SMU had ttw,game well in hand until the latter minutes of the contest:'
The Corsairs ,led 40-30. at the half and
had the leadto 18 points with justS:22
· left to play. Then the Corsairs fell in,to I
a foul shooting slump. North Adams
wasforced to foul to get the ball and
keep SMUfrom running outthe clock. j
.TI:te Corsairs.\\'.ere .ipissing their, foul
··
shots in the one-and-one situation, and'. :

~~r:e.t:::~:::t~;:1;!~;\:t~:
:r:~.o.h~i~ ~r-1·
.
down
'I

)~1!:_g:fell to two QOJtits.

· · . __

,: .

cth~~.1~!1·.~w.;~:t.oh
.
~~dp~~lii·h·
.
team on t_opby three'. North Adams ·
then came
bufwis'ilnable to ''
'score·, ' ·.r ,,
....,,
"We shot the ball well from outside," commented Coach Wheeler.
"It was ouritiability to shoot foul shots
that allowed them (North Adams) to
stay in the game." The Corsairs lih
just 37 of 78 foul shots, less than fifty

I

Luuege, rne Lors.airs,are·
It::1L L':J, p1a.y. ·:.1. uc:11
\....u1:,a11~ _1c:11 111,1..v
undefeated hi their last four games. a foul shootitig slump. North Adams
wasforced to foul to get the balland
The wins helpep them raise their reckeep SMU from running out the clock. /
ord to an impressive5-lon the young
.·. l ·
. ' . > .. , .
,,,_
,season;··
Th_e Corsairs .were .missing their, foul.
···
. shots in the one-and-one situation, and·
s,vrn will look to win their next.two
North Adams-was able to score. With
ga~es and cart a 7-1 record. into' ·
.· just seven secqn~~ rernai,ning, SMU's
, Christmas breaik. The Corsa1rswere to
J~ad fellto two ~hits ' '..••.. ,•. ·•, -- . ' ,.
host Sulfol~_!]ni~r~tt¥J~i~hL~ ~'.:.·
Coacti Bruce Wneeler was on"t:e~gahl · ,., ';:·tfo'if'l:!t:\vffih~ifouieatiffiffi'e'lin ·:-- ·-·~
the first of two fret!'throwstoputhis
,
expecting a tough opponent. ''They
teamon topbythiee.,NorthAdams
(Suffolk:)willlookto slovythe pace
then came down &ut:"w~s lmable to .
down," said Wheeler. ''.We,must ·
score; .,. ,
make them runlwith us.'' Tfici'final
. _ga:mebefore th~vacationwill bear
"We shot the ball well from outhome this comiµg Tuesday night,
side,'' commented Coach Wheeler.
'' It was our inability to shoot foul shots
w~e!1 'the Corsairs go against Roger
Wllhams College. "They (Roger Willthat allowed them (North Adams)to
·iams) will run right up and dqwn the
~t~Y in the game." The Corsairs hit
court with us.''
·
Just 37 of 78 foul shots, less than fifty
percent. · ·
Both t>f the games wiH begin at 8:00
in the SMU gyifln1tsium.-.s',!.We-l>tavg,
-~,ll!_theconsolation game ~ftheto.urnseen both teams play,'' stated Wheel~
er, ''the)! will both be tough. games;''· · ·
the Tournament MVP. He and teamIn the most recently:-pfayed.game,
. mate Bob Gonet were both chosen tb ·
the Corsairs took advantage of a strong ·
tlw: five.man An Tournament Team. .
.rebounding.ed,ge to dump Eastern
The otqer three members were Scott
Nazarene. SMU pulied down 51 re- .
O!s~>n (Williams), Jeff Reed ( North
'bounds fo ENC's 32. "We playeclex7
, Adams), and John Koutsoufalkts (Hel-.
cellent'team defense," ·says Wheel•
leriic).
,
·
_
er, ''and our press really cop.fused ..
While North Adams State defeated
them."
··
.. Hellenic to earn the rigp.t to play tnthe
s'tan Benson w'as majo~ factor in
champiorrspips, SMlJwas handing
the game. He scored 23 points while
Williams a.,seven point Jo~s. Although
grabbingl4 rebounds. "He (Benson)
SM:U pulle9 offit y}ctory, they did lose
really, l\act ;m excellent game;'' comp:· ·.
Mark Pokora in the first halt Pokora
lemented Wheeler. Steve Beale added
~a~ alr~ady #~Jnpiled 15 poiµ.ts, mostly
18 points., while Paul Lundb~rgJ14)
on o~ts~~e shgohng; b,efore he sprainand Guy'.Riddick(lO) were also in
, e9 9i~ a,i;ikle. As a'result, Pokora·missdouble figures. Riddick;also dished ·'
i!d't:he nexttw<'> games and was not '
out atiozen assists·on the night.
s~hieduled to plaf in last n\ght's g~me.
E.N.C. r,an up an·early 8-2lead,be- .·
He ,is expectedJo be back for.next
fore SMU made their move. The Cor-,
Tuesday,!sgame. . ·
. · .
sairs soon overtook E.N;C. and went
. .Gonet took over control and scored
up 14-12; They neverfell behind after
l8 points,.Riddick and MacDonald ,
that point. The lead was as high as 10
added 15 and 12 tespectively. Olson
points during the opening half and ·
was Williams' high scorer with .17 .. ··.
ended with the Corsairs leading 44~34.
SMU'.s full-court pressure causecla.
SMU pushed the lead up to 13 in the
number of turnovers, andthey capitalsecond half but E.N.C. whittled it
ized on ·many steals for fastbreak laydown 'tojust six points wi,th about 6:00
ups.
,
left to play. The lead was soon back inThe Corsairs were in coritrolfrom
to double figures, where it stayed for
the outset and held on to the lead . '
the remainder of the game. Clay Ham~
throughout the entire ball game. 0 The
day led the Nazarene attack with 22
whole team picked up the slack while
points.
Pokora was out," said.Wheeler. He is
The second game of the week was·
pleased with the way that the team has
the three point win over North Adams
played without Pokora in the lineup.
State. The Corsairs held another ,·
\. · '
sttong rebounding advantage in that .
cru 1'lazan::m;:

u~~

1

·~:r:;~J~;"iiiddi~;~~*'fif"'-·

a

S~U f~rward Stan Benson shows his foul shoo~ing touch from the free

L'hrowhne. .

·' .

· ~-·,--~

·~.

\

\

'.

.

.,,, ..,

-

11.:!,,11,./J- 1.1 I -

MEDFORD DAIL'{ M£RmJRI
MEDFORD,.M
J).

9,-400.

DEC

9 1982

Rew
EmlP411d
Ne~U{li
-

'

- - .----,--

:

. ~ra4)or, Fama on varsity ,

;Suffolk


U;, hoop has loclllflavor

i

BOSTON ·-- Suffolk Uni~ . bury along with guards Jim
. "~~ity'~ · basketabH team . McHo~ of Weymoth, Joe
·opened its 1982:-83 season by' Allen of Jamaica Plain Anplay~ in _the Babson In- dy Trainor ot Medford,' Don
vitational Tournament, a 'Spellman. of Dedham •and
four-fieam, affair in!,Olving BillZarellaofBrocktoh.
Suffolk, Babson, Salem
.The depth of the team is
Sta~8:ftd·CUIT)7~~ege.
'evident by the return ·o(·
. .eo~ch .Jim Nelson's. these veterans and the
r::~111s,.,captaineq_,by_,gu~<t quality of tµe newco~ers.
. :Sill,. Mccarron, a. senior : Among the, newcomers. are
, from Dorchester, .hope_to._ Paul Dooley, a _6'4"
·· ilnprcive on an 9-17 record of.· freshman from South
last ~son'. Coa~ Nelson is · Bosto~, .Chuck M~~. a
. pleased With bQUi the quan- i SC Or 1D g ~ p hl y,m a k 1D g
tity and quality of · this :· ·rreshman guard from QUin. year's tW'Jlout and sees that , cy, Leo Farma, a 6'5."
, goal, as reachable. There freshman from l\{edford,
, ·were ten lettermen. among Mic}lael Condakes, a
'the : 33". · candidates who . freshman from Winthrop,
•· _i'ep9rted ·. to the first: and two transfers, David
: workout. .. .
.,,
·. · Gray, a 6'3" grard . from
" : .. TQp -· ''offensive threats; ' Stonehill Colle(e, rony Tier-,
. returning will be 6'8'Jcenter ·. no, a 6'l" JunIOl' from
.'John :·McDonough of Dor-; Somerville, who attended
._ ,chester, Wholed the-team in,, 13unker Hill Community Col-·
t scoring last ;year with 460' lege,
and .(guard Jeff
. points, an_average of 17.r Gagnim, a sophomore from
po~ts 'per ·gaine.:' Another: Brome, N.Y. ,
' k~y ·returning member is: Nelson, wtio is starting his
. AJJ,dy pagle; a 6'5" forward. seventh se~n as/coach of
: fl'om Bylerica, .who' scor~: the. Rams, is optimistic
®& : P9mts_ .last year, , an: about the season: "I am of
: aver~ge of 15.6 poin~ per I the belief tha~ the,' 1~'-83
1, game, as well as leading inj pr.ogram
will be the
' assists with 88: · . · , 1 . ~trongest the University bas
>. ·, . Other returning front fielded over.the the past four
t court ,ll!~!l'...are §'3" · Jo}m years~ I share my en! ·Doherty of&imerville and _.thusiasm with, assistant
'6'3'~ ~q Cr<l~~~x~. :, coach -~Y:811 ,J,ittle . ·
1 •



,,

looking forward to Suffolk
University's return to NCAA
Division ·III prominence;•·
said Nelson.
,
The Rams will play a 26gairie sclledule including,

'

games against Division U
Merrimack College and
University of Lowell as well
as appear in a, Christmas
· Holiday Tournament ~
Salem State.
·

,..

QUINCY SOI
QUINCY,MI.

w. 8,500

JUN1 '11982

·1,

·

DOREEN MATTA of Quincy was a member of the Suff~lk Unive~ity
women's basketball team. A ·graduate of Cathedral High, she is a
journalism major, _a Dean's List student and editor of the Beacon
Yearbook. ··
·
"'----~:.._--~~,:B,±':"'=~~~c'-'=~,,.,=,,.,==:,,:==::==..__.

ftBIS.llllUIIE

WALlHAM, ML

D. 15.360

DEC '1

1982

MORNING UNION
SPRINGFIELD, :MA

Braride1s·vv-omenhoopsters tri~mph
'

WALTHAM - The Brandeis
University women's basketball'
team broke out to an early lead and
survived a second-half Suffolk rally,
coming away with a 5~ctory
Monday night.
The Judges took a 10-point lead into the locker room, at halftime, 2818, but Suffolk came roaring back
with an 18-4 spurt that put them up .
36-32, with 12 minutes left in the ·
game.
.
. .
.
Brandeis regained their composure, taking the lead with five
minutes left and were never headed.
.
The Judges registered a babmced
scoring .attack, placing· three
players in double figures. Jeann

APR. 6, 1982

-~ . ~ ·1· 1\_,~( •".'._;:s:r_-. ,.]ie~·
.. ,m1,:·1on to-~d·

O'Neill led the way with 12 points,
while ·Joan Matsumoto and Petra
Farias chipped in with 10 apiece.
The victory boosted the Judges to
5-1, as they prepare to travel to
Tufts on Wednesday.

.

The Summary:
BRANDEIS(50lcMatsumoto 4-210; Farias 4-2-10; Bowler 1-2-4;
Cromie 2-0-4; Neri 2-0-4; O'Neill 6-012; Jaul 3-0-6. Tot. 22-6-50 ·
SUFFOLK(44)-Thomas 4-1-9;
RUBeakas 4-1-9; McBirney 1-0-2;
Lewis 2-1-5; Scanlon 8-1-17; Laffey
0-2-2. Tot. 19-6-44.
· Score by halves:
Brandeis ·............... 28 · 22-50
Suffolk ................. 18 26-44

BOSTON, MA

JUN 14 \982

.

. .. ·..

.

.

L.
-~9

It's· up to U$ _to face wa,p·;~
author tells Suffolk grad_s

· It is tip to the people, not the government, to firid an answer to the
threat of nuclear war, author-photog-. _
rapher-movie director Gordon Parks ·
said yesterday.
_ Parks, who directed the movie
"Shaft" and was the first black pho' tographer for Lif-e maga7,:ine, was addressing 600 graduated of S ~
University's College o{ Liveral Arts
and School of Management at the.
Hynes Veteran's Auditorium •.
"Nuclear war is a distant· possibility and we must learn to live with
the knowledge of it," Parks said. "We
must come to realize that both sides
are vulnerable and that there could be
no w.inners in such an exchange.
"What is the an.swer?"., he continued. "Well, the superpowers don't
have it. They only have weaporis. It is
up to you and me to: give thought
about .this terrible possibility."
Parks urged grauduates to mak~ a
· «concerted effort" to make the na_tt'?-~:.-~§~.tn~ ·. w<>rld .''r~cogntze UiE!ir
'

. ·.,'

/\;'..: .

,__

.

.

'

··:::~

.

'

BOSTON (AP) .:__ From 500,000 t<;> a miJ}ion
pe9ple would die in an all-out ~uclear attack Of!
Massachusetts even if the state's "minimail'
nu~lear protection program worked at its best, a
state C1vil Defense officiaJ estimated Monday.
"It's survivable," said Douglas Forbes, director
of plannjng for the Massachusetts-Civil ·nef~nse
agency, of such an attack. "The survivors wouldn't
like what they come out to. It would be •grim."
' Forbes, speaking to about 2·5 people, mostly stu- dents, at Suffolk University's Science Week progrli.m on tiie coliS€qaii11tes of nuclear war, did no~
explain how he arrivld at his,~eath toll1estimate.
Massachusetts has a population of about 5. 7, mil·
lion. 'He said the estimated U.S. death toll in a
nuclear war would be 40 to 50 mi~lion people,
even if plahs to protect peQple thro\lgh reloca~ion
and ·community shelters worked.
· Forbes said ab@t 3,cents.pet personin f~e,ral~ _
money is sperit in Massachusetts on nuclear prif.
tectio.n. "The program that we have is certainly
minimal" When we talk about 'spending 3 cents per ,
person in the state, I think that's ridiculous." _
. In Forbes' opinion, nuclear war is "probably the
least likely thing that will ever happen" but hav- .
ing a plan to protect people is a deterent.
.
Forbes explained _that nuclear protection plans
which include relocatation from "risk" areas"
deter nuclear war by eliminating any Soviet strategic aclvanta·ge in loss of life. He said the plans
also would buy timeJor diplomacy,,while sav!ng
millions of lives.
'To do nothing,, while we're waiting for the
weapons to, go away, just doesn't make _sense," he
told the students.
· '
Forbes said federal government reviews in the
J970s rou~hly confirmed ~vie£ claims they _could
protect 90 percent. or more of their population,
while. the U.S. would suffer 50 percent in casual~
ties in a nuclear war.
Forbes claimed that if there is no time to relocate people before an attack, those whose survive
in publ.ic shelters and fortified .basements ..woul~ .
be told how to continue to evade the effects
~31tion. • . , ." :
1

.D. 286,101



\

if N-homh hits,'

'BOSTON ffERALD ~MERICAN

\

.

'

contributions to the possibilty of such
a holocaust and to fmd a doctrine of
defense other than one of threat and
retaliation."
-

09

:-o-._/

BOSTOR f!tiBII

STANDAR:11-J]MES

BOSTON.. M&.

NEW BEDEORD. D
wooNSO.GKET: r;M;l;

It.~

OCT 26112

WQONSOCKEl's Rf

New

England
Newsclip

D. 50,lOQ

D. 32,so<l

MSffUA TEtEGRAPH
-- 11A$11UA. ""·

- . ·"' I). 24,ol»

APR 6 1982

New
England

61982

1982
GAPE GOD TIMfl
HYANNIS, Ml.

. .wtidii;

D. 27.121

/Mas;.-CD officials:

N-attack 'survivable
By MARY WESSLING
Associated Press Writer

BOSTON (AP) - Even if an estimated
500,000 to o~e million people died in an
all-out nuclear attack on Massachusetts,
a state Civil Defense official calls such
an assault "survivable."
"It's survivable," Douglas Forbes, director of planning for the Massachusetts
Civil Defense agency, said Monday
about an attack. "The survivors wouldn't
like what they come out to. It would be
grim."
He estimated that many people would
die in such an attack even if the state's
"minimal" civil defense worked to maximum efficiency.
He did not explain how he arrived at
his ·death toll estimate. Massachusetts
has a population of about 5.7 million. ,
Forbes estimated the U.S. death toll in
a nuclear war would be 40 to 50 million
Saj1p1k University professor Vahe Sarafian _people, even ifpiap.s fo protect people
at antinuclear teach-in a~ Watertown . : through relocation and community shelJlfgn School yesterday. Seated 1s state Sen. ; ters worked.
-'~~~£.l!rac~._
GLOBE PHOTO BY JOE RUNCI _
Forbes called nuclear war "probably
the least likely thing that will ever hap-·
pen" but he said having a plan to protect
.,, people was a deterrent to nuclear war.
:1 Forbes said about 3 cents per person
,, in federal money is spent in Massachusetts on nuclear protection. He disclosed
, , no total amount.
''' { "The program that we have is certain- .

~P,~~ks

' topic
,Days
ill· schools:

,

'

1

nitclear war
By R.S. Kindleberger
-.OlobeStaff
·students at scores of schools in Massachu-: · "
setts yesterday turned their attention to a subject many would prefer to ignore _: the threat of
nuclear war .
..• · It wa.s the first National Day of Dialogue, a11_: ..'
event that the Cambridge-based national orga- .
riizers hope will lead to students learning about ,. '
the nuclear arms race as part of their regular
curriculum.
~
The subjec(was grim, but the message was;"\:
not all negative. There is. reason .·for hope; _stu~ ,, ,,,
derits were told at several observances, if citi-'; -~
zensbegin to work together to reduce the th_r:~at.,." .'.'
The comments of some students suggestthah ,,, f~elirigS of hopelessness engendered by ·1h~_'~.~~threatof nuclear war affect mapy of thf~· . . _·. ··'..'

APR 6

ly minimal," he said. "When we talk
about spending 3 cents per person in the
state, I think that's ridiculous."
Forbes spoke to about 25 people, mostly students, at Suffolk University's Science Week program on the consequences of nuclear war. ,
Forbes said that nuclear protection
plans that included relocafation fr-om
"risk" areas deterred nuclear war by
eliminating any Soviet strategic advantage in loss of life. He said the plans also
would buy time for diplomacy, while
saving millions of lives.
"To do nothing,. while we're waiting
for the weapons to go away, just doesn't
make sense," he told the students.
Forbes said federal government reviews in the 1970s roughly confirmed
Soviet claims-they could protect 90 percent or more of their population, while
the United States would suffer 50 percent in casualties in a nuclear war.
He said the Soviets had a plan for
relocating their people away from potential target areas. "If they get away
from these areas, they can survive a
blast," he said. ·
·
Forbes claimed if there was no time to
relocate people before an attack, those
whose survived in public shelters and
fortified basements would be told how to
continue to evade the effects of radiation.

1982
i

. ··n tnere·s going to be a nuclear wart said a,~·:'
!;l.tudent at Cambridge Riildge and ,Latin School;:·:','.
''there's nothing we can do to stop it. What .are. ; ·
,. we going to' do. ask Russia 'Please dori'.t do it?' ,, .·: : .
•· •.. Her comment came during a discussion fol~ ···
; lowfri!ftne showfiig :to several hundred students •, .~
001 grimly realisUc film by the British Broad- ·
ic'~~ting Corp. 1:hat ,showed the probable effects
a nuclear strike on England.
"There's two ways the arms race can end,"·
.commented another student. Zachary A.ndrien.
"It can end by stopping it or it can end with
'
everybody dead."
Abigail Erdmann, an English teacher at
Brookline High School, said at a press conference that 80 percent of her students believe
there will be a nuclear war in their lifetime that .
none of them will survive. ·
·
"As teachers, we prepare students for the fu~
ture," Erdmann said. "If there is to be no future,
education is.not only·pointless, it is a cruel charade. Education which does not acknowledge
. the ·possibility of nuclear holocaust leaves stu- · '·dents in the dark."
, Much of the discussion about what could be
• done to insure there is a future focused on the
proposal for a nuclear weapons freeze. Stat~
:~11,_ 9~rge Bacllrac;.h {D0 Watertown) spoke at
Watertown High Schoonn support of a such a
,Jr~ze . ./provided it were agreed to by both the
Uhited States and the Soviet Union and could be
,. verified.
.
·
. . Most of the 500 students who attended the
discti~sion in Waterfowri appeared to support a
freeze.'Student speakers urged their classmates
to mak(! their feelings k11ow'rt to Washington .
and to lobby on behalf pf Question 5. The non· ·
binding referendum, on. the Massachusetts ballot next Tuesday, calls on President Ronald Reagan and Congress to work toward a nucl~ar
weapons freeze.
Prof. Vahe Sarafian, a Soviet' specialist at
Suffolk University, and two doctoral candidates
at .the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy ar. gtied at the assembly against a freeze, contend~
fng it would undermine n~tional security.
Niclc Zammirelll. a Watertown High School
student. responded heatedly to that'. argument.
"The only way we can be free df the nuclear
threat is the total destruction of nuclear weap- : ·
ons," l:::te said. 'Tm 16 years old; and I'm.sic~',
and tired of threats. I don't wantto kill the Sovh ·
et people•and I don't think that they'want tp ~I~~~~'.

of

u~.''

" ,. . ,. .

Educators for SociaLResponsibility, a national nonprofit organization that sponsored the
day. estimated that more than 1000 schools
-participated nationwide.. About l 00 schools
took part in Massachusetts, according to. Sheldon Berman, the even.l's national coordinator. , .
., aecause of a half day in Boston, most schools··C?,.
tl;lere did not holcl programs yesterday. Some,., J
like Boston Latin, were expect~d to address the' t>
issue today or later in t.he week;
.
' ,, _
v
After the morriihg movie at Cambridge
Rindge & Latin, students
Alan Weinstein,'
science class joined a discussion led by Rob1
Avery, a Harvard Medical School student. Tb,
topic was the medical tmplications of nuclea
war. arid some oftt w:aswas pteclictabJy:gdsly.

But after a while, the student~· turned .theit ,
.attention td what could be done to prevent a im~ ~ '
dear war. '
: ,
.: ' •·· · ,· : ,.
t,·
/i !"'JYt)u '1dok at TV,Y put in classmate 'Davicl'l !
. B~1Jley, i•and all these people are saying, 'No}~
·ntikes, rio:nukes,' and you think they're allju/;;f .f..."
· hippie's•.'·You should have doctors, lawyers.(,,:;:1
Everybody's got to·get out."
. ·
ec'";:_~
, ''Excellent point," agreed Weinste,in.
. e:;:,,;;i
. Contributing to thlS report were Globe re~:if';
porters Phyllis Coons and J< 1nethJ. Cooper.\'.):)

in

J

,_,,

APR 21 ~

~

-- - - - ~ ~ i-----

~2nii

------~~-~~

. ---,-----~~-----;-c-c----,-,--,,----.-,----:c -

!s'en. Rotondi'.
'/

BOSTON
State Senator S~m
the chief executive could utilize him
as Lt. Governor, to benefit his adRotondi, D-Winchester, made his
,
·
.
·
ministration.
· official announcerpent Sunday for
In addition to the role of a~visor,. the office of I'..ieutenant Governor at

he sees the LL Governor as ,helping
; aFaneuil Hall press conference.
to implement· ·reform Jeg(slatiori
Addressing close to a thousand
, supporters, Rotondi stated, "Massa-. -enacted by the le~slattire in.order to
· chusetts state government is facing - reassert the control of the executive
,: crucial -chalienges in the_ 1980s as it
branch in this area.
'. attempts to maint.ain a quality of life
·He expressed concern Uiat, "the
: (or. its people in a time -of limited courts have .been too· often called
; re.sources.
upon to interpret le~slative intent
. "I would like, as Lt. Governor, to
because of the_ failure of the
': ijdvise and assist the governor lll le~slative ·and executive branches
:· formulating policies fo meet those to effectively implement the laws
they pass."
·
: challenges.''
Sen. Rotondi, a third term
'leg~slator, whose district includes
(Woburn, Winchester, Arlington and
; Lexington, !s -~_ pr9m!!~mt!1LvJctim
!-fights, jurfreforrri> and civil service
•reform legislation , in the I state _
·Senate.
.,
He presently serves as chairman
.,Qf the public service committee, and,
·vice .:~airman of the t~ation
··committee.
P.rior to · his ' tenure in the
: legislature, Rotondi worked as
; director of le~slation ·for the Massa~
'chusetts Bar Association.
, • Rotondi rioted that although the
(1982 race for ·u. Governor appears
: as crowde<l as this year's Boston
:Marathon, he was confident that he
:would be set apart from the other
Sen. Sam Rotondi
:contenders by virtue of his sound
:legislative record, personal .backHe pointed to the civil service ·
:ground, and experien<!e. ·
reform bill, lanamark legislation to
•- "I offer more than an expertise in
restructure the state's personnel
:one area. I offer a knowledge ~nd system, as an example. . ·
:linderstanding of _
all the · maj<>f'
"The· personnel reform law will
:issues · before _us: ~ause I have requir~ constant scrutiny over the
:been an active participant in next few years if its important
[debating them. This resource could results are to be realized.
/be .• a, tru~> asset to apy ad- · "I am confidenfthat any governor i
; . .
r ministration.''
.-.
.
would grant me, the co-author of .
i ( Rotondi stressed that , he was that vital reform bill, the respi>ri- I
~~il}g j9_( L~. Q<>v~m,~Jo ~gfk,., ,sibilitvtoheloimolemenht:" . -·' · ,

---

-----

- -

------

l

During War Prq~d
L.A. Times-Washington Post News Servi~e:

to run for
Lt. Governor

·1
'

~c~·,J
-o.~HyNews, T"!sday, 1:/iay 18, 1982

, )WASHINGTON-~-- Government
itl~estigators said lv.i\:mday it. is "a
lo:rig leap" between , charging_· that
Byelorussian/,Nazis entered the
United States 30 years ago and
proving that they were guilty _
of
wartime atrocities that would strip
them of their U.S. citizenship.
Meanwhile, Justice Department
officials said they have been investigating for nearly a year information
th.at indicates the _Pentagon was
"less than candid" in answering
questions from., congressional i:rives~
tigators about Byelorussian Nazis .
T.he acknowledgment came 1n the
wake of an allegation Sunday by a
foriner Department of Justice lawyer, John Loftus,Jh_at Byelorussian
__
Nazi.I I
. l~ed into the Unite
ed· States by '"U.S. intelligence officials to assist them in anti-Soviet
intelligence activity.-_.,,
Loftus, now in private law prac.tice in Boston; said lY[onday in an interview that he will provide details
of the alleged: ,sch~me in a Book,
"The Belarus ·Se.cret," to be pub~

lished in Septeml'!er, _· .
._
So :fat(: iio;~;Velor!}i{slll,is ~ave
: been _among the· former Nazis i:lifd colla:J:foi:a.tors . the goyentrnent'· has.·
taken)o :co\µf tcr,strip of their citizenship. The government has won
nine of the 26 cases and the other 17
are still in litigation.
. Allan A, Ryan, director of the Department of Justi~e's office of spe~
cial investigations, said Monday
that more cases are now under investigation and that he hopes they
will be brought to court by the end
of the year.
_
·
!llf former. Nazis came -to this
·: country illegally, theyare subject
denaturalization and deportation,"
the department said in a statement
issue'd Monday. But officials noted
that prosecutors must tie an alleged
Nazi to a specific act of persecution
to succeed in winning denaturaliza- _.
tion and deportation proceedings. ·
Loftus said more than 300 Byelorussian Nazis ;i.re living in .the United States. Ryan said the number of
Byelorussian cases under investiga~
tion is less than that.

Chief Development Officer
Suff<:>lk ~niversity, l<?cat~d in the Beacon Hill section of Boston. invites·
nommatlons and applications for the position of Director of Development
Suff<?lk University has a School of Management (2700 students), a Colleg~
of Liberal Arts and Sciences (1900 students). a Law School (1600 students), and has recently completed a successful capital campaign
Suffol~ U niversi.ty is S~eking a senior person to coori:linate development'.
a!umm.a!)d pubhc re.lattons pr<?grams, a!)d to 1ake an active role in major
gift sohc1tat10n. Capital campaign experience 1s essential.
Salary: Competitive, depending upon experience. Application deadline·
June 23, 1982 Send complete resume, names, addresses and phone num:
bers o.f at lea~t five references and a letter indicating salary history and
financial reqmrements to:
·
David M. Thompson
Thompson and·Pendel Associates
911 South 26th Place
Arlington, VA 22202
S\(ffolk University is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, ·
·
Title IX Employer.

to

aFaheuil.Hall press conference.

he. sees the LL .Goyernor as ,t;ielping
Addressing close to a thousand to . iniplemenf reform ~egislatiori
supporters, Rotondi stated, "Massa~. enacted by the legislatqre in order to
chuseUs state government is facing . reassert the control of the executive
crucial chalienges in the 1980s as it branch in this area. · ·
· 'He expressed concern that, "the
attempts to maint.ain a quality of life
: for. its people in a time -of limited courts have .been too often called
>re_rources.
upon to interpret legislative intent
. "I would like, as Lt. Governor, to
because of the. failure of the
': advise and assist the governor iil legislative ·and executive branches
: formulating policies to meet those to effectiyely implement the laws
: challenges."
· ·
·
·
they pass."
· Sen. Rotondi, a · third term
:legi$lator,. whose district includes
:Woburn, Winchester, Arlington and
; Lexington, is ·a proJ?<men.t .QLv.iclim
'"fights, jucyref8rm; aiid civil service
•reform legislation , in the I state .
Senate.
.
He presently serves as chairman
.of the public service committee, and ,
·vice .chairman of the taxation
'committee. ·
·
P,rior to . his ' tenure in the
:legislature, Rotondi worked as
)director of legislation·for the Massa'schusetts Bar Association. ·
; ' Rotondi rioted that although the
; 1982 race for ·u. Governor appears
: as crowdeq as this year's Boston
:Marathon, he was confident that- he
:would be set apart from the other
Sen. Sam Rotondi
i contenders by virtue of his• sound
!legislative record, personal· back·
He pointed to the civil service
;ground, and experience,·
· "I offer more than an expertise in reform bill, landmark legislation to
restructure the state's personnel
;~me area. I offer a knowledge ')and systemj as an example. , ·
:understanding of _all the , major
"The, personnel reform law will
!issues before us: because I 'have
..
:been an active p articipant in require constant scrutiny over the !
,
· ·
next few years if its irriportaht
•.debating them. This resource could
!be .•a, :true. asset to apy ad- results are to be realized.'
;ministration."
. "I am confident that any governor ;
I ,. Rotondi stressed that . he was would grant me,.' the co-author of
hfunning .for U ... Governor to work that vital refdrin bill, the rei;;p0nfwith gov~rrior·. <~, . --~-~-~-as a
;_,; - •He outlined specific roles in which Lt Governor with . r~ent legislative
·

-_ -~IT.ice, ~-he. could pi:ovide a link
I
between the executive branch and.
the legislature.
"I ha:ve developed a working
relationship with the key people in
all branches of state government, as
· well as those individuals who
represent a wide spectrum of groups
and organizations. This gives in~· a
unique dimension in providing· a
vital link between the governor and
the legislature,'' he said.
Rotondi said as a liaison, he would
be able to assist in advancing the
administration's.programs.
Sen. Rotondi is from an ItalianIri~ family of 13 children. He and
his wife, Diane, reside in Winchester
with their 'four children. He is a
graduate of Brown University and
S"lffolk Unive~ty Law School.

a

-.h

,.,

s~~::~;~::ir::~:e::e~i~at

of'

wiiJ;~ - an: allega:tJon Sunday by a
foriner Department. of Justice lawyer,. Joyn Loftus, tl).at; Byelorussi~n
Nazi.I Eh 1 lled mto the United: States by'"U.$. intelligence. officials to assist them . in anti-Soviet
intelligence activity...
Loftus, now in private law prac. tice in Boston, said Monday in an interview' that he will' provide d.etails
of ·the .alleged. s~hfme_ in a book,
"The Belarus Se.cret," to be pub~

denaturaliiation and deportation-,"
the departm¢nt said in a statement
issued Monday. But officials noted
that prosecutors.must tie an alleged
N11zi to a specific act of persecution
-to succeed· in wi:r:ming denat.uralization and deportation proceedings.
Loftus said more than 300 Byelorussian Nazis are living in.the United States. Ryan said the number of
Byelorussian cases under investiga
tion is less than that.
0

. I.

Chief Development Officer
Suff«;>lk !,Jniversity. l(!Cat~d in the Beacon Hill section of Boston. invites·
nommatto~s an~ apphcattonsfor the position of Director of Development
Suff(!lk Umvers1ty has a_ School of Management (2700 students). a Colleg~
of Liberal Arts and Sciences (1900 students). a Law School (1600 students). and has recently completed a successful capital campaign.
Suffol~ U nivers~ty is s~eking a senior person to coordinate development',
a!umm_a!)d pubhc re_lat1ons pr<!grams, and to take an active role in major
gift sohc1tat10n. Capital campaign experience is essential.
Salary: Competitive, dependin~ upon experience Application deadline·
June 23, 1982. Send complete resume, name~. ~ddr~sses and phone num:
bers o_f at lea~t five references and a letter md1catmg salary history and
·
financial reqmrements to:
David M Thompson
Thompson imd·Pendel Associates
911 South 26th Place
Arlington. VA 22202
S!)ffolk University is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action ·
Title IX Employer.
·
·

PATRIOli 1.W.GB
QUINCY. D
o 1J.GII
..

MAY 171982

New
E:Dgland
New.sclip

- Gku-l~a-n~as.,:~~~-==::::=J~;:=:~--~--_~--~,~~~~~,
",./: '~~t.:i:.:,n man traced
. While working for the Ju' r

Ora tors I t:SWe °!n:~i~!J: :i i~:e :ixt~1
'r

\

µi@}e levels and occupations they
!Ilent, Loftus, 32, stumbleds
Depart- children should never know
jptmd here.
information that the State D pon SEJcret should be hunted £
Peace. They
'!!fhe people· are really nice. They
smuggled several hun
epartlllent lives.~·
or the rest of their
have no pretentions at all."
:~rirninaI~ into, the Unit:_e~t!azifwar
The war criminal
'The house they bought is a well·k~pt
· ·_ e Soviet. Union Th
es . rom the Nazis durin th s collabo~ated with
l;luil~ing that horde.rs on being a
IhelPed them be · . : governni;ent the Soviet ug_ e German Invasion of 1_• 1:m1)\~ion-. "It"s an . old ·rull).-runner's
; jobs in excihan coz;ie citizens and find investigation :~~ ~ftus said his .'1c_·~---/·µse," Loftus said. '
. '
covert spy opeJ~ or taking ~art i~ a laborators from th re . o~ the col·,
, LoftUs, marne on,.
:.
Byelorussia.
e Soviet Republic of {daughter, says thd with a_ 5~month-01d
Many have bee Ii .
i
responsible. for ~ar cnmmais were this country for 30n . vmg unnoticed in
Soviet Jews. Man mg th~usands : of
"I kn .
.
years.
were. buried alive. Y were children wpo In the :'m:1::re the bodies are buried.
SBS
Loftus, now workin
:
Byelorussian a;;!hs~. Euphrosynia 's
firm said .h
g for a Boston law New Jersey is the . m South River,
ope~tion
wor~ed to reveal the
, . , grave of the highest. . Use, people Who killed
illC,lUU1110 opw•o-·-~~, .
" ,
,.- . .
(Please see LOFI'Us - Page 13) I, J
Many Byelon.tSsians collaborated
I
-"__)
,with the Nazis in hopes of winning their -very ll eDJoy this ror a re~t..,..,,end, ;;he - · .-,.u-..__ .
glad that it's coming fo an
·
·freedotp from Soviet rule, Loftus said;
said. "Part of me hopes the story goes
When he left tut.;~-. _
,
"The Soviet Union lost 20 million
on, but I'd just as soon stay in the
last year, Loftus moved to Roc1-..~-- ,
people in World War II," Loftus said. , background. I think Congress is going to
because he was · attracted· by the
"They let the butchers of their own
citizens go free so a handful of Soviet
agents could exploit them. That's
•barbarism."
From 1979 untilJast May, Loftus was
;assign~_ to. the .Justice Departmenfs
Office of
Investigatfons: For twci'
·years he · researched the entry ·of
suspected war criminals into the United
States.
He took last summer off to write
book about the material he uncovered. It
will be . published in September by
Alfred A. Knopf of New York under th'e ,
title,. "The Belarus Secret.;,
Patriotleclgm Staff

{e

aOCKLt\N])
. ,. "
comfort qf his Ii -:-"" Relaxing in the
is friendly
vmg room, John Loftus
is rui urgen;~n°:re1E:ntious. But there
about un · . ·- . voice When he talks
· · PUDished Nazi war, criminals
Loftus, a former us J . · ·. · . ·
ment investigator, ~o~edu~tzc; Departlast September. , Little .. o ~ckland
neighbors know that he /id . his new
one .of the most sh~d uncovered
World War n.
- secrets of
Last ?ight, Loftus unlocked his . . •
on
s 60 Minutes and h
.. secret'
to himself as a "fiv
t e now refers
e cen celebrity."

fl

bee!

-

r--

Spectaf

a

f

-King· nominate.s ·four o fill.

.While ~Byeforussia was under Nazi
coritrol; one-fourth of the population was
extenninated. Some 750;000 Jews perished, including some bab~es buried
alive to save ammunition. Their killers
decided that infants would be unable to
crawl out of the mass graves they were
dumped in.
·
Loftus was born five years after the
war ended. When he started to dig into
the records of various federal agencies,
he .Jqiew virtually nothing about his
assigned subject. ·
•._ · ''l'liad never heard of Byelorussia,''
' h~ said.~ "I had hardly ever heard of
~ Worid War Il or the Holocaust. I was
·1_>retty shocked by what I found."
~..oftus. said he wrote the book as a
.warning: "There will be another
Holocaust. If we're going to keep our
' children safe, we have to know the
' mi~takes of the past and teach them to
the riexfgeneration."
CBS interviewer Mike Wallace riever

(I~~e:1::~i\!~ro~g::h~t!~: 1;

.e

William J. 'Tierney of Milton,, contributions (rom Ma
By Charles Kenney
nominated for· a judgeship in the was one of his most 8.1
Globe Staff
p~ign supporters in the l
Boston Municipal Court:
Gov. Edward J. King yesterday
primary election King
• · ~1a~y B. fyf use o_f Brookline, . chael S. Dukakis, and f1
· nominated,_ four persons as judges.
nominated for a position at the Suf- husband. Robert Muse:
three of them to fill judgeships created two days ago when he signed • folk.. County Probate and Family
'. The four. nominee:
Cotirt;,
leglslation, which he had proposed,
''horn· would be ·paid(
creating 14 new judicial positions,
• Jud e James J. Nixon of Bel. ar, were approved by
The four individuals nominated
mont, .who is currently a distri~,t
's Judicial Nominati:
by the governor yesterday wer~:
court judge in Cambr~d~e and wa!;, t which scr~ns peop
• New Bedford Mayor John A.
nominated to a position on the f~ judgeships, All th
Markey. who was nominated 3i-s
.' nts must be -appro•
state. Superior Court.
justice of the New Bedford District
· ate Executive Council
, King had received camp:i~n
Court:
i: All but Markey were
fQr. positions created b)
'ci~n\ly enacted bill esta
a~ditionaf posiUons fo
the state.
; That bill. which was
1iw Tue,sday, mov(
t~rough the Legislaturi
dies from ·Republican
Here are biographical sketch_" -ed $500 to King·~ campaign li:isf , _i,
•.
f' -..L___;.....;..,.~...,_.,.__,.
es of the four 'individuals,· nomi- April. ,,,
William J. Tierney,.·
nated as judges yesterfia.y by
· Tierney, 49, of Milton, is c_ur~ ·
Gov. Edward J. King:
,
rently general counsel t<_~ t~e chi~f
.lnhn A. Markev

n
j'.

Sketches of lawyers, jUdge

·_nominated by gov.ern~r - ·

••

,,,

.·-·

.

:

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~

FATRlmi lQII
QUINCY. D

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~- -~ ~.~ ~-

Pa~e, 1~
t 't>~~~4,~ .-ied.:fro~.eve_r name.-... ·.,is
~~~:
9r1mm~
reGei~
tiienship. His
~··

t~~'\'?- :;a.~t.'

bee~ furious, but not Loftus.
.:
take ovet now/'.
_p
cij:versity of the people who 'live in the
· "Nobody can say i'm d<>ing thidor
Loftus is anxious to devote •his .full ~ :Ile and his_ wife ~e the mix of
~·~t"
~@thelxiok,,,hesaid."Ifl•had.want,dto
attentlontopracticinglawwiththefmn J~e level~ ancl ·occupations they
·~,.~ -~-~ '?- ..•. !ro.wsky, and he was
..
...
dQ that, I would have w;iiteii dntil . of Bingl).am, Dana and Gould'. 1 }le < - ound here.
·
· -·
~ ~ .,,, "
f th N
September." ·
· ·· · · ·- · - conside.rs himself. more attorney ·
than ' · -,iT.·_he
ple· are really ·n·1·ce. They
-'.!l ~ ~ /
. o _ ~ . __azi puppet govfP~~-':aent of Byelorussia: Around him lie
:Before-· going public, LQftus needed
author, and -wants to repay his .;~. J,la\tt? n.o pretentions at all."
,
\
~--~ , .":tier members of th~ Byelorussian .ss
~ationalsecu1'.ityclearancef~rthebtiok.
pl9yers,for thllir support over tire past .•_ 1)~ house they bought i~ a well-k~pt
?~~Q' (~.r;m~ secret ~.Uce). They _we~ . As SOQn as it was declassjfied•,by the months; , _. . . ,_ ., ... _ . . "
.l)uild1ng Qi_at borders on being a
1 . ,r~pons~~le fo.r; dra~g i.lpli~ts of their. CJA;J. c~ed 60 Minutes,g he,s!tld; ,
Loftus is:a native oft>orchester; anll a :. -m!li'l~iott; ...It~ 'arr ol<f 'turn-runner's
1 -,f~ll!)w,cittzens to)~ ~quidated;!! ,' Cc,- ',.,.:,,ov_~i~th"'»teraUy,',.;.,,1,ouus bas grad~~·~f ~¥to.n. Latin~~nfllofton '~l!Se," µitt~s said., '
''
O,ne qf th~e ~uHeii_ with.' Ostro.Wsky is ' .·• become- what 'fie: Galls, ".a· :.five-cent
College. From 1972°'74, .he served on the _I
Emmanu~ J:asnm,a mayor appointed - celebrity." LaWl;lighfhe'li!If~t al . facultyof.tlie.. iny'~,offtcei:candi.d~.tes' 1·
,by ~azi occ?pation forces. "In a single excused hfn!self to ansWer the :el:. • school, finishing as a firSt .Ueutenaht;
dar:~ the village of Kletz, Byelorussia,
Phone. The calls can:ie from both coasts
After leaving the service, Loftus went
he killed 5,000 Jews/' Loftus said.
from friends, from the media and fEo~
to Suffolk Upivei:sity, '\vhere he earned a
Many of the alleged war criminals
the. ~roducer <>f "60 Minutes.;, A group
law degree· an:d a· master's degree in
settled in -Byelorussian enclaves in 14
of fnElnds gathered ~tind a television
p1.1blic admin1stration. He accepte,9, a
. cities in qie United States and Canada
set in his living room and toasted him
position in the. Justic¢' Department as
iit<:luding SPringfield, Mass.
'
with .champagne after the 11 o;clock
part of the attorney genetal's honors
·. _Many· Byelorussians collaborated
news... · · ·
··
, .
program, and-iri 19'ij! he moved froni the
, wtth _the Nazis in hopes of winning their
"I'll enjoy this for a few days, but I'm ,__ criminal division to the Office of Special
fr~ot:µ from Soviet rule, Loftus said;
-v~ gfad that it's coming to an end,'' he - Investigation.
_ The. Soviet Union lost 20 million
·
said.· upart of rile hopes the st,ory goes
When he left the Justice Department
~ople in World War U," Loftus said.
on, but I'd just as soon stay in· .the
last year, Loftus moved to Rockland
!hey let the butchers of their own
background. I think Congress is going to
because he was - attracted - by the
citizens go free so a handful of Soviet (i'. _ _
agents could exploit them. That's I ·
,barbarism."
: ~rom 1979 until fast May, Loftus was
;as~-..~J,ll§!i~ ~p;trtmenfs
Office of Special Investigations ..For two
Years_ he ·researched the entry of
·suspected war criminals into the United
States.
He took last summer off to write a
~k about the material he uncovered. It
·- - I
,
,
will be .- published in September by
. Alfred A. Knopf of New York under the , title, "The Belarus Secret."
,While ~Byeforussia was under Nazi
' control; one-fourth of the population was
'~-William <J. Tierney of Milton,.,. contributions from Ma
By Charles Kenney
~xt~~ated.. Some 750,000 Jews pernominated for a judgeship in the was one of his most a1
Globe Staff
. is~ed, mcluding _
some bab~es buried
Boston Municipal Court:
p~ign supporters' in the ]
alive to save ammunition. Their killers
Gov. Edward J. King yesterday
primary election King
decided that infants would be unable to
· nominated four persons as judges,
'• ~fa~y B. ~use of Brookline,
crawl out of the mass graves they were
three of them to fill judgeships cre- • nominated for a position at the Suf- , chael S. Dukakis, and fr
dumped in,
ated two days ago when he signed
folk.· County Probate and Family husband, Robert Muse'.
': The four nominee!
legislation, which he had proposed,
_ Loftus was born five years after the
Court;,
' horn· would be ·paid(
creating 14 new judicial positions,
, war.ended. When he started to dig into
e Jud e James J. Nixon of ~1- ; ar, were approved by
The four individuals nomlhated
. ~e records of various federal agencies,
mont, who is currently a distric;~
" 's Judicial Nominatir
, he kJ}ew virtually nothing about his
by the governor yesterday were:_
court judge in Cambridge and wa~ t, which screens peop
._assigne<l subject. ·
.
·
• New Bedford Mayor John A.
nominated to a position on- the f~ judgeshiPS\,. All th1
'' . tl'ha~ never heard of Byelorussia,''
Markey. who was nominated as
state_ Superior Court.
ri nts must be -apprQ,
1'e~ ~d. "I had hardly ever heard of
justice of the New Bedford District
ate Executive Council,
'; World War tt or the Holocaust. I was
Court:
1.! All but- Markey were
l)retty shocked by what I found."
fijr positions created by
- :r..ortus said he wrote the book as a
'cen'uy enacted bill estal
.warning: "There will be another
aactittonaf positions for
H~locaust If we're going to keep our
·: J
the state.
' ;
, - children safe, we have to know the
.· mistakes of the past and teach them to
1i:h;~~~~::ic~::~,
- the next.generation."
through the Legislature
CSS interviewer Mike Wallace never
'ed· $500 t o K· g' ~ campaign 1ast- . er.·.ies from ·Republican ,
- ·
. · , ,1 ·
·
m
,
. ffere are biographical sketcha
1
·

-~----------'
es of the four ·tndividuals nomi- April. . ,
nated as judges yesterd'a,y by
William J. Tierney;
Gov. Eaward:J. King:
. .
. Tierney, 49, of Milton, is cur... _
...
....
to

peo.

Af.-

-

King nominate.s·four·to fill

· - .., d .
f
SI{.et Ches O., ·1·a'Y'7ers, JUge

,_nominated. by· g·.ov.ern~r _

Q~~1::~\~i~~g~~~~it!t!};

_ .....__ __

r

.....oT"\i=-lu re-~,:.,,or<".ll nnnnool tn tho

nhiAf

mf~isfdra ~ew clays, butl'm ~ crimi~al ~vision to the Office of Special
[W~t:1t's coming to an end;" he
Investigation.
. \
:
);t'io(riie hopes the story goes
When he left the Justice Department·
:'d just as soon stay in· the
last year, Loftus moved to Rockland
I'd. I think Congress is going to
because he · was · attracted - by the ,

. J'. '

J!_ -~ .·
}

I

·--1

IGng ·nominate.s ·four•. to fill ;judgesh'.i:pS
'

-



'





'

I

f

-



• -Wi.lliam J. Tietneyof Milton,, contributions from Mafkey, who'
By Charles Kenney
nominated for- a judgeship in the "fas one bf his
~r-dent camGlobe Staff
Boston Municipal Court;
palgn supporters in th~ DemocraUc
Gov. Edward J. King yesterday
• Mah B. Muse of. Brookline, primary election Kin~ l,~st to Mi:
-nominated four persons as judges,
three of them to rm judgeships cre- • nominated for a'position M the Sut'- . chael S. Dukakis,and from Muse's
folk. County Probate and Family husband, Robert Muse! -~
ated two days ago wheri he signed
Court;,
·: The four fromlne~s', each of
legislation, which he had proposed,
'horn would .be, 'paid; $52,f>PO a
creating 14 new judicial positions,
• Jud e James J. Nixon of ~l, ar, were approved by Jhe gover
The four individuals nominated
tnont .. who is currently a distric.J n ·s J u. icfa1.NI
·
d · 'ominatjrtg commit
· •·
· ·
by the governor yesterday wen.~:
court judge in Cambridge and wa~ f which scr¢ens people applying
• New Bedford Mayor John A.
nominated to a posiUon on- the fq judgeship~., All t~e;·appointMarkey. who was nominated as
state Superior Court.
ri nts must be. ,apprqvecl by the
justice of the New Bedford District
ate Executive Counclt •
Court:
All but- Matkeywere 6omlnated
f. r positions .created QY ;King's ret nlly ena,cted bJll '"st~blishing I~
a ditional position~ fo,r ]4dges in
t e state.
·• ' ~/
·
That bill, which was, s1gned tnto
1 w Tue,sday, move;d_ rapidly
t rough the Legislature fn spite 6f
King·, campaign rast ~ ies from Republican ;14wmaker§
ffere are biographical sketch." . ed $500 to
es of the four 'individuals ,nQmi- April.
nated as judges yesterdh,jJ by
William J.Tierne:,
Gov. EawcirdJ. King:
· '
Tierney, 49, of Milton, is·curJ~bn A. Markey
rently general counsel to the chief
Ma,rkey.,,47; ha,s been mayor of administrative Justice ~f th'" sta~e
·.New B¢~ford since 197;2. Before i Trtal CourL:,iTierney formerly
that he ~as· in the private practice seryed as assi~tant clerk in both
- of law. •, .
. '
' - the Boston Municipal Court and
I · Markey was cdnsidered one of the Brookline Municipal Court.
King's most. ~ta]wa.rt supporters
Tierney is a graduate of Suffolk
during the Oemocratic primary. At University Law School and was a .
the: Uemo,::ratic caucuses last win- B on
ice officer for seven
ter, Michael s. Dukakls trounced
ears.
.
, Kirig in the comp<rtltion for dele- James J. Nixon
gates to the state party convention
Nixon, 55, of Belmont, was
1
but King defeated Dukakis in Ne
named as a Cambridge District
Bedford. Political observers ere - Court judge more than eight years
iled Markey with having organiz d ago by Gov: Francis W._Sargent.
From. November 1981 until
King's, victory in the delegation.
He contrib\1ted $100 to Kin s April 1982, Nixon served as chairmari of Governor King's task force
. campaign ]cj.st August.
Mary B. Muse
on violent juvenile crime.
A graduate of Suffolk University
Muse, a Brookline resident, ha
practiced law since 1952. She ha Law School in Boston, he is a former president of the Middlesex
practiced law with her husban
since 1965.
unty Bar Assn.
' A Boston natiye, Muse graduat- _ - - - - - - - - - - ed from Boston College Law Schooll

.mc(st

0
0

s1~etches of· lawyers, judge
·_nominated by· gov.ern9r -

I

and ..to.ok g·.rad·u·a\e. co.urses In ta. xati.o? at Boston University Law )
School. ,
·
..
,
"11usban!l, Ro~rt. contribut· ·



'that King w~~ cresiting "patron'age'
plums" for his supporters during. '
his lame duck period In office. The : :
Senate addeo.jfour judgeships to the •. ;
10 origina,Jly proposed by King,. . ...,
King had added an emergency.' '1
preamble to the bill to make it ef-' ·,.1
fective immediately. Without the .,
preamble, the bill would have tak- ·
·
en effect after tl\e)ame-duck governor left office in January, allowing
his successor to fill the positions.
John J. C., Herlihy, a Boston•
lawyer who is chairman of the Judicial Nominating Committee, said
yesterday that the addition of 14;
new judgeships In the state wiU not
require his panel to increase· the
number of proseective judges It ihterviews. Heflihy ,said the panel al-:
ready has aval}a,\ble a pool of about
100 lawyers Jf\~bnsiders. qualified
to become judges'.;•. ·

MTRIOt 1I1IGER
.QUINCY1 .Ml
ll, 1.¥11

BOSTON GI.OU

AUS 3 198'l

Q...,
--

BOSTOIJ. Ml,

New
England
cli)

'K ing-s-ize
'job_ for··
:.Dedham

'Student

By Ste;e Wagner
Patrl.otLedger Staff

,., · "My job is not to just promote the
govern9r, but to make 'people aware of
'what is going' on 1.n state govern, ment," said Jane Brennan, 22, of
·t)edham,a senior at Suffolk Universi'·ty.
.
.
~he is one of 11 college students
·working in Gov. Edward J. King's
"press office as interns this summer.
Brennan said she does hot get Piiid for
her work, but receives three credits
for working 12 hours a week. She also
works 17 to 25 hours a week as a
dietary aide at a Hyde Park nursing
home.
Included in Brennan's duties is
writing· press releases when the governor signs legislation or appoints
someone to an office. She attends J~ne Brennan of Dedham at her desk in Gov. Edward J. King's press office:
press <:onfeten~es, where she sets up a
yipe recorder and hands_· out _press time, two are volunteers and four c_oni._es in contact wi~h. "If we (one of \nse attorney Thomas Troy ·t
releases. Brennan said she has written work in the -office for college credit. the mte:ns) we.re ~omg ayress release titted by jury yesterday.
AP
·
·
··
·
,a response to a .newspaper editorial The full-timers are on a work-study on a bill a certam legislator spon- '
for the governor. · · ·
··
yesterday found
program, in which their school con- sored, we wo~ld call his office _and
. . "I love the. job, It's very e~citing, tributes 80 percent of their pay and make an appomtment to talk to h1m," · .· d
f " .
d , _·. ·
ar0 es o rape an · , as~
,especialllY on .deadline lirne," Bren- the presspffice 20 pe_rceitt. McMurray Brennan said..
Her opinion of the governor has ltients in a Waltham :Hi
nan, a journalism major, said. Work- said the paid interns receive $4 an
ing iµ tlie -press office ~lso helps. with hour.
changed sitice she' started _the job. "At ~V&--VV~~- trial. ,
.' ; ·
her career goals.<'Eventually, I would
firs~, I thought he was a httle co_nser-1y four -t.:, - · · · 1-.-..:-.. ,_ -:-~' · For radio- stations; Brennen said vattve. But when you see all the
n 0 ur~ 4t=10F~t;1
like to make itas aieporter." - . - .
S_he-said her.interest in writing goes she sometimes puti together an infor- legislation and the good it's done, I :
back to the sixtfi grade, when·.she won mational tape -that includes record- started to like him more and more," '
·
·
I
a $50 bond in-an essay contest. "It . ings of the governor from his press Brennan said.
Asked whether the interns are' re- I
(writirig)is -something I always want- -conference, '!The stations can call up
and tape the quotes right off the quet,ted to help in the governor's re- .
ed to do," she said:
·
·
,'
.
election campaign, Brennan said,
· Press officer Keith Westerman said ' rnachine;" she· explained.
the internship program 'has been, a ,; Brennan said she occasionally "It's not a campaign office, We deal
;
"tradition" with the governor's. office. meets with the governor. "At first, I with legislation and policy."
1
He said the press- office finds interns was nervous," she admitted, "but'you
,
"They (the interns) are excluded .
• • _ .- ·, · ·
·_,

.:_t_-_:i__
... through the coll(ges· and universities get t6 know him as a regular person. from political work. They're in the
He'll take time out to tal~ to an office to learn how to handle media
in t_he area.
. .
' :'.
and public information," Westerman 'bis work.
According-to press secr.etary Pam· intern."
T~onias pharles Troy;
MdM~ttay, five ·interns· work full
King is i1Q( the only politi~an she said.
in Boston on Feb. 2, 1931
----~,- · -- .~c ..
..
.. . . ·
-.
~~t fellow.· ~ttqn;1eys have come to . weeks after his father, a; aosi

Dr

ry

an,orllt(
if sa-.VVrY' , _,
'

'

'

'

wa

i~pect,, th11,t i:lSSi~tant tlistri~t, at. ,ttbrneys h_~ve .c6II1e tC> dread, and
:r.. •- • ....... - .· . . that defemtants in
PROfl~•, :, . ·trouble have come
'}JJN .TH• N•ws,. to. crave.
.
)t,
. -. The attorney,
: :l_'~who yesterday won . acquit~}. ro_r
,· ~f)r. Arif Hussa.i,n on charge~ of
· ;,1rape, attempted t,ape and' assault
·1~nd battery, J1asJjeen put down by
_
:~ipany ~)(cfo'w.n,· as a· burr urider _
:1~'1e sadqle'.~!,N~ges. and as an ac~~~n~!"Het~~.;~~~~!~!" ~.._,!°!~ ~i!!!! !.~t !!!

!~:

>

liceman was shot· and· kiiied
line of duty. He grew up ifih~
ter where he' had lits la;~Af1

many years:·

.: · ::~.:;; ·

·He now lives'in Readt~g:a
law office, the flnn, of TrQ'yJ •.
son, Reilly and '.foIQ.asiap,; l
LongfeUo~ place. ~ : (. ·_
: ,Before he tooJi up;the, !prac
iaw.-in.'1967, he had:worked
assistant to clinical ps)t~bo
in the Catholic Boys Guidaru
t~. ~ter 11.e. became ari .Ml
...
.

BOSTON Gl.081
BOSTON.ML

o.••,
1

/ ~: .eded lO votes yeste~ , y

lg

MAY t 31982

• 'how'local le~sfator$ voted on
-S:f"sterday:
. '
Atrd.Kirby, _ R-Whitman; Rei:is .
Weymouth;: Andrew Carq, Rh Cochran, R-Dedham; Jo·
.. ·
-Milton; El~zabeth Me~yer, _
.hael Mornssey, D-Qumcy;
morth Attleboro; Greg Sulli-.

..for· :
· ..
dh.a
·
..·· -n't.· ·;.
de
.

Buckley, D-Brockton; Paul.
Arthur Lewis, D-Boston;
D-Weymouth; Joseph Ti•
, .. .
. . Joseph Walsh, D 0 Boston;
. St ;e Wagner 'rownell, D-Quincy; Robert,
trio!Ledger Staff :y; John Flqod, D-Canton;
. _
. ·. ·
,Hanover; Peter ·Forman, R-;
1s not to JUSt prolllrohnston D-Marshfield· Wili~t t~ ma~e peopJe a~haron; 'CharlJs Man~, , R~mg on m sta e - lanette Mu1:ray R-Cohasset·
i_d ~ane Brennan, I, D-Walpole. ' ·
'
senior at Suffolk Ur
.
·

h

.•

me of 11 college s
Go!· Edward. J-l
e as mterns this f ,
a1dshed~esnotgetep·· te' m b e r
,
Pc.- C,
but receives three
.
3
g 12 hours a week. 1

to 25 hours a we,oston Globe photoengraver, !

le at a Hyde park ;ked as a random target as he. SCOTCHGUARD
at 2 a.m. He was left paralyzed ZIPPER fabric at:
I in Brennan's cl.wn after being hit by a bullet
~ss releases when tbed rifle.
. legislation or i trial, which lasted two and a
OPEN
DAILY
to an office. She in a mistrial when the jury
9:00
etences,.where sl)e opelessly deadlocked after 12
TO
rder and hands · o:ons.
5:30
:rennan said she ha,.ct Attorney Louis F. Sabadini
INCWDIN(
e to a newspaper . He said Wilson should have
SAT.
~ernor. - .11 because there have been no
the job. It's very in the case.
on'·,deadline tiill~lhe retrial delayed until Octo- ' - - - - - 1rnalisin major, sa,.iistponed it until Sept. 7.
press offi~e ~!so h -. .
..
. .
: goals. «Ev_entuall
ike.it as a reporter.
a
her:foterest in wr.
ie sixth grade, whe
:id in- an essay co
is'something lalw
she said;
··
ffi<ier Keith Wel;'>t
nship program .h
1''. with the governc
lie press office fiilc
he ·colleges and ur,
a.·,
ing·to press secre•
y~ five irtterns · '

S 00ttfig



LI PC•

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.t~:·

· . Arif Hussain (right) and def~nse a:tto~ey ·Thomas TrQY: ·tai~
.i.w~port,ers after H ~ was acqlrlttedby Jury res~~r~y.
PHQTO

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A Middlesex County Jury yesterday found pr. :Arif ' ·
ir!!.s.s~irt. innocent of charges ~f rape and .~~~~t1!t:· :
-lijrotight-by-two_ women patients 1n a Walthaqi ;H~sp1·-. ital, bringi~g to a close a five,,-w~k_ ~rial.
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The jury..deliberated only four hours be{or~ ·: ,

~ng its verdict.
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lrom Troy an, oriitop/

.~·tstreet samy:, ·

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.fay Paui
gner
hi~ work.
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taiobe staff
·
T~omas ~harles Troy.was ~l'.11"
- ""''
in Boston on Feb. 2, . ~l:130, /~9,,'
Te>m, Troy Js ,a nom de guerre · weeks after his father, ~q~9stp:n 1~01( ,
.•tbat fell9~ a,ttqq1eys ha~e come to · uceman was shot and kille~hrfthe, .·
·~pect•. that ~~i~!ant tlistrift at- line of duty. He grew up 1~D9re~~~. · .
. l.tt:>rneys have _come to dread,. and ter where he had his Ia.Vlr~~ffict-fof ..
.•,. . • . . ,.. , . .. that defen~ants in many yean;;
.. '·" · , !iX ; · . } : '
trouble have come
He iiowUves'in Read!~g:anc:fh~
law office, the. finn of TrQ'yi ,!l-p.er~.
-~tN .TH• NEWS, to crave1
·~'. .
Th~ attorney, son, Reilly and To~sirip, ili;,_atl·
:la'ho yesterday won acquitbil .for Longfellow; place. ·
r;. : ·: : ../ ·: ,
: ~r. Arif Hussa,tn on chargt;~ of
,Before he toolnip;t~~ prac,tic~gf.
· ::r:rape, attempted l'Jlpe ap.d ass~ult
in.1967, he ha&wotltedXas;ap. , ·
8
·1··~_-.n~.ba:~t~ry.·.:.-~!_..:~n. put. down by. assistant to•. cl1nieal -~-~.;~.".h_~19i_. _ . '.ts····'.; ,_'.
.. _·1e
_. J!lany ~. a fro~t1, as a burr undei: - in the Catholic Boys Gu.idall(!e ee~, -·
•the sad~le ~~j11cl~es. and as an ac-' - t,er. Later ~e._beca~e a~'.:MJ:?C po:' ...
J~qmplished actor who will try to Iiceman and then a private' d~tec,~
,~way a jµ~ ~!t11i: his ample gtft for · tive · before going to <5J1ffoll{___}aw
-£blarney., ·· _'\ . ,:
.
: School" - ·
f ,.
> ,, · ·-. -_.. . .
'li!:r_:..~He is1notaclown.
' Whatever else that backa;rotind"

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HP ill. ~ hlllrnurnrlcin<I' <>ttn-rn...,

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uvoe :ue1ore gomg to ¢,uffolk kaw ·•. •
":'Scli'ool.'."'.. ·.
'·f<, ;,}:'.'~::,., ..• /'
&;.;:.~He,is,not clown.
.,
>Whatever else t.hat background'
::- H~ ts a J1ardworking atton,iey may have done for h,itp, .tt :haE> giy- .
: ...who places a, l}igh value on. re-, ..
him :the one thing la.w school·.
{~~a1:.<:~•, pr~_pllr~U~n
tei:tm= __;,.does _noLteach., '.'.".cSqeet~Y.V¥"~¥-1? ·
\,-work,·a gifted 6tator who wilr"de" first-name familiarity with c:op5-;_ i
;Tfight 1h ~ ·phrase and work it until robqers, Judges. and di~trict at-tot- '\ :
·;;fU! pol~J:i~}ike a pebblo in the neys.
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"'¥<$.;,, ~amtner with>the te-,_
Troy likes to b6ast that., .I'.·
.,.na.clff pfit~mer, a shrewd Judge of haven't lost .a case in M;Idcilesex
:ffe~i~ Jlp.!i,;:a:g, ~dvocate who wilJ.. County ip the past five or. si_x
. :~te.ii,:yeJ1i~'cli~~t wfth the. conviction years." His. detrac~ots, and' the17'
;tbanvinor IQSe;·,Jt did not happen_ .are some, allege that tt. has been
· until after the big fight. He is, with- · "five or six years" for the past 19 ,
~,1; a deeply ~rn.:~t ~an who loves, years: ·. . ·.,· · . •. .·. ,· · , \ ·,
·
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. · Atthis point in hi!il life, the v~ry , ,
(act that Troy has Ut,keh on a ~~
~
·is news; 'It was•so l~t NovenJber.·
after Hussain .had been indicted ptL
· ··
· •· "· '·
· ·
charg~. that he raped one \Voill~P(
.trt her hospital bed ill Walthap:i_;·
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• · ·. · ; '
Hospital tn·March·of 191~ and th~f:,
_,cuucy.

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":' ::· women.s ,,
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\ j .··testunony·

,· ::i~ec,I weal{
1

?:f,::By Mary¢µen Reporter Kennedy
~-- : Contribllting


·1:,

· _' "Th~ rlicts'spoke, arid we
!:- listened;'.' said Roger Des~ · ;·: rocheri ,Jr;, ~ · Juror iri the
:,· : ,.. Hussain .trial; while walkirig
"' ,. 'into tfre R~mada Inn-Wor ·-:- burri .. where the seven· men
ii'~- and nine women on the Jury
;i' i 'have stay~ for the past five
.; •. weeks. "I f~l good about tqe
.f> ~::ctecision,'' he said.
.
'.: ·:
"Th'ere was no one factor
·: ·~ that influenced our decision.
; ·.: We just tQC>k :everything into
- :: ·consideration, and decided he
~: ., was innocerit/ said foreman
f •· ·
·
·.
,, ',-;.o·Jenn ·c.' . right a t a press
1. ~-:; conference, , .
"".: ·· · ;"7r1ght appeared stunned
¢ '. when 'a, reporter asked
i : whether' fie was aware t~at
..
~ (.Hussain had been convicted
' · ,-0f~peJii$t\Jurte.
·· ·
1
.., ·:::.. { 1was in Florida. I had no
~' =:id~." saiii;Wpght. hisvciice
•. · 'tra)Hng oJ(i.:,''That would
,, : ha've maae:.a. difference if I
;::; -kne'w he was convicted rap.' ;: tse 1 · ; , '.
.. ·. Some:>Jurors, seated
;;, ·~.around. :Wright on various
; \'..couches an.d ·chairs, yelled
, · '!Tllat's history" and "That's
: : ,not,9ur"l:iustpess."
· ·
· "'~· ''lt was Just like putting a
~;·puzzle together," Thomai. H.
:1 :; Cryan, 35, of Westford said.
:: '~, "We looked at all the evi:~ :' dence and came to the only
conclusion we could.'' .
.:-: : !· The jurors used only one
blballqt qn _each charge and
~a~q~ vote .• .was una11imous,
;., <§aid:•Cry~n;_ who cal.led the
: 1,.}urf '.'a. ~ni~ied group" who
Z -··•never a;r.gµed, just dis:t·cussed.''. -·· • ·
·
fylany <>(the Jurors called
-; ;~the testimony· of the two al: >1eged vic:tiJI1s O'weak," and ~ · Baibara 'Lancelotta. of Wo,.,; ·burn. said.the facts ·proved
:, l5 ·~those :'.wo'.frien Wereh 't

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.~J:!t::J:~:.~~~niriit~'
year.
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· LasL,June 9 Hussain had b.e¢n
·convicted, · along with two other·
c:loctors, of raping a ntirse and his··
attorney in that tria,},, Kenn~th
Goldberg. said he \Vas busy with
the appeal and after ta.,lldng it over .
with the doctor. approach~ Troy:
Troy. asked if it was mopey that· 1
motivated him to taktHhatcase on;
- winked and said, "What:il\l money?·
Who is going to talk about money
when justice ts.at stake.'.' . .· ......,.
. His reputatiqn pre.cede~ -}:utp.:, ·
. into tlie Middlesex Superior Gourt:
room a,nd judge and prosecutor '
alike girded for what .som,e 'Yould.
call, and what Juqge Andrew ,G.
M.e.yer did ca.n... '.'o.utrageous_. con~.
duct."
··
Thi~ .is what the judge m~~nt:
working himself up to a finelather
at· dne ..point during _pr~triaLmo~,
tions, Troy shouted, "I wi:lnt.you, _to
censure this young man (Asst ..
· Dist. Atty. William Kettlewell): He
has•been sneaking around by the
. light 0 ( ~ five,watt bulb, into a
. room with 23 people where hearsay, inn11endo and charaiter ,as- :
sassinatiori are the order of. the .•
day." . .
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No one unfamiliar with.the law ..
could have guessed that he . was
talkirig about the grand Jury. ·
Beca,1./,se someorie may get the
best of him, that does not mea11
that Tom Troy won't turn that to.•
his advantage. A nurse testifyh:ig
at this·· trial had gotten under pis
skin. Her name was Kat,hleen Mill~ i
. doon Bourke, and she gave a~ goo~
as sh¢ got on the witness stand.
·~Don't you fight witl:i. !De, you~~
. lady," Troy shouted a..t one point,I ,
am not figh,ting with yoµ, ~r. •
Troy, O,she replied icily. · .
· '
. That was one for her, but ah,
she was to serve her t1,1rn iJ1. ToJll:
Troy·~ qesign. WJ}eil in hi$ fillal ar. _gument he re,:I1in<ledJJ;iejury_9:f her_.
testimony, he pauSf!d just for. th~,
right number, of bea..rt beat~. _;:1gd
.pronouqced her n;:im~. lov1.n~Iy: •
"Kathleen Muldoon Bo:u.rke. A true
damfuter of ·Erin~"
1

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fattie,,e:'*ff•d·· FarniQJietti

>:.:
:i=/· 1,;
•inisconc~ption( ot wl}.at' :r~llY Ma.y ,. of,J~~J.:M~~lh4<>w' was holidays where all the families ing ·him on. T
happens .in the courtroQ:qi/~ pe ·injicte.41.ll''ai~'Eift>f l~81. I.sles 11te and played together. That day that the C(
•saidO -•·• •.
· . •. · . . · . . sai,d ·sµe~ _·· , · ght ·• vonBulow .extended :(amily has been hi~· 'of the famigli
.Vittorio "Re
· 'VllriBulowsat throughi>utthe ,· ·'•'wo.uld never 1ndic~, th~t it support throughout life. Ma~y
• tna.I;his bade braced· a~l:linst. was· all a~i k.·of •nonsense. of his aunts, uncles; cousips, is. a bricklayei
'the'back of the chair; tight-· Famigliettf''_ Mfier; ''Do you and his parents werein,the cour(Contlnuec
lipped, motionless, looking like still think itjs ·a, pack of non- troom at different times chee~a. store-front mannequin. Fami- sense." Her ;r~ly. ~as, "I don't
glietti said von~ulow did not know." That took' hini comtake the stand but. used it as a pletely by a\Irpris~.-It was ,a
.:.device.< "I think h'e'refused
replythat'wo:rkedinfavorofthe
take the stand because he didn't state's Cl:l,Se.f..
·. ,
want theJuey'tg1Im6i Hiui,,that
Dr. G«:iorg~. Fi Cahill, Jr.,,
.. if ·they did.,:they w.0,uld h,e con· director ofr~earch_forthe How::·
· vi.need that lie was capable of axd Hughes. Medical'Institute
'doing. it.· He.thinks he is above in Boston, .gaveco*fosive evi'Editor's Note:
the ordinazy citizen - that dence that :Marj;ha vonBulow's
would all -have worked to his coma
i:au:sed .by .insulin
The following is the second detriment,"fhe said.
'
injections J~hich•_:~was -~very-- -----installment of a two-part story
Orie oI
.. pn Stephen R, Famiglietti. · . :witnesses the most important important t§_ the case in Famicalled by th~ state. giietti's opi:fion.; ,. _.
·.
· -. Hereflecteion themediacov- · was vonBulow' s mistress, Alex-· ·. Famiglirm· grew up iri Provierage in the courtroom, camera, a.ndra Isles ..Famiglietti reniem- deuce's no.' h,:end to a working
men, tech:nici1;1ns and ~camera bered how . Fahl'inger · a-_nd · · class fa·_'• fyt t!J,l:i.'t: .believed
equipment; tllat eyed him, von- Sheelian did n9t want 'him to strongly in: W!'.>tlq:~g· for whaBulow, 'and everyone connected cross-examine her· before she tever you g~'i:1;rthis WO!'ld. And
with the case.. '._'I thin'k generally torik the sfand.
.- 'as is the c~{s~ in niost It~lian
that it is a good thing to have
As luck would have it; he met families, ~ere ,wa.s . a strong
cameras in the courtroom. It her before she took the stand family '.µnffy thaf extended
induces a better judidal system, and got a fe~l\ng for her as a b~yond hisJll:l.mediitte'family to
· where all parties are aware. Jt · person. Whe.n she . took the hi,$ grimdmpther; whom he sajd
keeps people on their toes. Most stand/Famiglietti established,· was the ceptralforce, the one
' people see courtroom scenes on . that she. and vonBulow had person thatj provided a gather' ' ' levis,iort series .:an_d th.at is a stopped seeing each other in fog placeejr,Y Sund~y and_all
Mr. &.Mrs. Vittorio Famiglietti.

to

was

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fi

tf
tihies· when I have gotten away
from those values, but I invaria~ly go hack. They were
[mpacted on my psyche. I still
~ave a very strong sense of
rv~at is right and wrong and
,air," he said.
·
·
•. ~tephen's values held ~ut in a
'Ieighborhopd with a mixture of
J.Ood and bad.
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paid off. ·'
He ~d odd jobs, such as being
a shoe salesman, a researcher
for the ~tate Str~t Bank, ~here
he, worked from 4 p.m. until 12
p.m., a construction worker and
a caterer on a truck driving to
factories selling food during the
employees' breaks. . Probably
the most strenuous in terms of

wou like to ta~e the job. I
t~ought I would h!l getting expenence. I started ~rosecuting in
January of 1975•. I had six
m?nth~ of it an1' loved every
mmut~ of it. N4w I'm much
m~m~ directed. I'v~·proven so:qie~ .
thing to myself.,\ I enjQy my
work. I ~tarted getting paid for
· what I hke to do. :I'm a workaholic," he said; _;

STANDARll·TIM.ES
NEW BmmRDaU
D. 50,100

MAY 171982

New
~d
Newsdip


,,-JO$tori lawyer who uncovered Nazi operation
BOSTON (AP) - A· former
government lawyer who . says the
µ.s. government recruited Nazi war
criminals to help spy on the Soviets
says he knew vir.tually nothing about·
the history of World War II bef<>re
joining the Justice Department.· · ·
. Jo~n Loftus, riow in private prac.
tice m. Boston; je>ined the Justice
Department's newly formed Office
of Special Investigation in May 1979.

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:···;John

L)ft~~. ·

:RelievedJ*t,":!~',,•,

,:.:....

_

He said, the Justice Department
was .looking . for lawyers with a
background in 'language and
intelligence.
''They wanted people, 'trial at·
torneys, to br,ing civil ~uits against
alleged ~azi :war crµriirufls,,' in the·
U.S.,". ,Lof.~~
,Wght;~
0 ~~~¥%;1

.,~~q,

after CBS's "Sixty Minutes" aired
Ins allegations.
· '
Loftus said be planned to work for
the special investigation office for
nine months, but got caught up in
the enormity of Nazi war crimes
and stayed two years.
·., He said he followed a trail through
vaults .of Army intelligence
d~uments to a cemetery in South
Ri_ve~, N:J., where reputed Nazi war
~urunals . are buried. Loftus said
tj:tose war criminals entered the
Nnited States with the help of U.S.
government officials.
1

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"I'm ~nd.~f reljeveq ·it'.s over,"
~ftus s~d .. I~ ~as a. yery stressful
,,~d -~gly part 9t illy life. I'm glad
5 If 9i:11~~r ,~ffl\1'1;9Ut. jt, 'YAA cl V!rt
i'

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. ., .,~ t: ' . .if;j

' ·-.,. ;.- t~:


IS

hard and time-consuming _
effort to
get to the bottom of this."
Loftus was born in Boston 32 years
ago.
He attended Bosto'n Latin School
.~nd graduated from Boston College
m 1971.
H~ the!} served three years as an
army officer, returning to Boston in
1974.
·
He earned joint degrees in law and
public administration from Suffolk
University in 1977 and went to"work
for the Justice Department in the
criminal division that year.

He

ha~ written a book about his
work in special investiga~ons, "the
Be1arus Secret," scheduled for
ifelease this. fall
, . . ·_., ·.:? ·.:,·~:·>:";Y/

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'"t~-~~··· FamiQljetti·?.'
r~Uy

'iVQ11)3u:low:· was holidays where all the families
'~tdf 1981: Isles ~te and. played together. That,
. sa\d ·sli~-/ . gli! vonBulow extended family has been his
rhoutthe . ·'·would
Indicted, th.at it support tnroughout life. Man.y.
against :, was all a';;;~g}i;.;bf ngnsense. of his aunts, uncles, cousips,
ir; tight- FamigliettVii~edher; "Do you andhis_parentswer.einthecour,king like still think i( •JS ,a pack of non- troom at different times cheerin. Fami- sense." Heriei)ly was, "I don't
did not know." That·tdok· hirti comid it as a pletely by ~ris~g. It was a
!fused' to replythat'wt>txedinfavorofthe
he didn't state's case,I •. · . - ·
ii:in,:ihat
Dr. Georji,. F. Cahill, Jr.,..
l
con: director <;>tr~~a:#h, for the How:tpable of .axd Hughes\Mediciil 'Institute
is a'bove in Boston, .~a:ve"condµsiv~ evi- that dence that jarthavon.Bu~ow',s
id to his coma was ~used <bY :insulin
inj_e(:tigns ~hicii•,--wa~-very---~-/
nportant _important -~Jhe case in Fami.he s_tate gliettrs,opiiion.. · .
iss, Alex-. ..· Famigiiei,i grew up iii Provi-

1t

:,oJri,'' pe

never:; .

ing him on. There was never a
day that the courtroom was free .
of the Famiglietti family.
· Vittorio ~·Rocco" Famiglietti
is a bricklayer and his mother,
·
.fi...... ,'
.-.
<<;onllnued o~8)
~

be

~:rem;:d
Lt him to
fore she
• -·
t;fie met
1e stand
her. as a
ook the
ablished '
low had
other in,

!t:~:·s

,:it/n~~\:rr!:~
Strongly irif~ Wi):f}q1).g:for Whac
tever you g~itr-thi's ~~rtd. And
as is the case in;mosfltalian
families, tliere was, a . strong
family ,unify thaf extended
beyond his.i'mm.ediate1family to
h:i,s grandrtiilthJr; ;Vl"hom he sajd
was the cehtral ·. force, lhe one
person tha( provided a gathering place elry Sunday and_all

ne wuum itte
ng
ter
,re
12
1d
to
1e
ly
)f

lo

iaJ:, ihe Job. t -

Mr. &_Mrs. Vittorio Famiglietti.

t~ought I would b~ getting expenence. I started ~rosecuting in
January of 197&. I had six
m?_ nth!! of. !t anf:._ Iove d_ every
__
minute of 1t. Nq~ I'm: much
mor~ directed. I'vti'pr:oven something to .myself1~, I enjoy my
work.• I started ge,lting paid for
,what I like to do.;I'm a workaholic,,,he said. ,:

STANDARll-TW
NEW BmmRDa Im
D. 50,100

New
England
. . _____ _ Newsdip

MAY 17 \982

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uncovered Nazi- operation is 'glad it,'s coming ouit'
.
.

- A former
~ho . says the
ited Nazi war
,n the Soviets
nothing about ·
Var II before
partment. · ·
private prac~
I the Justice
>rmed Office
1in May 1979.

Department
rers with a
guage and
le, · trial at-.
~uits against
1in~ls.]i;i the
q\~,,*:;);~,!ght~

hard and time-consuming effort to
after CBS's "Sixty Minutes" aired
get to the bottom of this."
his allegations.
LQftus was born in Boston 32 years
Loftus said Ile planned to worJt for
ago.
the special investigation office for
He attended Boston Latin School
nine months, but got caught up in .
the enormity of Nazi war ·crimes
~nd graduated from Boston College
m 1971.
and stayed two years.
· He then served three years as an
-. He said he followed a trail through
army officer, returning to Boston in
vaults .of Army intelligence
1974.
documents to a cemetery in South
River, N:J., wherereputedNaziwar
He earned joint degrees in law and
¢rlminals ~re buried. Loftus .said
public administration from Suffolk
tJiose wai' criminals entered the
University in 1977 and went lo'work
United States with the help of U.S.
for the Justice Department in the
government officials.
··
criminal division that year.
1

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j"I'm kind of relieved it'.s over,"
toftus-said. ' 1.t. was a very stressful
W!d ~gly' part ~f my·life. __ I'm glad

. /f s/1~~

'.~~,Pfout. {t '~:.'' ".~r~

He has written a book about his
w<>rk in special investigatjons, "the ,
I3elarus · Secret,'' scheduled for
lfel~~-"~'.

,i;J~~-'~; _·:

====~~---....------------'-'---'----'---''"
"'

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"There were good and ·bad timewru, w.orltliig ,from 4 in the·
kids -- some ended tip on the morning until 8 in the morning
· · · ··
·· · ·,
wrong 11ide of the law and some for UnitedParcel Service. After
(~ontin.ue(f!:~~1).
. ended'upintheseminary.Iwas · w<>rkhe\Yentstraighttoschool.
~ affected by both influences. I
"I wa.s alway~so manic, loo~-:, Angela,. is ·a retired factory got in some trouble, but I also ingbackonitndw.Ithinkitwas
·. seamstress who now works for hEd strong family roots,'' he ge>od for me to.·work so muclt;
the State'Department of Elderly said.
.
because when l' did work acaAffaits .. The family, that
At 12 and 13 years old, Ste· demically, i' had to be ·disciinciu.des an• older brother and phen worked iii the neighbor- plined. I knew I had to get the
young.er sister; lived in tene- • hood liquor store, carrying classwork done. I remember livments until Stephen ·was 15 cases of beer and wine. "We ing with two very wealthy guys
years .old. He started working used to gamble and drink at the when I. was in college. I use to
for his father carrying bricks store," he said.
· ·
wonder why I had to be born
when he was eight years old,
The Famiglietti family had a poor. I was a very angry person ·f
ahvays earning• whatever iStrong' sense. of pride. Rocco then," he said.
money he got. By the time he \Vas Famiglietti was very _good' at
Stephen wan~d tp be a doctor
15 .years old, the/ family had what he did (bricklayer) alw11ys when he was .a;kid but had a
bought a home and Stephen· getting up in the morning· 11u:1d, stronger leaning toward Engwas in high. school excelling in having a smile ort his face. Ste- lish than scienge g<;iurses and
class and an avid reader. Read-' phen remembered that he settled on law, graduating from
ing was almost a hobby with received a lot of 'positive rein~. .J;,nffolk UJliversity J;,t_aw.S~
Stephen. He started reading the
forcement from his father.
in 1972. He passed the bar exam
.Encyclopedia Britannia at five
Stephen's ~eep interest to· on the first try, ~t.that did not
;years of age; reading through learn all he could showed itself' open doors for him. He became a
every volume to Z.. He knew early in life when he started lawclerk:foraye~r,andajudge
early , in life while carrying reaiung the encyclopedia at . he worked for le.t him use his
bricks for his father that · he five. His interest never faltered. office to. take' 1lh,e cases more
wanted a different lifestyle To 11chieve his goa~s he knew.he ' established lawyers did not
when he grew up.
· had a long disciplined road want·to deal with, such as colRocco and Angela Fami- ahead of him.
lection work and~divorce cases.
glietti, being strong church
Coming from a working class Stephen thoughtJabor law was
goers, wanted 'to instill the family, Stephen had to work his field and haa a job:in the
churches values in their son. harder to achieve his goals. It works in Wasli,ington D.C.,
Stephen was an altar boy and meant he would have to wo.rk until a job freeze~put damper
remained close to the church, part-time while in · school and on his hopes.
.,
participating. in many of its full-time during summers off. It
An opening became available
social 'affairs. "I got my values meant he would havetotake out in the Attorniy General's
from my mother and father and student loans and grants, total- Office. "A friend~",asked me if I
the church. There- have been ing $12,000, that are still being would like to ta'ke the job. I
times when I have gotten away paid off.
thought! would begettingexpefronithose values, but.JJ.nvariaHe <¥d odd jobs, suc_h as being rience. I started ~rosecuti. g ~n
·n.
oly • go back. T ~ were a shoe salesman, a researcher January of 1975. I had six
impactecl .on my psyche. I still for the State Str~t Bank, ~here month~ of it antt loved every
b.ave a very strong sense of he worlted from 4 p.m. until 12 minute of it.
I'm much
what' is right and wrong and p.m., a construction worker and morf! directed. I'v~pr.oven sometair/' he said.
·
a caterer on a truck driving to thing to myself} I enjoy my
Stephen's values held out in a factories selling food during the work. I started getting paid for
ieighborhood with a mixture of employees'· breaks. · Probably . what I like to do.[I'm a workaJood and b~d.
·
the most strenuous in terms of holic," he said. .\

ECHU ECHO
PRQVIDEtlCE, RI.

w. 25;-000

New

JUN 10 198'l

EDgbui.
NeW&clir,

a

STANDARIHIMES
NEW BmmRD..tD
D. 50,100

N4w

rtJO$tOri

New

MAY 171982

~d

Newsdip


operation •
1s
lawyer WhO- uncOvered Nazi
BOSTON (AP) - A· former
government lawyer who . says the
U.S. government recruited Na:ti war
criminals to help spy on the Soviets
says he knew vir.tually nothing about·
the history of World War II befor~
joining the Justice Department.
John Loftus, riow in private prac~
tice in. I3oston; joined the. Justice
Department's newly formed Office
of Special Investigation in May 1979.

after CBS's "Sixty Minutes" aire.d
liis allegations.
Loftus said be planned to worJ{. for
the special investig~tion office f~r
nine months, l:>ut got caught up m .
the enormity of Nazi war crimes
and stayed two years.
He said he followed a trail through
v:aults .of Army intelligence
documents to a cemetery in South
River, N:J ., where reputed Nazi w~r
criminals are buried. Loftus said
those war criminals entered the
United States with the help of U.S.
government officials.

He said, the Justice Department
was looking •for lawyers with a
background in ·1anguage and
intelligencia.
· ..
; "I;m kind of reUeveg it's .over,"
..'They wanted ·people, · trial at~ftus said. "It:was a very stressful
torneys, to bring civil ~uit;s against
~d ugly' part 'Qf tily. life.
glad
alleged ~azi war ·crj.i:riin~~··t in the
.
. ;, Lof • · "d j;l An · . • ht
~':c!':l' U.S., . JP.~,:~~ ,,,;l/',~~*(t(ig ;, i il'~#ifWlr~i1'~9ut. }t.'Y~.~f, V~l'Y.,
.
. . ;·': #;: :· ~ .·. ,'~,.
.

rm

hard and time-consuming .effort to
get to the bottom of this."
Loftus was born in Boston 32 years
ago.
. .
He attended Boston Latin School
and graduated from Boston College

r·.

in 1971.

He then served three years as an
arrriy officer, returning to Boston in

1974.

.:

He earned joint degrees in law and
public admini,tration from Suffolk
Univers!ty in 1971 and went ui'work
for ffie Justice Department in the
criminal divi.sion that year.

He

has written a book about his
work iri specialinvestigaµons, "the
Belarus Secret,'' scheduled for
'4rele/;l~~. tiji~.J/;l!l,; ,;
J:.~
. ' -.
,'' ' .

,



..

.,

MTA TODAY
BOSTON, MA.
M. 63,00D

------

------

---- - - - ~ - - - - - - - - -

The Mustang News: Best in the busi1
Henry R. Selvitella sits back in
his cluttered office at Medford High
School and talks about the editorial
philosophy of The Mustang News.
''Anything in.the school system is
fair game for a story," he says. "If
venereal disease becomes a menace,
then we do a piece on VD."
He is talking about the high
school newspaper that has few
challengers for the title of best in
Massachusetts-perhaps best in the
nation. ·
· Beneath the News masthead is a
line that says simply, "Awarded
every major journalism award in the
United States." And that's no
kidding.
The News over its 20 years of
existence has won just about every
journalistic prize available to a high
school publication. Among the most
recent was the award received- last
fall from the New England
Scholastic Press Association, which
gave its highest achievement award
for editing and publis~ng to the
News-'-for the 19th con.tive
- year. And just last monl'li the News
was _named best liewspaper in an
awards program sp~>nsored by'
!'- __ Suffolk University a11<.l ~()n!!,u~t~".9.¥:__
the M-assaGhusetts--.lltess · · ':
AS,sociation..
·
1

We believe that research
'

.

.

,

is the basis for any-good
story ... ~e insist on .
reliability of our facts.'
Why the name Mustang News?
Because the school football team is
known as the Mustangs, flnd there
is a lot of student pride involved in
the name.
·
Selvitella, who teaches English at
Medford High, has been advisor to
the News since its inception: I:Ie
encourages the staff of the paper to
run it like a professionally done
newspaper-which means tmit the
News does not shy away from
~
controversy.
The News has explored subjects
such as VD and teenage suicide, and
has· had no protests from readers .
because, as Selvitella explains, ''We
require a professional base for our
ari-11!1,loa

H

Thaf- ffl.oa,.,c, oVi-O'l"lc,;,r,.o

cents a copy. 1\
are sold in Mee
eluding elemen
The paper ali
scholarship pro
awarded more t
journalism stuc
Selvitella has
in producing th
whom a dozen c
Taking Selvitell
is not a prerequ
the paper. "We
any kid in Medi
who has talent i
phy or art can b
says.
1

A staff of p,
selling the f'i
corridors fo
copy.'
Selvitella tells t
useless unless yot
deadline.''
Some News Sta
jobs in journalism
· Former News writ
now with the Bos
fire that destroyec
1965 led to a new~
student, Bob Stan
the fire was publis
and he ,later ,went 1
Associated Press s
Heflff R. $elvitella has been advisor Jo ft.1edford High School's Mustang News
photographer. He 1
since its inception 20 years ago.
:
·
_
Universal Pictures
.
came close to perishing last fall, due
photographer.
~he writing and photographic skills
to cuts in the school budget
It was more or 11:
of the sty.dentl3, we are getting
demanded under Proposition 2%.
that Selvitella drift
letters from parents, suggesting
advisor to the New
The school committee had to cut the
,articles .. Instead of a high school
budget so deeply that nearly 100
He had done a lot <
paper we 8!'.0 now becoming citys
wide."
-· · ·
· :
work, both freelanc
teachers lost their jobs. Many other
Force, and was edi1
buc:iget items also_ were cu,t, ui-:
, Advertising is s9ld on the basis of
yearbook at SuffoU
' eluding tlie entire budget of the
being a good investment, not a
· though he was a hii
News.
donation to tlie paper., Many merSelvitella became
Rathei: than walking away frolll
~hants buy full-page.and half~page.
the News Selvitella and the paper's
.teacher at Medford'
.~reads, beca.\lse the student, sa,les ·
school; and soon fm
staff decided to convert it into a
people help,1;hem lay out the ads so
'advisor to'the schoc
profit~making enterprise that
of his background. ]
doesn't depend on sc_hool funds. The
format from a mimE
entire cost of the last two issues has _Jl\dvertising' is soid on .
been paid from iilcome, .t\dy~r~ising
lllt,,~;i~-9J,_.being ,a good- - 't6 a pa'per that was
salespeople are scurryinjfaround -·-·
printed. The head oi
'Jnvestrnent:~ -not -a
English department
Medford now faster than ever
donation tp -the paper.'
and invited Selvitell
before, and it looks as though the
journalism there anc
News will survive.
Tl..;, 1\T,.,,,., alon l..ac, ;ninort fn1"rac,

MTA TCDAY

BOSTON, Ml\.
~, 63,080

The Mustang Nevvs: Best in the business
cents a copy. More than 1,000 copies
are sold in Medford schools, in.eluding elementary schools.
The paper also supports a
scholarship program that has
awarded more than $4,000 in aid to
journalism students in recent years.
Selvitella has 50 students involved
in producing the newspaper - of
whom a dozen do most of the work.
Taking Selvitella's journalism course
is not a prerequisite 'for working on
the paper. "We offer·staff roles to
any kid in Medford High. Anyone
who has talent in writing, photography or art can be published," he
says.

Henry R. Selvitella sits back in
his cluttered office at Med.ford High
School and talks about the editorial
philosophy of The Mustang News.
"Anything in the school system is
fair game for a story," he says. -" If
venereal disease becomes a menace,
then we do a piece on VD."
He is talking about the high
school newspaper that has few
challengers for the title of best in
Massachusetts-perhaps best in the
nation.
-Beneath the News masthead is a
line that says simply, "Awarded
every major journalism award in the
United States." And that's no
kidding.
The News over its 20 years of
existence has won just about every
journalistic prize available to a high
school publication. Among the most
recent was the award received· last
fall from the New England
Scholastic Press Association, which
gave its highest achievement award
for editing and publishing to the
News-for the 19th consecutive
year. And just last month the News
was _named best newspaper in an
awards program sponsored PY
., Suffolk University and conducted by
·the Massachusetts ,J\.ess.· ···Association.

'A staff of paid students is
selling the News in school
corridors for 25 cents a
copy.'

Selvitella tells the staff: "Talent is
useless unless you meet your
deadline."
Some News Staffers have taken
jobs in journalism after graduation.
Former News writer Bob Cosetti is
now with the Boston Herald. The··
fire that destroyed Medford High in '
1965 led to a news job for another
student, Bob Stanley. His picture of
the fire was published nation-wide,
'We believe that research
and he later ,went to work for the
is the basis for any good
Associated Press as a staff
Htmry_ R.: Selvitelfa has. been advisor to Medford High School's Mustang News
story ... We insist on _
photographer. He now is with
sin_ce its inception 20 years ago.
·
.
Universal Pictures as a still
reliability of our facts, I
came close _to perishing last fall, due
the ~ting and photographic skills
photographer.
to cuts in the school budget
bf the st1,1dents, we are getting
It was more or less by accident
Why the name Mustang News?
that Selvitella drifted into the job of
demanded under Proposition 2Y..
letters from parents, suggesting
Because the school football team is
advisor to the News 20 years ago.
The school committee had to cut the
iu:ticles. Instead of a high school
known as the Mustangs, and there
He had done a lot of journalistic
budget so deeply that nearly 100
paper we are now becoming cityis a lot of student pride involved in
wide."·
• · ·
·
teachers lost their jobs. Many either
work, both freelance and in t_he Air
the name.
Force, and was editor-in-chief of the
bucigetjtemsalso were cut, iµ:
Advertisingis sold on the basis of
Selvitella, who teaches English at · eluding the entire budget of the
yearbook at Suffolk University even
peing a good investment, not a
Medford High, has been advisor to
though he was a history major.
News.
donation to the paper.,Many merthe New_s since its inception. ~e
Selvitella became a history
Rather than walking away frolll
i;hants buy full-page and half:page.
encourages the_ staff of the paper to
teacher at Medford's junior higli
the News Selvitella and the paper's
11preads, because the student.sales
run it like a professionally done
school; and soon found himself
staff decided to convert it into a
people help,,them lay out the ads so
newspaper-which means that the
profit~making enterprisl:l that
·
advisor to'the school paper because
News does not shy away from
of his background. He cha11ged the
doesn't depend on school funds. The _. ,.!,A_ dverti_.S_ing' is soid'' on
_
controversy.
forniat_from a mimeographed sheet
entire cost of the last two issues has
The News has explored subjects
been paid from µicome. Adyertising
i:?!Jj_§.;,g.fJieing 8 gOod 'to paper that was typeset and
such as VD and teenage suicide, and
· printed. The head of the high school
salespeople are sciiriyfugaround .
investment,_ not a
has had no protests from readers
Medford now faster than ever
·
English department saw his work
because, as Selvitella explains, "We
before, and it looks as though the
~onation to ·the paper.,
and invited Selvitella to teach
require a professional base for our
News will survive.
"
journalism there and start a high
they look appealing. "We tell the
articles." That nieans extensive
The News also has joined forces
school paper.
advertisers that we reach 30,000 to
interviewing, extensive factwith the Medford Daily Mercury,
In 1964, Selvitella was chosen as
.checking, and close editing.
,0,000 people, and that th,e teenage
one of the top three journalism
which now caries the News as a
mark.et is the biggest there is," says
"The News_is not a glorified
supplement at no additional cost to
teachers in the nation. He taught
Selvitella.
bulletin board," Selvitella says
school Jmalism in a summer
Mercury readers. That means that
proudly.
,, Because the paper is now operated
each of the four issues published
program at the University of Rhode
strictly as a business, the News has
"We believe that research is the
annually by the News are seen by
Island. He turned down a staff job
basis for any good story.... We
sued some advertisers for nonmost of the city's residents, rather
on a Boston daily, although at one
.payment of their bills.
insist on reliability of our facts ....
than by high school students only.
time he was a freelance reporter for
Advertising salespeople are paid
The system works, too, because over
"Instead of being a dead horse, we
The Boston Globe.
commissions, with the money paid
the years we have never received one
are now alive and kicking," says
Why has he stayed as News
into a savings account for them so
negative letter, even from a parent,
Selvitella. "Our press run has gone
advisor for 20 years? He reflects a
that at the end of the school year
a politician or a medical person.
from 3,000 to 12,000, and we have
moment, then replies. ''The joy is
they can have $300 to $500 ac"Getting the facts straight is
bigger editions, too-24 to 30 pages,
the kids. Nothing turns me on like
. cumulated in their name.
fundamental, and we try to· make
so we can give more substance to a
when a kid wins the best story of
A staff of paid students is selling
that sink into our writers' minds."
the year award."
story.
the News in school corridors for 25
Despite its excellence the News
"Now that the community sees
-Russ Burbank

J:J:t!

a

--~- --·-

-- . ~-····

.<.....

(' l!J:s.i4_secretly smuggled Nazis into country
En~rvices.
.
th_at paranoid people make up and it really wasn't true,"
He ai!ded that he expected Congress to conduct an
WA_SHINGTON
The U.S
government, for Frank said
inv-estigation, which he said should result in .the
He_ said he became convinced that the allegations were declassification of the documents, in the d~portation of: tjle
intelligence purposes, recruited hundreds of Russians
believed to·have committed World War II atrocities and factually based afte,r· seeing documents, including one war criminals and in the d_isc!iarge of those involved in,the
srriugg].ed thein into the· United States after the war in involving Emmanuel 1Jasiuk, a Russian who, early in 1942, cover-up.
'
Loftus said th.e w_ ar_ c_r_iminals had b_een smuggled_jnto
defiance· _of presiaential orders, according to a former ~foar_sceas~pointed mayor of Stulpche by the Nazi occupation
Justice Department investigator .
'
, Jasiuk was one of two reputed Nazi war criminals a the country. despite specific orders agamst sue~ an event
The secret operation, the outgrowth of a sort of
We late,;
bidding war for intelligence that proved to be of little House committee asked tile General Accounting Office to from . Presidents Roose".elt and -'!'1:'lllan.
yalue, was' later systematically covered up by various investigate in 1978. T,he GAO reported publicly in May of ~sta~lish~d that the !iles pertammg to the Nazi
federal agencies, according to _
John Loftus, a former that year it had found lhat the intelligence agency had used immigration had been wi_thheld, from Congress, from_ the
court.s, fr?m the. CI~ and _from the_ local agents of--the
prosecutor for the Justice Department's office of special 21 alleged war criminals as "sources of information."
investigations. This unit was set up by President Carter to
Frank said Sunday that when the GAO had asked Immigratmn Service, he said
find and deport former war criminals living in the United Army intelligence about these cases, "The Army simply
Loftus specifically cited the State Department's Office
States
lied," and said it had no files on them
of Policy Coordination, a covert intelligence group ··that
Loftus, now a lawyer in private practice in Boston,
In an interview Sund_ay with The New York_ Times, predated the Central Intelligence Agency, as the main
was interv_iewed on the .CBS News program "60 Minutes," Frank complained of what ,he called _the _government's initiator of the program to brjng the Russians to the United
l;>roadcast Sunday evening.
· ·
"absolute, blatant immorality ...,. smuggling murderers into States He said the OPC was run by Frank Wisner, a
:
wartime intelligence operative
Many ..of. the , Russians, collaborators in the Nazi tliis country and subsequently lying about it "
advance into_ the Soviet Union, are still alive and Jiving in . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . . , . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ - - . . . ; - - ,
this_ country as _
American citizens, Loftus said Some of
them.work for such organizations as Radio Free Europe.,
The Nazi-collaborators were given jobs in the United
States and. some_ were later sent to the Soviet Uniori _in
·parachute teams- in an imsaccessftrl-.rttempt to pertoPm
By JOHN B-ENSON
cial investigation office for nine months, but got
assassinations arid start civil wars, ·Loftus said
'
Enlerprise Staff
caught up in the enormity of Nazi war crimes and
He said the State· Department's Office of Policy
stayed two years He left in.May 1981-when he felt his
ROCKLAND - John Loftus of Rockland says his
Coordination - '_'the first covert spy agency set up in the
work was no longer progressing, and contacted the
revelations about Nazi war criminals being given proUnited States," pre-,dating the CIA by several months TV network
tection by the US g9vernmerit is "only the tip_ of the
smuggled sever.al hundred Nazi collaborators into America
iceberg''
~
shortly after World War II "for intelligence purposes " :
"I'-m kind of relieved it's over " Loftus said "It
Loftus, 32, Of Spring Street, formerly a lawyer
I,,oftllis said the agents; who had joined the Nazis as
was a very stressful and ugly part of my life.· I'm
With the Justice Department's Office of Special investhey invaded the Soviet Union in world War II, told tlie
glad it's finally coming out It was a very hard ang _,
State Department's spy agency and military intelligence
tigati<ms, ,was featured Sunday night on CBS's "Sixty
time-consuming effort to get to the bottom of this "
··1
''.tl]<i_t,.they could provide the Americans with a secret army' Minutes-:'
Loftus' wife Susan, who helped edit the book, said
behind .the Iron Curtain. It was a tragic lie. Every one of
Loftus, a resident of
this morning that the discoveries her husband made
their operations-had been penetrated by the Soviets "
Rockland since August,
in the course of the probe proved a "real ordeal f9r·
and now witl) the BosMany of them, he ·said, were later identified as being
him.
double agents
_
,
ton Law firm Bingham,
"I don't think anyone would ever understandDaria & Gould, has ,
In a "conservative estimate," Loftus said 300 are still
what he went through," she said,
Jiving in tl;le United States._
_
_
written a book, "The
Belarus ·Secret" ex"We later established that- the files pertaining to the
"Not only did lie have to deal with the Holocaust,
pected to be out in Sepe
Nazi immigration had been withheld from Congress, from
which is horrifying enough, but the facts he turned up
the courts, from the CIA and from the local agents of the
tember
were.revolting·"
_
Immigration Service," Loftus told "60 Minutes "
He said he was
She said her husband worked nights and weelf
"We had one imit of the government out trying to
able to. get only about
ends and spare time for two years, and had nightprosecute the Nazis and -other units of the government
one-third of his informares.
trying to secret the information."
mation declassified and
,
"The pressure was incredible," she said
'Those particip1i!ting in the cover-up, he said, included
into print, although he's
Adding to the difficulty, she_ said, was the fact
the FBI ang the Army
·
convinced the remain'
that much of the information he· was working witb.',
der poses no threat' .to
Also appearing on the' program was Rep. Barney_
was classified and he could not let her know what was•:
national security.
Frank, D-Mass., who serves on a House immigration\
going·on.
"This is just the
In his search, Loftus followed a trail througl]
subcommittee. ·
JQH"! LOFTU~
tip of the iceberg;"
vaults of Army intelligence documents to a cemetery
ranll:. said that 'when he heard the allegations, he:
... brings story to light
He 11xpects much
in South River, N.J., where reputed Nazi war.crhninot believe them "I thought it was the kind of thing_
,
_
of ,it to be forthcoming
nals are buried.
~
through congr!lssional investigations and hearings
-Loftus said those war criminals entered the
--later this year
United States with the help of U S government offi"
Loftus said the U.S recruited some 300 Byeloruscials. ·sians, his special area of investigation, as well as sevHe attended Boston Latin School and graduated
eral other "ethnic groups," whom, he, declined to
from Bost_on College in 1971
THE ENTERPRISE
name, for spying on the Soviets after World War II.
He then served three years as an army officer,
The Rockland man spent from May 1979 to May
BROCKTON, .M~
returning to Boston in 1974.
_
1981 with the Justice Department's newly formed OfHe earned joint degrees in _law and public adminD 60,500
fice of Special Investigation which planned on 'bringistraUon from Suffolk University in 1'977 ·and went to
ing civil suits against alleged the criminals.
work for the Jusuce Department in the criminal diviNew
Loftus said he had planned_ to work for the spesion thaq,ear.
England

Loftus: Revelations tip of the iceberg

MAY

1 '1 1982

Newilclir,

V181982

New
Ellglaud

Newsclip

=

PROFILES

BACKGROUND OF
-.~SPEAKE~~

<

')5-F. LEE BAILEY

"example, h~ wrote, .. A person from Georgia, if he ever gets anywhere very far out
of Georgia, is forever saying or thinking,
"To Be a Trial L'awyer."
Sh re.
"Well yeah, I'm from Georgia, but. "
All the world's a stage celebrity trial
Blount is 41, married and, no buts
lawyer F. Lee Bailey, and nowhere so
much as in the courtroom Bailey is as about it, lives in Mill River, Mass,
famous for his theatrical sense as for his
legal acumen; he's a consummate actor HELEN GURLEY BROWN
who once fired a gun at a witness to prove "Having It All." Simon & Schuster.
a point. The gun was unloaded
Cosmopolitan editor Helen Gurley
And he's endlessly enterprising as Brown says her latest book is a how-to
well, an amateur aviator, president of the book for women she terms "mouseEnstrom Helicopter Corp , owner and di- burgers" - those who are not blessed
rector of Chris-Craft Boats, and author of with looks, brains, education, money or a
-: ,;:<;five books including a novel and a flying- classy family background. Like herself,
inanual
claims
Bailey, a Massachusetts native, went sheNow 60, Brown grew up In a poor famto Harvard and then transferred to Bos- ily in Arkansas Hers was a classic hard
ton University Law School - where he luck story. Her father died young Her
ran his own private investigative agency mother was an embittered widow Her
- and graduated in 1960 at the top of the sister developed polio. Brown endured all
class. The next year he was admitted to this plus the ravages of acne and an infethe bar
Shortly afterward Bailey made a name riority complex.
After a string of b9ring secretarial
for himself by successfully defending jobs, things started to look up for her in
murder suspect George O Edgerly. His the early '50s when she entered a Glamcourtroom style is flamboyantly dramat- our magazine talent contest. The encouric: in the early days amused journalists aging result; A job writing advertising '
-<compared him to the fictional television copy for bathing suits.
· character Perry Mason. But his capacity
A decade later, she published a rnanito win cases has been consistently high
fes(o of her woman-as-doormat philosAnd he's continued to take on controver- ophy of life entitled "Sex and the Single
sial and notorious clients, such as Dr.
Gir.l " It caused a sensation,' launched her
Sam Sheppard, Albert DeSalvo (the al.
..
. s· Jeged Boston Strangler), Ca!'!t-- Ernest-Me-, writing career.. ·· . . , ... at·45'·imd·wlt'h
Brown tlien·ptoceed'ed;
~ .o -a1ni{of,M"y1al, arid of coµrse Patty Hearst
no previous editing experl~nce, to revamp
Bailey's book, "To Be a Trial Lawyer,"
the sagging Hearst · ~blication Cosmois based on his 22 years of experiences politan. She drastically changed the for· and addresses some e>f the questions rel- _rnat and upped. its readership to Its preevant to aspi,_:ing lawyer~,
sent 2.8 million.
Brown is now a mlllionairess who
ROY BLOUNT JR.
lives In baronial splendor In New York
"One Fell Soup, or I'm Just a Bug on with her husband David Brown, a 20ththe Windshield of Life." Atlantic-Lit- Century Fox executive.

tle, Brown.

.

Roy Blount's work seems to keep turning up. everywhere. Sports Illustrated.
The New Yorker. Esquire. Cosmopolitan.
The Atlantic Monthly. Playboy Organic
Gardening. More . than 50 of his short
pieces are Included In this collection of
satire, fiction, reporting, rumination,
criticism, doggerel, musing, and assorted
foolishness
. .,
"Until now, these pieces have never
gi had a -chance to join gravies," Blount
~writes in his, Introduction. "Most of them
>,<· have been served. before, but In twenty~ one almost pathalogically disparate pub~ licatloris "
·
."I
Blount's range of subjects is at least as
0 fl,mg as his reading audience
> far
He
@deals with -an assortment of su)>jects,
• among them cricket-wrestling, sock loss,
chickens, pigs, styl.e, Steve Martin's
- prose, male sexuality, psychosomatic hero pes, problems of the singing-impaired
~ and why there will never be a great bowlf;; ing.novel.
o
"Oµe Fell Soup," Is his third book. His
~- first, "About Three Bricks Shy of Load,"
·'-I-about the Pittsburgh Steelers, was pube-, lished in 1977.. "It got good reviews but
..:i not a whole lot of money," Blount1'old one
:; interviewer. His second, "Crackers'.'' ape:!. pea:red in 1980. It was what you might
gJ call a personal statement about being a
"' native Georgian when Jimmy Carter was
S.Jll .Jlt~ Wh.it.e House. Blou,:it, who grew_
.~fn-Decatur, Ga.,.offered some.rev:ealing.

!

.co 1n

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,

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ROBERT A. ·cARO
"The Years of Lyndon Johnson: The
Path to Power." Knopf;
Robert Caro, 47. was born and raised
in Manhattan. Even before he entered
Princeton University, where he graduated
in 1957 with a BA in English, he clearly
was destined for a writing career. He was
editor of liis high school newspaper and
managing editor of the college paper.
After graduation, his first reporting
job was with the New Brunswick (N J.)
Horne News. In 1958, he joined Newsday,
where he was an Investigative reporter
seven years He attended Harvard In 1965
as a Nieman Fellow and, the following
year, won a Carnegie Fellowship to Columbia Graduate School of Journalism
Carp'~ professional life apparently is
based on seven-year cycles After seven
years at Newsday, _he quit to· begin researching his first book, "The Power
Broker; Robert Moses and the Fall of New
York " That took !!even years·. The book,
a blockbuster, was published in 1975.
That year he -von a Pulitzer Prize for.biography and th<; Francis Parkman Prize of
the Society of American Historians
"The Years of Lyndon Johnson" Is his
second biography It, too, took seven
years to research and write

short Jtory writer John Cheever, Susan
Cheeve_r was born in New York City in
1943 and graduated from Brown University in 1965. Her first writingjobs were in
journalism, as a 1reporter on the Tarrytown (!'J.'() Daily News, and later Newsweek ·Her four:year stint on the magazine - .she was lifestyle editor - provided
some of,the background for the husband
in "The Cage." her third novel And certain aspects of the New Hampshire landscape, where Susan Cheever's mother's
family .Jived, provided the wife in "The
Cage" with setting and opportunity
·
Prefe\'ring longer fiction, she has only
one pulJlished short story to her credit.
She's triarrled to Calvin Tomkins who
writes'for The New Yorker and they have
an Infant daughter, Sarah.

DIANA DER HOVANESSIAN
Coordinator of Poetryfor Festival
Diana Der Hovanessian is a poet,
translator and poetry teacher She takes
pride _in the fact that she is one of those
rare persons who makes a living with her
poetry.
Her poetry has been translated by
leadfng poets in the Soviet Union and Europe, She has also done major work in the
cause of Armenian poetry She co-edited
and.translated "The Anthology of Armenian.Poetry (Columbia University Press )
Der Hovanessian 'leaches poetry in
public schools and is president of the New
England Poetry Society.

ALAN M. DERSHOWITZ

"The Best DefeTL,Se," Random House.
Alan Dershowltz, 44, Is a native New
Yorker who was raised In the Boro Park
se.~tion of Brooklyn A poor student In
high school, he reversed himself at Brook1:y;.a,:_Ci:J.lll,ge, graduating. magn;i. cum
laiide..He-rnainfaliied that formidable record at Yale Law School, where lie graduated first In his class In 1962 At the age
of. 28, he became Harvard Law School's
youngest professor.
As one of the nation's· foreinQSt civil
libertarians, Dershowltz has enraged liberals by defending Nazis .In Skokie, Ill,, .a
member of the Jewish Defense League In
New Yprk and, in a debate .at Stanford
Urilverslty, Nobel laureate William
Shockley. who postulates the genetic Inferiority of blacks. He 'is an adamant defender of the·us Constltutlon;forclng liberal, ·moderate and conservative alike·to
rethink their positions. He is Immovable
In his belief that every American has a
Constitutional right to counsel.
He is, says a lawyer colleague, "a brilliant mind hitched to the fastest tongue
In the East.''
· Dershowitz Is not prone to don a cloak
of humility. He revels In publicity but, he
Insists, "for my clients' sake, not my
dwn." He has involved himself in a number of celebrity cases; Claus vqn Bulow Is
the latest.
'
·
Despite his own admirers and detractors, Dershowltz has won a national
reputation as "lawyer of last resort." He
lives In Cambridge, sharing a large house
with two sons Elon, 21. and Jamin, 19,
when they are home from college, He divorced his wife in 1975 and won custody.

JOHN W. DEAN 3d
"Lost Honor." Straiford Press.

John Dean was the legal counsel In
President Nixon's adrnlrilstrat!on who refused to play scapegoat In the Watergate
coverup. He, unlike the others, was summarily fired, not allowed to resign. He
.SUSAN CHEEVER
was convicted of Watergate-related
crim~_"'-I!_d served time In prison and was
''The 9age~·: Hougb.ton ..ll{ifflil\. , , .d!s,ba;:J:~rotIUlr.!lS.1iJ:!JJg~w,.,, - h · · -~ 0
·- __ ·-~a:gl'lt~bii'~IM'e"'""rl~'irhd :, ,- Dean wasln- .prlsorf~.--,l;ki!JW!l.~

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Judith Martin
... speaking Saturday
outside of Baltimore from Se1?i;). 1973, to
Jan 8, 1975. While incarcerated; he kept
a personal diary and lncl~decfparts In his
first book, "Blind.Ambition.·, ~
After release from prison,);ie moved to
Los Angeles, with Maureen; J;iis second
wife. He hosted a natlona11:x·'.15yndlcated
radio program called "Yo9._i:· Right to
Know" which dealt with everyt:hing except W.atergate from the summer of 1977
to May 1978. He has written various articles for Rolling Stone. In 1976 he covered
the Republican Convention for that publication His story led to the resignation of
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz,
y,liose ~acially lnflamµi'atoryi remarks_.
were inducted. He al!\Q has clone, ccinsiderable. Jecturlng on the .college circuit; some
freelance research for law f'irms, and currently produc¢s a number 6( ~dlcated
radio shows
.;,{, ''.;
-

• JOHND. EHRLIC~.,;.
"Witness to Powe_r." Pocki~ ~ks.

In,,

Born March 20, 1925,
'Taco111a,
Wash , John Erhlichman Is )lest known
for his career and downfall i~'f,lie Nixon
adm.lnlstratlon. He vvas gradti11led from
Stanford Law School In 1951, and pz:acticed law In Seattle until his follege chum
H. R Haldeman lur.ed hlni Into Nixon's
campaign for President In 1960; afterwards he returned to his practice. Ehrlichman briefly helped Nixon In. a 1962
campaign for governor.and, In 1968, was
"to.ur director" for· Nlxori's preslderitial
campaign - a position that launched a
national reptitatlori for_ efficiency that
blossomed to legendary proportions. A
colleague once said: "He leaves.no more
blood on the .floor than he h~)i'~~ii.'' ·
A Christian Scientist ~Q-nelthe.r
smoked nor drank, Ehrlici(ma-ri first
served as counsel 'to Nixon anil,, lri the
second administration, . as a~}stant for
domestic affairs. As Nlxon 's 'top. adviser,
Ehrlichman screened virtually everything before it went to the .Etesidel'!t. He·
resigned in the wake of t~; 'Watergate
scandal and, in 1974, was conv.!cted of
conspiracy, obsti-tictlon of justice, and
perjury Prosecutors alleged that he had
been involved in approving huge money
payments In the Watergate cover-up attempts by ordering destruction of evldence and offering clemency to the breakin defendants In .exchange for their :stlence
·
Ehrlichman, 57, served time In prison, __
% - ~ frqIP,..tJ:te.Ja~ JlP.t\-l;i?,s.. _

~@cJ~~~Ht~~~itf~·- ·
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sec_ond book, "I! Changed My Life."
wh1c)1 documented the changes in women's lives over the preceding decade. Last
year came "The Second Stage," in which
Friedan writes that women need not
abandon family life in their search for career fulfillment, and that neither sex
should be tyrannized by work over family. Between books, she has written for
magazines including McCall's, Harper's
and Saturday Review, as well as the New
York Times.
·

John Erhlichman
... speaking S11nday

has written two other books, "The Company" anc;I "The Whole Truth "

PIERRE FRANEY
"Pierrfi'Fr~ney's Kitchen." Times
8()(Jks. . . ,
-

(f yp~'ve ever vranted to sneak a peek
Inside tire. kitchen of a real chef, here's
your ~li~pce. Pierre Franey welcomes
readers lp!o his own home in East Hampton, Lorig Island, by starting with a chapter on how he redesigned the kitchen to
meet his needs.
Born In 1921, the son of a plumber In
. the village of St. Vlnnemar near Chablis,
France, Franey began his culinary etluca_tlqn as a child by helping his mother lri
the kitchen. HlsJormal training started
at age 13, as an apprentice at a Paris restaurant, where .he did such chores as
scrapipg '{egetables and cleaning chJck, ens. Later;he became the protege of Emile
Domas, who brciught him to the United
States at age 18 as one of a teain of chefs
. cookuig I.it the French, Pavilion : afthe
· 193Q,4ir:New York World's Fair. After
servbtlf il,\ tfie US Army during· World
War Il, 4e·went to work at the New York
. restaui;l;\'i\i Le, .Pavilon. (an outgrowth of
the Woriif's Fair restaurant), ,wher¢ he
event.ua'lly;'took over· the kitchen: Since
1975 .h~ Jias been a food writer for The
New York'Tlmes, best-kriown for his "'60_Mlnute !}ourrnet" i:x>lunia and books. He
has also written a ·number"of cookbooks
wltli Times colleague Craig Claiborne; in· ·
cluding "The Gourmet Diet."

BETTY FRIEDAN
"The Second? Stage." Summit Books.
Once Betty Friedan was : .. well, just a
housewlfe,,as they used to say. "In 1949,"
she ha~. ~ltten, "I was concentrating on
brea11t fe. e.ding a.n. d wheeling my first
h.
Udby, ~IWY· to the park and reading Dr.
Spock:'J~as beginning to wonder if I real. ly warit~ to go back to work, after all,
·when my maternity leave was up." Then,
in 1963;.'the suburban New York house,
wife' chi#,ge<I from belrig the mother of
tntee chiltlren Into "the mother of the
women's movement" with publication of
her fftsfBook, "The Feminine Mystique,"
which told bored, depressed women that
their personal "problem that has no
• -name" was really political.
Before her marriage, Frieda!)., a. native
of ~rla,-Ill., graduated from Smith College and worked as a labor relations repdrter in NewYork City. In 1966, she became. the founder and first president of
the N:~tio~al Organization' for Women;
-'slie';ttso ~